My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—We reached Washington, D. C., in time for lunch yesterday and the visitors began to arrive at once. I did have a little time to talk over one or two important family things with the President before he was again engulfed in government affairs, and I was chatting with various people.

At 4:40, I went to the airport with Jimmy and Rommie, who were starting for the West Coast, and waited to meet my daughter, who was coming in from Seattle, Wash., to attend Mayor La Guardia's meeting on civilian volunteer participation in defense.

Anna was about twenty minutes late, which meant that a gentleman who was waiting to hand me a gift for the President sent by the Mayor of an English city, had to wait for nearly twenty minutes. However, he was very kind about it. Afterwards, Dr. Frederick Douglass Patterson, the President of Tuskegee Institute, came to tell me how well the training of the flying cadets is progressing there, and that Tuskegee is being named as a recreational area for Negro men on leave from Fort Benning.

The Crown Princess of Norway and her party left to return to Massachusetts on an evening train. Our only other dinner guests were Dr. Floyd Reeves, of the American Youth Commission, and Dr. James Meader of Russell Sage College. The latter told me of a most interesting week, which Russell Sage College is going to arrange in October, in which the City of Troy, N.Y., will participate. The college will celebrate its 25th anniversary with Pan-American week, during which the citizens of Troy will become familiar with the countries of Central and South America under as many different aspects as possible. They hope that their program may serve as a suggestion for doing the same thing in many other localities, which will create a greater sense of friendliness in this hemisphere.

Today has been given up entirely to the meeting held in the White House by Mayor La Guardia's Committee. Five members have been named from every corps area and represent all the different interests that enter into our national life. The President received the whole group and spoke to them for a few minutes and then the Mayor proceeded to outline his general ideas.

After lunch, the details were taken up and I hope that every member of the committee will go home knowing what the first steps in this program actually mean in the way of work. The future alone can tell how it will develop.

Anna goes back to Seattle tonight, and I feel that we have stolen a very happy 24 hours at a time I had not expected to see her. The President and I will leave almost at the same time by train for Hyde Park. I am delighted that we are going to have those few days there in spite of the world events which seem more threatening in every way.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL