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GW Digital Humanities Symposium

Thursday January 24 - Saturday January 26, 2013

 

There are no absolute demarcations between bodily existence and computer simulation.

--N. Katherine Hayles

 

Photos Credits:
Simon Norfolk, NYTimes "Wires" 2012;
Erich Hartmann, Magnum "IMB Circuits" 1982;

 

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Tentative schedule. Please stay tuned; final details to be announced.

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Thursday, January 24, 2013, GWU School of Media and Public Affairs Building, Room #310, 805 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC

6:30-8:00 pm ~ The symposium will begin on Thursday evening with a screening of the film Anna May Wong: In Her Own Words” presented by director Yunah Hong. Lily Wong will offer a response after the screening. The film will begin at 6:30 and has a run time of about 90 minutes. Organized by Patricia Chu (GW).

Yunah Hong, Filmmaker

Ms. Hong is an award winning filmmaker who lives in New York City. She studied art history, photography and design at Seoul National University, graduating in 1985. Two years later she earned an M. A. in computer graphics at the New York Institute of Technology. She has made eight films, ranging in scale from a one-hour documentary to short experimental productions. Her documentary, “Between the Lines: Asian American Women’s Poetry” (2001) shows how the work of Asian American woman poets reflects their lives. It received a CINE Golden Eagle Award in 2002. Her latest, “Anna May Wong: In Her Own Words” is scheduled to broadcast on PBS Plus in the States, on May 2013. She has also published an article about Wong, “A Twentieth Century Actress: A conversation with Yunah Hong and Peter X. Feng” in Quarterly Review of Film and Video, Routledge in 2006.


Lily Wong, Assistant Professor Department of Literature, American University

Dr. Wong received her PhD in Comparative Literature at University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research pays close attention to the politics of affect/emotion, gender and sexuality, as well as media formations of transpacific Chinese and Sinophone communities. She has published in journals including Asian Cinema, Pacific Affairs and China Review International, and book chapters in World Cinema and the Visual Arts (Anthem Press, 2012). She recently gave a paper at the 2012 Association for Asian Performance conference entitled "Over My Dead Body: Affective Economies of Anna May Wong and Ruan Ling-yu."


Patricia Chu, Deputy Chair and Associate Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. Patricia Pei-chang Chu (Ph.D. in English literature, Cornell University) teaches courses on contemporary Asian American literature and culture, women’s autobiography, and contemporary American literature. She is interested in the ways Asian American writers claim subjectivity and citizenship through writing. Her current work concerns narratives of “return,” representations of diasporic subjects’ journeys to their or the ancestors’ Asian homelands. Her book Assimilating Asians: Gendered Strategies of Authorship in Asian America was published by Duke University Press in 2000.

 

Friday, January 25, 2013, Jack Morton Auditorium, Ground floor of GWU School of Media and Public Affairs Building, 805 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC

 

8:30 am - 5:30 pm ~ Digital humanities book display and sales.

 

8:30-8:50 am ~ Morning Coffee and Registration

 

8:50-9:00 am ~ Welcome by Alexa Huang (GW)

Alexa Huang, Director of the Dean's Scholars in Shakespeare Program and Associate Professor of English, Theatre and Dance, East Asian Languages and Literatures, and International Affairs, George Washington University; Co-General Editor, The Shakespearean International Yearbook; General Performance Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions; Research Affiliate in Literature at MIT.

Recipient of the MLA's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange (Columbia UP), she chairs the MLA committee on New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare, which sponsors the Digital Challenge. She is also the co-founder and co-director, with Peter Donaldson, of Global Shakespeares. Part of his work focuses on racial histories that connect imaginative writing to performances, which led to the publications of Shakespeare in Hollywood, Asia and Cyberspace (co-edited) and Class, Boundary and Social Discourse in the Renaissance (co-edited), and a special issue of Shakespeare (Journal of BSA, forthcoming). Her second monograph Weltliteratur und Welttheater: Ästhetischer Humanismus in der kulturellen Globalisierung was published by Transcript Verlag in 2012 (available on Amazon.com). She has contributed to The Luminary Tempest, an iPad app, ed. Katherine Rowe and Elliott Visconsi.

 

9:00-9:10 am ~ Opening remarks by Vice Provost Paul Berman (GW)

Paul Berman, Vice Provost for Online Education and Academic Innovation, George Washington University

Vice Provost Paul Berman, currently dean of the George Washington University Law School, will become vice provost for online education and academic innovation effective January 15, 2013. He takes on this new challenge as part of the university’s efforts to realize the great promise of online and hybrid education. This new position will help GW develop strategies for how to utilize new technologies to create innovative and effective programs for our students. During his tenure as dean, he has helped build strong ties between the Law School and the other schools by exploring new programs in key areas such as government contracting and intellectual property law. He has also developed stronger links to the members of the Law School's national advisory councils. Throughout his career, Professor Berman has distinguished himself as a driver and champion of innovation. Professor Berman is the author of numerous books and scholarly journal articles. His most recent book, Global Legal Pluralism: A Jurisprudence for Law Beyond Borders, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. He also is a sought-after speaker at invited lectures and at conferences and symposia nationwide. He is frequently cited as an expert in media, radio, and television outlets, including The Washington Post, The New York Times, Forbes, ABC News, NBC News, and the BBC.

 

9:10 am - 10:10 am ~ Keynote Presentation

Moderator: Jonathan Hsy (GW)

Jonathan Hsy, Assistant Professor of English, George Washington University

Professor Hsy's current research investigates multilingualism and commerce in medieval England and France, but his interests extend into later fields and periods, including early print culture, postcolonial theory, and the history of the English language. His new book Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval Literature is forthcoming from Ohio State University Press. He is woring with Candace Barrington on Global Chaucers, a multi-national, multi-lingual project to locate, catalog, translate, archive, and analyze translations and appropriations of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, with a focus on non-Anglophone adaptations dating after 1945. He is also a member of the Editorial Committee for the Medieval Disability Glossary Wiki associated with the Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages. Since fall 2012, he has been an active blogger at In the Middle, a group blog that features regular contributions by Jeffrey Cohen and others.

Elaine Treharne (Stanford): The Digital Text as Inhabited Object

Elaine Treharne, Professor of English, Standford University

Professor Treharne's research and teaching focuses on English texts and manuscripts from c. 700 to 1200 and, in recent years, on Text Technologies from the earliest times to the present day. She is particularly interested in the materiality of the manuscript book, its tactile nature, and the multiple layers that make up the codex (its 'architexuality'). Current projects include The Sensual Book, analyzing the interactions between manuscripts and their users in England from 800 to 1200, manuscripts’ digital reproduction and the theoretical implications of touch and the 'voluminous'. In this work, she emphasizes English and, to a lesser extent, Latin and French texts entered into margins and blank spaces by those who actively engaged with the manuscripts. Elaine is also writing the Oxford Very Short Introduction to Medieval Literature (OUP, 2013); planning a book on Borders in Anglo-Saxon England; editing the new four-volume Encyclopaedia of Book History: Manuscript, Print and Digital Technologies for Wiley-Blackwell (2014); and researching Beauty and the Book: Arts and Crafts to Modernism, 1890-1940, on Edward Johnston, Eric Gill and David Jones.

 

10:10-10:30 am ~ Coffee Break

 

10:30-11:40 ~ Screen(ing) Cultures: Cinematic and Digital Media (15-minute presentations followed by Q and A)

Moderator: Patricia Chu (GW)

Patricia Chu, Deputy Chair and Associate Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. Patricia Pei-chang Chu (Ph.D. in English literature, Cornell University) teaches courses on contemporary Asian American literature and culture, women’s autobiography, and contemporary American literature. She is interested in the ways Asian American writers claim subjectivity and citizenship through writing. Her current work concerns narratives of “return,” representations of diasporic subjects’ journeys to their or the ancestors’ Asian homelands. Her book Assimilating Asians: Gendered Strategies of Authorship in Asian America was published by Duke University Press in 2000.

Maida Withers (GW): Dancing with Digital Technologies

Maida Withers, Professor of Dance, George Washington University

Born in Kanab, Utah, Maida studied Dance and Theatre at Brigham Young University (BA) and Dance and Education at the University of Utah (MS). She is the Founding Artistic Director of Maida Withers Dance Construction Company (MWDCCo) and a Professor in the Department of Theatre and Dance, The George Washington University. Since the 1960s Maida has dedicated her life to the creation, development, and distribution of contemporary work. Maida is recognized internationally for her large-scale multimedia performances, the fresh and often sensual and robust movements that brand her performances, and her ongoing interest and recognition in experimentation and innovation with dance and technology. Maida’s tours internationally include Guatemala, France, Netherlands, Japan, Croatia, China, Hong Kong, India, Korea, Brazil, Finland, Venezuela, Mexico, Poland, Germany, and others with sponsorship of U.S. Embassies and the U.S. Department of State, Trust for Mutual Understanding, others. Her dance film shorts have been shown in Germany, Australia, Brazil, and India; California, South Carolina, Washington, DC, Utah, Chicago, and Arlington. Recent awards include the Life-time Achievement Award – Festival in the Desert (2010); Arlington County Fellowship for Filmmaking “Portraits in Dance” (2010); Commission from Research Channel Grant, “Data to Dance, Documentary Film (2008); Pola Nirenska Lifetime Achievement Award (2006); 2006 Metro DC’s highest award annually for dance, “Outstanding Overall Production in a Large Venue;” 2006 Washington DC Mayor’s top prize for “Distinction in a Discipline;” Dance Place Award for Lifelong Achievement in Education, Maida Withers Dance Construction Company will celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2014.

Kathryn Kleppinger (GW): Reading Books on TV: Using Digital Archives to Study Novels and Their Reception

Kathryn Kleppinger, Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies, George Washington University

Professor Kleppinger completed her PhD in the Joint program in French literature and French Studies at New York University in 2011. Her teaching and research interests center around contemporary French and Francophone literature, in particular how writing from outside metropolitan France influences and shapes conceptions of the French literary canon. Her current book project, tentatively titled Why the Beur Novel? Authors and Journalists Interact to Construct a New French Voice studies the television and radio reception of novels written by the children of North African immigrants to France.

Peter X. Feng (Delaware): Asian Americans and Media Consumption: On Audience Formations and New Television Modalities

Peter X. Feng, Associate Professor, University of Delaware

Peter X Feng received his B.A. in American Studies from Yale University and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Film Studies from The University of Iowa, and currently serves as the Associate Chair of English. He was Chancellor's Distinguished Visiting Professor of Film Studies at UC-Irvine (1997-98) and a member of the Advisory Board for Wayne State University Press' Contemporary Approaches to Film and Media Series since 2003. Dr. Feng has published articles in Cinema Journal, Cineaste, Amerasia Journal, Jump Cut, Camera Obscura, and elsewhere. Screening Asian Americans (2002), a collection of essays on Asian Americans and Film, was published by Rutgers University Press; Identities in Motion: Asian American Film and Video (2002), was published by Duke University Press. Dr. Feng teaches courses in Theory, Asian American Literature, and Film Studies: recent courses include "Sex and Violence in Asian American Literature," "Texts and Contexts: Movies, Novels, Comics," "The Hollywood Musical," and the graduate seminar "Narrating Race, Narrating Nation."

 

11:40-12:30 pm ~ Lunch Break (Lunch for Conference Speakers Served in Rome Hall #771)

 

12:30-1:30 pm ~ Visual, Cultural and Linguistic Topographies (15-minute presentations followed by Q and A)

Moderator: Holly Dugan (GW)

Holly Dugan, Associate Professor of English, George Washington University

Professor Dugan's research and teaching interests explore relationships between history, literature, and material culture. Her scholarship focuses on questions of gender, sexuality, and the boundaries of the body in late medieval and early modern England. She is currently working on a book-length project, co-authored with Scott Maisano, that examines the pre-modern history of primatology through the lens of Shakespeare. Her book The Ephemeral History of Perfume: Scent and Sense in Early Modern England (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011) investigates the influence of olfaction in early modern England.

Janelle Jenstad (U Vic): Looking for the Forest in XML Trees, or, Where's London in The Map of Early Modern London

Janelle Jenstad, Associate Professor of English, University of Victoria, Canada

Professor Jenstad directs The Map of Early Modern London (MoEML), a SSHRC-funded project that maps the streets, sites, and significant boundaries of late sixteenth-century and early seventeenth-century London (1560-1640). Taking the Agas map as its platform, the project links encyclopedia-style articles, scholarly work, student work, editions, and literary texts to the places mentioned therein. A versioned edition of Stow's 1598, 1603, and 1633 texts of A Survey of London is forthcoming. In Dec. 2011, she was appointed Assistant Coordinating Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions. Her publications include essays and chapters in Elizabethan Theatre, The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Early Modern Literary Studies, Shakespeare Bulletin, The Silver Society Journal, Institutional Culture in Early Modern Society (Brill), Shakespeare, Language and the Stage (Arden Shakespeare), Approaches to Teaching Othello (MLA), Performing Maternity in Early Modern England (Ashgate), New Directions in the Geohumanities: Art, Text, and History at the Edge of Place (Routledge), and Teaching Early Modern English Literature from the Archives (MLA, forthcoming).

Shoko Hamano (GW): Visualizing Japanese Grammar

Shoko Hamano, Director of the Language Center and Professor of Japanese and International Affairs, George Washington University

Dr. Hamano is an award winning professor of Japanese. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropological Linguistics in 1986 from the University of Florida. In March, 2011, Professor Hamano and her colleague Wakana Kikuchi-Cavanaugh, won the MERLOT Award for Exemplary Online Learning Resources for their "Visualizing Japanese Grammar" learning materials. Dr. Hamano received GW's Trachtenberg Prize for Teaching in 2004. Her publication includes The Sound-Symbolic System of Japanese (CSLI, 1998); Making Sense of Japanese Grammar (University of Hawaii Press, 2002); and Intermediate Japanese: A Grammar and Workbook (Routledge,2011).

Cathy Eisenhower and Ken Jacobs (GW): Digital Poetry

Cathy Eisenhower, Humanities and Instruction Librarian, Gelman Library, George Washington University

She has published articles on library instruction and critical pedagogy, a collection of poems, clearing without reversal (2008), from Edge Books, and would with and, a second collection, is forthcoming from Roof Books. She works closely with the GWU women's studies program on "Women in and Beyond the Global: An Open-Access Feminist Project" and has played a key role in starting a pilot of open-access scholarly publishing at Gelman Library. Her areas of expertise include U.S. and Latin American women's poetry, pedagogy, translation, and fugitive publishing. She has designed a number of online research guides.

Ken Jacobs

Ken Jacobs has lived in and about Washington D.C. for more than thirty years. A chapbook, Sooner, from Phylum Press was released in December 2009. He has poems in The Portable Boog Reader, the online journal Everyday Genius, the journal Sentence, as well as an essay in a special issue of Damn the Caesars. He has a series of poems forthcoming in Wheelhouse Magazine. He also designed, produced, and wrote the software for the collaborative digital poetry project Relegy, which he performed with M. Magnus and Cathy Eisenhower in the Spring of 2011.

 

1:30-1:45 pm ~ Coffee Break

 

1:45-3:00 pm ~ Joint Enterprises (15-minute presentations followed by Q and A)

Moderator: Chris Sten (GW)

Christopher Sten, Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. Sten's teaching and scholarly interests focus on the American novel, Melville, race and ethnicity, transnationalism, visual culture, Modernism, and writing about Washington, DC. Much of his research and writing has centered on Herman Melville, and in recent years, a good deal of his professional life has been devoted to service in the Melville Society and the Society’s Cultural Project and Archive at the New Bedford Whaling Museum in Massachusetts. His current research focuses on Melville’s short fiction and on a study of adaptations, appropriations, and “remixing” of Melville’s texts in various media, including “new media.” His books include Literary Capital: A Washington Reader (edited, University of Georgia Press, 2011), “Whole Oceans Away”: Melville in the Pacific (coedited, Kent State University Press, 2007), Sounding the Whale: MOBY-DICK as Epic Novel (Kent State University Press, 1996) and The Weaver-God, He Weaves: Melville and the Poetics of the Novel (Kent State University Press, 1996).

John Bryant (Hofstra): TextLab, Sustainability, Collaborative Editing, and Melville's Billy Budd (Melville Electronic Library)

John Bryant, Professor of English, Hofstra University

Dr. Bryant's principal research focus is on nineteenth-century American literature and culture, in particular the works of Herman Melville but also, transcendentalism, Emerson, Poe, and antebellum African American writing. He also specializes in textual studies and digital scholarship, paying special attention to how writers and readers revise texts—making them into what he calls “fluid texts”—and how scholars might use online technology to show users how fluid texts evolve. He is the editor of Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies and of the Melville Electronic Library. The Melville Electronic Library is projected to be the first born-digital online resource for Melville studies, texts, research, and teaching. Housed in Hofstra University's server, MEL is organized by a group of internationally-known Melville scholars and digital specialists. With NEH funding, MEL's primary focus in its first two years of development has been to establish scholarly "fluid-text" editions of three focal works: Moby-Dick, Battle-Pieces, and Billy Budd.

Candace Barrington (CCSU) and Jonathan Hsy (GW): Global Chaucers

Candace Barrington, Professor of English, Central Connecticut State University

Dr. Barrington has long-term interests in Chaucer reception, particularly the presence and uses of The Canterbury Tales in American popular culture. Her innovative book, American Chaucers, was published in 2007 and has been supplemented by articles examining the appropriation of Chaucer by You-Tube, children's picture books, New Orleans' Mardi Gras, African-American poets, and veterans of the American Civil War. Beyond these research interests, Barrington has a long-standing commitment to collaboration: co-editing two essay collections, co-authoring essays, as well as holding campus- and statewide leadership roles (such as shepherding for four years Central Connecticut State University’s Faculty Senate and restoring its credibility as a instrument for effective shared governance). She is working with Jonathan Hsy on Global Chaucers, a multi-national, multi-lingual project to locate, catalog, translate, archive, and analyze translations and appropriations of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, with a focus on non-Anglophone adaptations dating after 1945.

Jonathan Hsy, Assistant Professor of English, George Washington University

Professor Hsy's current research investigates multilingualism and commerce in medieval England and France, but his interests extend into later fields and periods, including early print culture, postcolonial theory, and the history of the English language. His new book Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval Literature is forthcoming from Ohio State University Press. He is woring with Candace Barrington on Global Chaucers, a multi-national, multi-lingual project to locate, catalog, translate, archive, and analyze translations and appropriations of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, with a focus on non-Anglophone adaptations dating after 1945. He is also a member of the Editorial Committee for the Medieval Disability Glossary Wiki associated with the Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages. Since fall 2012, he has been an active blogger at In the Middle, a group blog that features regular contributions by Jeffrey Cohen and others.

Peter Donaldson (MIT) and Alexa Huang (GW): Global Shakespeares

Peter S. Donaldson, Ford Foundation Professor in the Humanities, MIT

Dr. Donaldson was educated at Columbia (BA 64, PhD 74) and Cambridge (BA 66 MA 70), where he held the Euretta J. Kellett Fellowship. His early research on the convergence of Machiavellian and sacred politics led to the publication of Machiavelli and Mystery of State (Cambridge U Press, 1988). Since the late 1980s he has focussed on two major research areas: Shakespeare on Film (Shakespearean Films/Shakespearean Directors and a series of articles now being revised for a book on Shakespeare and Media Allegory) and electronic projects involving Shakespeare across media. These include the Shakespeare Performance in Asia and Global Shakespeares digital video archives (both co-founded and co-edited with Alexa Huang), Shakespeare Electronic Archive, Hamlet on the Ramparts and XMAS: Cross-Media Annotation System, which supports the use of DVDs, images, and texts in student on-line discussions, in class presentations and multimedia essays. Donaldson has also been a pioneer in the use of media-rich presentations for scholarly and intepretive use. Donaldson is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (UK), has held research fellowships from the NEH and ACLS, and was the first Lloyd Davis Visiting Professor of Shakespeare Studies at the University of Queensland, Australia (2006).

Alexa Huang, Director of the Dean's Scholars in Shakespeare Program and Associate Professor of English, Theatre and Dance, East Asian Languages and Literatures, and International Affairs, George Washington University; Co-General Editor, The Shakespearean International Yearbook; General Performance Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions; Research Affiliate in Literature at MIT.

Recipient of the MLA's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange (Columbia UP), she chairs the MLA committee on New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare, which sponsors the Digital Challenge. She is also the co-founder and co-director, with Peter Donaldson, of Global Shakespeares. Part of his work focuses on racial histories that connect imaginative writing to performances, which led to the publications of Shakespeare in Hollywood, Asia and Cyberspace (co-edited) and Class, Boundary and Social Discourse in the Renaissance (co-edited), and a special issue of Shakespeare (Journal of BSA, forthcoming). Her second monograph Weltliteratur und Welttheater: Ästhetischer Humanismus in der kulturellen Globalisierung was published by Transcript Verlag in 2012 (available on Amazon.com). She has contributed to The Luminary Tempest, an iPad app, ed. Katherine Rowe and Elliott Visconsi.

Ryan Cordell (Northeastern): DHCommons and ProfHacker

Ryan Cordell, Assistant Professor of English, Northeastern University

Dr. Cordell's scholarship focuses on the intersections between literary, periodical, and religious culture in antebellum America. He is building a digital edition of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story “The Celestial Railroad” in American periodicals during the 1840s and 50s. He serves on NITLE’s Digital Humanities Council as secretary/treasurer of the Digital Americanists scholarly society. He is also on the board of the DHCommons project. DHCommons aims to combat isolation in the digital humanities by connecting people with expertise with digital projects that need that expertise. He writes about technology in higher education for the group blog ProfHacker at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

3:00-3:15 pm ~ Coffee Break

 

3:15-4:15 pm ~ Expanding Linguistic and Virtual Communities (15-minute presentations followed by Q and A)

Moderator: Robert McRuer (GW)

Robert McRuer, Chair and Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. McRuer’s work focuses on queer and crip cultural studies and critical theory. He recently won the Alan Bray Memorial Book Award for his book Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability. Since Prof. McRuer began to further his unique research in the combined fields of queer and disabilities studies, he has also edited an anthology, taught at GW, and continued to develop his ideas. Although the book is written for a scholarly audience, Prof. McRuer expressed his delight that people outside the academic world are finding the book accessible and meaningful.

Melissa Malzkuhn (Gallaudet): Achieving Linguistic Equality Through Sign Language Publishing: Gallaudet University's Deaf Studies Digital Journal

Melissa Malzkuhn, Coordinator, Community Engagement, Gallaudet University

Melissa Malzkuhn is the Digital Innovation and Media Strategies Manager at the Science of Learning Center on Visual Language and Visual Learning (“VL2”, vl2.gallaudet.edu) at Gallaudet University, in Washington D.C. VL2 is a premier research center on how deaf children learn to read through using the visual modality, encompassing the following disciplines: neurocognitive science, biology, linguistics, psychology, socio-cultural, and pedagogy. Malzkuhn leads projects translating research findings into educational resources. She was the Managing Editor of Deaf Studies Digital Journal, a peer-reviewed online digital journal in sign language, from 2008 to 2012. She currently serves as an Executive Editor. Malzkuhn received her MA in Deaf Studies with a concentration in Cultural Studies from Gallaudet.

Will Noel (U Penn): What Does Accessible Data Look Like?

William Noel, Director of University of Pennsylvania Libraries' Special Collections and Founding Director of Center and Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies

A distinguished art historian committed to open access, Noel has groundbreaking experience in the application of digital technologies to manuscript studies. He has directed an international program to conserve, image and study the Archimedes Palimpsest, the unique source for three treatises by the ancient Greek mathematician (www.archimedespalimpsest.org). The UPenn Rare Book and Manuscript Library serves faculty and students across the Penn campus and around the world. He joined U Penn from his post as curator of manuscripts and rare books at The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. Among his books are The Harley Psalter (1995), The Oxford Bible Pictures (2005), and The Archimedes Codex (2007). An advocate for open manuscript data, during his tenure the Walters began to release full digital surrogates of its illuminated medieval manuscripts under a creative commons license. After receiving his PhD from Cambridge University, England in 1993, Dr. Noel held positions at Downing College, Cambridge University, as director of studies in the history of art, and at The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, as assistant curator of manuscripts. Email wgnoel@upenn.edu

Young-Key Kim Renaud (GW): Linguistic Diversity, Globalization, and Digital Revolutions

Young-Key Kim-Renaud, Chair of the East Asian Languages and Literatures Department, Professor of Korean language and Culture and International Affairs, faculty member of the Linguistics Program, George Washington University

Dr. Kim-Renaud is the initiator and a co-convener of the annual Hahn Moo-Sook Colloquium in the Korean Humanitiesseries at GW. Before joining GW, she served as Assistant Program Director for Linguistics at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). She is past President of the International Circle of Korean Linguistics and has been the Editor-in-Chief of its journal, Korean Linguistics, since 2002. A theoretical linguist with a broad interest in the Korean humanities and Asian affairs, she has published nine books, most recently Creative Women of Korea: From the Fifteenth Century to the Twentieth Century (Sharpe, 2003) and And So Flows History, English translation of Hahn Moo-Soo's Korean original, Yosanun hurunda (Univ. of Hawaii Press, 2005). She has received several major research awards and grants, including three Fulbright awards, twice for Korea and once for Jordan. She has won individual research grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Social Science Research Council, and other foundations.

 

4:15-4:30 pm ~ Coffee Break

 

4:30-5:30 pm ~ Transformative Media, Transforming Community (15-minute presentations followed by Q and A)

Moderator: Daniel DeWispelare (GW)

Daniel DeWispelare, Assistant Professor of English, George Washington University

Professor DeWispelare received his PhD in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory from the University of Pennsylvania, and does research primarily in the British nineteenth century, with a focus on Romanticism, articles on which he has published in the Journal of British Studies, the Journal of Literature and Theology, and Cabinet Magazine: A Quarterly of Art and Culture. Mainly, he is interested in tracing the mechanisms by which the English language spread around the globe while simultaneously justifying that spread as legitimate. Before joining GW, he was Visiting Assistant Professor at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey.

Jeffrey Cohen (GW): Blogging and Social Media

Jeffrey Cohen, Director of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute and Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. Jeffrey Jerome Cohen's research explores what monsters reveal about the cultures that dream them; how postcolonial studies, queer theory, postmodernism and posthumanism might help us to better understand the texts and cultures of the Middle Ages; methods for discerning the complicated lives of what is supposed to be inanimate; and ecological theory. "Stories of Stone," his current project, is funded by fellowships from the ACLS and the Guggenheim Foundation, and investigates the liveliness of our most seemingly inert substance. He founded the group blog In the Middle, where along with Jonathan Hsy and others he is an active blogger. He contributed to the blog and book, Geoffrey Chaucer Hath a Blog.

Jyotsna Singh (Michigan State): Digital Asian Reincarnations of Shakespeare

Jyotsna G. Singh, Professor of English, Michigan State University, East Lansing

Dr. Singh has written on digital global and regional Shakespeare archives for the forthcoming Cambridge World Shakespeare Encyclopedia, and has has published extensively on early modern drama and culture, with an emphasis on Shakespeare; cross-cultural performances/appropriations of Shakespeare; early modern travel narratives; history of race and gender; and colonialism. Her recent books include Travel Knowledge: European 'Discoveries' in the Early Modern Period (co-edited Ivo Kamps, Palgrave, 2001) and A Companion to the Global Renaissance: English Literature and Culture in the Era of Expansion (editor, Blackwell 2009). She has received several research fellowships at the Folger Shakespeare Library; a Distinguished Faculty Fellowship at Queen Mary, University of London (2008), and a Long-term Research Fellowship at the John Carter Brown Library, Brown University (2010-11). The photo of Dr. Singh on the left was taken at Dalai Lama's monastery.

Christy Desmet (UGA): YouTube and the Humanities (joining us via Skype)

Christy Desmet, Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professor of English and Director of the Writing Center's First-year Composition Program, University of Georgia

Her book Reading Shakespeare's Characters: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Identity was published in 1992 by the University of Massachusetts Press and reprinted as an electronic book by netLibrary in 2000. She is the co-editor (with Robert Sawyer) of Shakespeare and Appropriation (Routledge, 1999) and of Harold Bloom's Shakespeare (Palgrave, 2001). With Sujata Iyengar, she is co-founder and co-general editor of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation. Her research interests include Shakespeare and New Media/Web 2.0, the rhetoric of reading and writing English history, theory, practice, and assessment of ePortfolios, and teaching writing and literature in digital contexts.

 

Saturday, January 26, 2013, Post Hall Terrace, Academic Building / Post Hall, George Washington University Mt. Vernon Campus, 2100 Foxhall Road Northwest, Washington, DC 20007~ Click Here for a map.

 

9:00 am - 2:00 pm ~ Digital humanities book display and sales

 

9:00-9:30 am ~ Morning Coffee

 

9:30-10:45 am ~ Digital Pedagogy (15-minute presentations followed by Q and A)

Moderator: Joseph Fruscione (GW)

Joe Fruscione, University Writing Program, George Washington University

Dr. Fruscione is adjunct professor of English at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and adjunct assistant professor of First-Year Writing at George Washington University. He has been teaching literature and writing at the university level since August 1999. He did his undergraduate work at the University of Delaware (BA, 1996) and graduate work at George Washington University (PhD, 2005). His fields of interest are 19th and 20th century American literature and culture, film, and adaptation studies. He has also written on Ralph Ellison's complex relationship with Hemingway in an essay from the new collection Hemingway and the Black Renaissance (eds. Gary Holcomb and Charles Scruggs, Ohio State UP 2012). He recently published an extensive dual biography chronicling the competition between two of America’s legendary writers. Faulkner and Hemingway: A Biography of a Literary Rivalry (Ohio State University Press, 2012) is the first book-length work analyzing the relationship between these two luminaries.

Josh Eyler (George Mason) and Jonathan Hsy (GW): Surveying a New Landscape: The Medieval Disability Studies Digital Glossary Project

Joshua R. Eyler, Associate Director, Center for Teaching Excellence, George Mason University

Upon receiving his Ph.D. in Medieval Studies from the University of Connecticut in 2006, Dr. Eyler moved to a position in the English department at Columbus State University in Georgia. After being approved for tenure at CSU, his love for teaching and desire to work with instructors from many different disciplines led him to the field of faculty development and to George Mason University, where he is currently an Associate Director of the Center for Teaching and Faculty Excellence as well as an Affiliate Associate Professor of English. He has published broadly on medieval literature, and his edited collection Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations was published by Ashgate in 2010. His eclectic research interests include brain-based learning theories, Chaucer, and disability studies.

Jonathan Hsy, Assistant Professor of English, George Washington University

Professor Hsy's current research investigates multilingualism and commerce in medieval England and France, but his interests extend into later fields and periods, including early print culture, postcolonial theory, and the history of the English language. His new book Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval Literature is forthcoming from Ohio State University Press. He is woring with Candace Barrington on Global Chaucers, a multi-national, multi-lingual project to locate, catalog, translate, archive, and analyze translations and appropriations of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, with a focus on non-Anglophone adaptations dating after 1945. He is also a member of the Editorial Committee for the Medieval Disability Glossary Wiki associated with the Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages. Since fall 2012, he has been an active blogger at In the Middle, a group blog that features regular contributions by Jeffrey Cohen and others.

Katherine Rowe (Bryn Mawr): Shakespeare's The Tempest for iPad

Katherine Rowe, Director of the Katharine Houghton Hepburn Center, Director of Digital Research and Teaching, and Chair and Professor of English, Bryn Mawr College

A Renaissance scholar with an interest in media history and adaptation, Katherine Rowe was described by The New York Times as one of “a small vanguard of digitally adept scholars ... rethinking how knowledge is understood and judged” in a story about her work as the guest editor of a special issue of the journal Shakespeare Quarterly that experimented with open scholarly review. She is Associate Editor of the Cambridge World Shakespeare Online, an international resource being developed by Cambridge University Press and the University of Southern California with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. With colleagues at Haverford and Swarthmore, she is a founder of the Tri-Co Digital Humanities initiative. She has written several books and numerous articles on Renaissance drama, Shakespeare adaptation, and media change. With Elliott Visconsi, she co-founded The Luminary Tempest, an iPad app.

Kurt Fendt (MIT): Multimedia Text Annotation Tools

Kurt Fendt, Executive Director, MIT's HyperStudio: Laboratory for Digital Humanities

Dr. Fendt is Principal Research Associate in Comparative Media Studies and Executive Director of MIT's HyperStudio - Laboratory for Digital Humanities. He teaches a new project-based digital humanities course and a range of upper-level German Studies courses in Foreign Languages and Literatures. Fendt has held Visiting Professorships at the University of Cologne, the Technical University of Aachen (both Germany), and the University of Klagenfurt, Austria; in 2001 he was Visiting Scientist at the Fraunhofer Institute in Sankt Augustin, Germany. He is co-Principal Investigator of several digital humanities projects such as the US-Iran – Missed Opportunities project, the Comédie-Française Registers project, and co-Director of Berliner sehen, a collaborative hypermedia learning environment for German Studies. Since 2005, he has been organizing the MIT European Short Film Festival. Before coming to MIT in 1993, Fendt was Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Linguistics at the University of Bern in Switzerland, where he earned his Ph.D. in modern German literature with a thesis on hypertext and text theory in 1993 after having completed his MA at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, Germany.

 

10:45-11:00 am ~ Coffee Break

 

11:00-12:15 pm ~ Archive Fever: Pleasures and Pitfalls (15-minute presentations followed by Q and A)

Moderator: Janelle Jenstad (University of Victoria)

Janelle Jenstad, Associate Professor of English, University of Victoria, Canada

Professor Jenstad directs The Map of Early Modern London (MoEML), a SSHRC-funded project that maps the streets, sites, and significant boundaries of late sixteenth-century and early seventeenth-century London (1560-1640). Taking the Agas map as its platform, the project links encyclopedia-style articles, scholarly work, student work, editions, and literary texts to the places mentioned therein. A versioned edition of Stow's 1598, 1603, and 1633 texts of A Survey of London is forthcoming. In Dec. 2011, she was appointed Assistant Coordinating Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions. Her publications include essays and chapters in Elizabethan Theatre, The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Early Modern Literary Studies, Shakespeare Bulletin, The Silver Society Journal, Institutional Culture in Early Modern Society (Brill), Shakespeare, Language and the Stage (Arden Shakespeare), Approaches to Teaching Othello (MLA), Performing Maternity in Early Modern England (Ashgate), New Directions in the Geohumanities: Art, Text, and History at the Edge of Place (Routledge), and Teaching Early Modern English Literature from the Archives (MLA, forthcoming).

Karim Boughida (GW) and Steve Mandeville-Gamble (GW): Partners in Crime: Successful Library Strategies for 21st Century Research

Karim Boughida, Associate University Librarian for Digital Initiatives and Content Management, George Washington University

He is leading different new campus-wide initiatives like Cyberinfrastructure Digital Scholarship Center. He is a public speaker and the general co-chair of JCDL 2012 (Joint Conference on Digital Libraries) hosted by GW and the Library of Congress. Before joining GW, he was senior information systems architect specializing in digital library and information architecture at the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA. Boughida holds a master degree in library and information science from the Universite de Montreal, Canada and has been in the library, computer and information industry for more than twenty three years. Before joining the Getty, Boughida was responsible for digital library products at Endeavor Information Systems in Des Plaines (Chicago, IL). Prior to his position with Endeavor, Boughida held senior positions in knowledge / records / information management in various sectors in Canada and an executive position in his native Algeria.

Steven Mandeville-Gamble, Associate University Librarian for Collections and Scholarly Communication, George Washington University

Steven Mandeville-Gamble is the Associate University Librarian for Collections and Scholarly Communication at The George Washington University. He has worked in academic research libraries as a professional librarian for more than 20 years. He served as head of Special Collections at GW, Principal Manuscripts Processing Librarian at Stanford University Libraries, and Records Specialist for Senator Alan Cranston Papers Project at UC Berkeley. He holds an AB in cultural anthropology from Stanford, M.A. in anthropology from University of Michigan, and M.L.I.S. in Library and Information Science from UC Berkeley.

Sarah Werner (Folger): Materiality of Texts and the Challenges of Digitalization

Sarah Werner, Undergraduate Program Director and Scholarly Outreach Coordinator, Folger Shakespeare Library

She writes a great deal about Shakespeare and modern performances of Renaissance drama. Her first book, Shakespeare and Feminist Performance: Ideology on Stage, was published by Routledge in 2001. Most recently, the collection she edited on New Directions in Renaissance Drama and Performance Studies was published by Palgrave. She is Associate Editor of Shakespeare Quarterly and Editor of The Collation, a blog about scholarship at the Folger. She was the guest editor for the Fall 2011 special issue of Shakespeare Quarterly on performance. It went through an open peer review process hosted by MediaCommons, which is one of the reasons that she is interested in scholarly publications and digital media. Some of the conversations that happened online were incorporated into the print version (“Rethinking Academic Reviewing”); much of the rest of the special issue looks like any other issue of SQ, but "it was an exciting process behind the scenes," wrote Dr. Werner. She was Assistant Professorial Lecturer in the Departments of English and of Theatre and Dance at George Washington University, 2000-2001.

Brett Hirsch (UWA Perth and De Montfort): Digital Editions, Editorial and Publishing Histories, and Computational Stylistics (Joining us via Skype)

Brett Hirsch, ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award Fellow, Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, University of Western Australia

Dr. Hirsch is coordinating editor of Digital Renaissance Editions. In 2013, he will take up a one-year Leverhulme Visiting Fellowship at the Centre for Textual Studies, De Montfort University (UK), to work on the authorship attribution studies team for the New Oxford Shakespeare. His current work in digital humanities includes computational stylistics studies of early modern drama (with Hugh Craig) and invited guest-editorship of a special issue of The Shakespearean International Yearbook on "DigitalShakespeares" (also with Hugh Craig). He previously co-convened the 2012 book:logic symposium on "Text Editing and Digital Culture," and his edited collection, Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices,Principles and Politics, was published by Open Book Publishers in December 2012.

 

12:15-1:15 pm ~ Lunch served to all participants in Post Hall, Mount Vernon Campus

 

1:15 pm-2:00 pm ~ The Digital and the Human

Sheila Cavanagh and Kevin Quarmby (Emory): "My English Breath in Foreign Clouds': The World Shakespeare Project and Global Communication

Sheila T. Cavanagh, Co-director, World Shakespeare Project, and Professor of English, Emory University

Dr. Cavanagh is the author of Cherished Torment: The Emotional Geography of Lady Mary Wroth's Urania (Duquesne, 2001) and Wanton Eyes and Chaste Desires: Female Sexuality in The Faerie Queene (Indiana, 1994). She is the Director of the Emory Women Writers Resource Project, which was awarded a major grant from the NEH. She is also Editor of The Spenser Review. With Kevin Quarmby, she co-founded The World Shakespeare Project, a new, interactive teaching and research model for twenty-first century higher education. Combining the practical and pedagogical resources of its Atlanta- and London-based co-directors, and applying theoretical and practical research procedures, the WSP links electronically with Shakespearean faculty and students across the globe to create and sustain dialogues and educational opportunities in concert with student populations often excluded from such endeavors because of economic, cultural, or geographic limitation.

Kevin Quarmby, Co-director, World Shakespeare Project, and Assistant Professor of English, Oxford College of Emory University

Dr Kevin A. Quarmby is Assistant Professor of English at Oxford College of Emory University, Georgia. Prior to his academic career, Quarmby was a professional actor in the UK. Away from the 'physical' classroom, Quarmby, along with his colleague, Dr Sheila Cavanagh, offers Internet-based Shakespeare, Text and Performance classes to Emory students on both the Oxford and Atlanta campuses, while also interacting live with students around the world. These courses allow students many thousands of miles apart to appreciate the performative impact of their studies. For the spring class of 2013, Sir Salman Rushdie has agreed to join this collaborative venture and will be attending classes in person and furthering group discussion. In recognition of these initiatives, Quarmby was created Shakespeare Performance Specialist in Virtual Residence at Emory's Center for Interactive Teaching. He is also Co-Director of the 'World Shakespeare Project', a live videoconferencing Shakespeare and performance teaching and research model. The 'World Shakespeare Project' is supported by the Halle Institute for Global Learning at Emory University, as well as Emory’s University Research Committee, which awarded the WSP its only ‘High Risk/High Benefit’ Grant of $50,000 in 2012.

Quarmby has published extensively in academic journals, including Shakespeare, Shakespeare Bulletin, ROMARD and Cahiers Elizabethain. In 2011, his article, 'Narrative of Negativity: Whig Historiography and the Spectre of King James in Measure for Measure', appeared in Shakespeare Survey, Volume 64 (2011), and his book, The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, was published by Ashgate in 2012. He is on the Editorial Board of The Map of Early Modern London. Quarmby is also editing William Davenant's Cruel Brother for Digital Renaissance Editions: Early Modern Drama Online, and co-editing with Dr Brett Hirsch the anonymous play, Fair Em. For 2013, he has collaborative chapters on digital Shakespeare in a forthcoming Cambridge University Press publication edited by Christie Carson and Peter Kirwan, and an article on digital pedagogy and research for a special edition of Shakespeare Yearbook.

Abstracts (Listed in the order of presentation)

Stay tuned; more abstracts to be posted soon.

Shoko Hamano, Visualizing Japanese Grammar: Opportunities Through and Challenges of Open Resources

In this presentation, I will discuss the effectiveness of digital resources in explaining deep conceptual aspects of a language to a wide audience and the challenges facing creators of such resources. For this purpose, I will first show a few examples of flash animations available at the site Visualizing Japanese Grammar and explain the benefits of such resources over other mediums. I will then explain how the website is utilized around the world and summarize the benefits of this resource from the users' point of view. This will be followed by the explanation of the work required to create such resources and a discussion of the challenges faced in their creation and dissemination.

Cathy Eisenhower and Ken Jacobs, Digital Poetry

Relegy is an application that provides writers with an alternative device for the composition of sets of glyphs. Originally conceived as a project to design an integrated development environment for the composition of poems, Relegy became a simple reconceptionalization of both the means of arranging and the presentation of glyphs. We will present a description of how the application is architected, the tools used, and some of the constraints and the compromises that were required to complete the project. We will finish with a brief description of the original performance and provide a sample of that performance with Cathy Eisenhower's composition.

John Bryant, TextLab, Sustainability, Collaborative Editing, and Melville's Billy Budd (Melville Electronic Library)

A significant challenge to digital scholarship is the problem of sustainability. While a book can last for centuries, even if only left on a shelf, a “critical archive” like the NEH-funded Melville Electronic Library (MEL), currently in development at Hofstra University, is sustainable only if an intergenerational community of scholars collaborates on its perpetual construction. The issue here is not simply that a group of people and institutions—scholars as well as IT specialist and librarians—need to maintain the site to ensure that certain switches are kept on or off and certain updates are made. Rather, sustainability is an issue because the principles of collaborative and fluid text editing, upon which MEL is founded, require constant updating of content and an ongoing discourse about that content. A fluid text is any written work that exists in multiple versions generated by the revisions or authors, editors, and adaptors. At MEL, we are developing a tool—called TextLab—that enables users to edit the probable revision sequences of a work’s multiple versions from manuscripts and print editions to adaptations. Because adaptations and adaptive revisions of works like Moby-Dick and Billy Budd arrive almost on a yearly basis, new content data must be added to the site’s editions that represent these works. At the same time, users are also able to store variant revision narratives of various sequences in the database, which in turn enables them to collaborate on a discourse field for continued debate about revision. The critical archive therefore serves not only as a place for storing ever-new data about Melville but also as an arena for training users in how to read fluid texts and a forum discussing the intricacies of a text in perpetual revision. To this end, MEL associates meet annually at MELCamps designed to create a community of young and older scholars to share insights on how to build the site and how to build perpetually out of each other. To underscore some of these concerns, I will demonstrate how TextLab currently works with regard to the fluid text editing of the Billy Budd manuscript and the problems facing the editing of adaptations of Billy Budd.

Candace Barrington (CCSU) and Jonathan Hsy (GWU): Global Chaucers

This presentation discusses methodological questions behind our "Global Chaucers" project, a long-term endeavor that begins with the creation of an online catalog of post-1945 non-Anglophone translations, adaptations, and appropriations of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. First, we will discuss the advantages of crowd sourcing for a project like ours. Not only have we already been able to construct a surprisingly diverse database with references to works in such non-Anglophone languages as Spanish, Farsi, Chinese, Japanese, and Esperanto, but we expect the website will eventually attract scholars and students wanting to study the global reception of early British literature. Second, we will turn to some of the productive challenges -- and opportunities -- we face as the catalog expands into an archive. One intriguing case study we will present is the work of French-Norwegian poet Caroline Bergvall. Her "Meddle English" language poetry blurs the boundaries between Modern English and Middle English, and many of her works announce themselves as Chaucerian adaptations. Her poetry not only provides an example of digital media used to publish a Chaucer adaptation, it also opens productive questions about the artificial boundaries we’ve created by foregrounding the categories of “non-Anglophone” and “adaptation.”

Peter Donaldson (MIT) and Alexa Huang (GWU): Global Shakespeares

Online digital video is being tapped as a research and pedagogic resource, marketing tool, and an art form with a symbiotic relationship with the stage. In fact, video is now the core of virtual environments, websites associated with theatre companies, and a small but rich array of scholarly digital archives. Characterised by unique dynamics and challenges, each of these three areas adds a new dimension to global Shakespeare in theory and practice. This talk, co-presented by the co-founders of Global Shakespeares, examines the methodological questions behind the video-centric archive and research project. The Global Shakespeares Video & Performance Archive is a collaborative project providing online access to performances of Shakespeare from the U.S., U.K., Europe, the Arab world, Latin America, India, and East Asia. The project also publishes peer-reviewed essays and metadata provided by scholars and educators in the field. The idea that Shakespeare is a global author has taken many forms since the building of the Globe playhouse. Our work honors the fact and demonstrates the diversity of the world-wide reception and production of Shakespeare’s plays in ways that we hope will nourish the remarkable array of new forms of cultural exchange that the digital age has made possible. Global Shakespeares is a participatory multi-centric networked model that offers wide access to international performances that are changing how we understand Shakespeare’s plays and the world. Global Shakespeares provides global, regional, and national portals to Shakespeare productions within a federated structure.

Melissa Malzkuhn, Achieving Linguistic Equality Through Sign Language Publishing: Gallaudet University's Deaf Studies Digital Journal

Deaf Studies Digital Journal is the world's only peer-reviewed publication in sign language. To date, DSDJ has over 100 contributors featuring content in different sign languages, including International Sign, with visits from over 95 countries. This talk will introduce the customized innovative features of Deaf Studies Digital Journal that made publishing scholarly work in sign language possible, highlight breakthroughs and unique works, and the role DSDJ has played in advancing linguistic equality for sign languages.

Will Noel, What Does Accessible Data Look Like?

The most useful digital data is stable, open data. An enormously diverse group of users need to be able to find it, access it in the form in which it was captured, ingest it easily, and use it as they want. What then, does open manuscript data actually look like? This paper discusses a model employed for the digital manuscripts of The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore.

Young-Key Kim-Renaud, Linguistic Diversity, Globalization, and Digital Revolutions

Globalization seems to threaten local customs, traditions, values and beliefs. From the scientific and socio-cultural points of view, maintaining linguistic and cultural diversity is an important issue. With the digital revolution, it has become possible to collect, analyze, and archive projects in a way that has never been possible before. I will discuss three important digital language projects: (1) the NEH-supported Arapesh Grammar and Digital Language Archive Project; (2) the joint Norwegian and Indian digital language description, knowledge representation and formal linguistics for Indic languages project; (3) the South Korean government funded Sejong Corpus.

Sheila T. Cavanagh (Emory) and Kevin Quarmby (Emory): "My English Breath in Foreign Clouds': The World Shakespeare Project and Global Communication

This talk will discuss the theory and practice shaping the World Shakespeare Project (WSP), a digital collaboration using live videoconferencing to link faculty, students, and arts practitioners in several countries, including the US, UK, India, and Morocco. The WSP recently established partnerships with two American Tribal Colleges and is in discussion with other partner institutions. The WSP uses Shakespeare as a medium for international communication, despite cultural, socioeconomic, or religious backgrounds.

Christy Desmet (UGA): Inventing Shakespeare on YouTube (Joining us via Skype)

Since 2006, amateurs and professionals alike have produced Shakespeare mashups, remixes, appropriations, and adaptations for YouTube. Youth and amateur culture have given us a viral proliferation of Lego Macbeths, Barbie Hamlets, and adolescent takes on Elizabethan sword-fighting from a variety of plays. There have also emerged more polished and extended efforts by independent filmmakers, enabled at least partly by the relaxation of length requirements for videos on the site and by ongoing interaction among videos. But how is the Author or Artist refigured when Shakespearean drama (and film) is remediated on YouTube? In this talk, I evoke Lev Manovich's somewhat controversial formulation of a dialectic between narrative and database in digital media as a starting point for exploring the metamorphosis of YouTube Shakespeare over the past five years. Through a posthuman interaction of narrative and database, we can see how invention works in YouTube Shakespeare to complicate both positive and negative characterizations of digital appropriation as artistic "theft." I'll focus on one or two examples, probably amateur takes on the Beatles' "Pyramus and Thisbe" skit and Second City's "Sassy Gay Friend" series.

Peter X. Feng (Delaware): Asian Americans and Media Consumption: On Audience Formations and New Television Modalities

The failure of AZN TV and ImaginAsian TV in the first decade of the 21st Century suggested that cable networks targeted at Asian Americans (5.6% of the U.S. population according to the 2010 Census) are not commercially viable. How does the rise of DVR "time-shifting," internet viewing, streaming to smart-phones, and other changing patterns of media consumption affect Television generally and the formation of racially-defined audiences specifically? This presentation, drawn from Feng's book-length study on Asian Americans and Television, discusses the role of online social networks and evolving media delivery infrastructures in constructing an audience for Asian American media and suggests that we may need to adjust our understanding of racial formations in the U.S.

Kathryn Kleppinger (GW): Reading Books on TV: Using Digital Archives to Study Novels and Their Reception

This presentation will focus on a current research project on television interviews with minority authors in France today. By performing a content analysis of the questions asked by journalists as well as of the responses given by authors, I show how these authors have been read in a limiting way, as eye-witnesses of contemporary social and political concerns, such as immigration and French identity. The authors who have received the most attention in the media are those who readily engage with these themes. As a result, their (often fictional) novels are largely read as sociopolitical documentation, rather than as works of art. This research challenges the relevance of many contemporary literary labels (including “postcolonial” and “francophone”), since the labels are applied only to works that coincide with preconceived, socially dominant notions of what they identify. Using digital media archives thus allows for a more nuanced understanding of the dynamics of minority literary publishing and reception and the use of labels within the field of literary studies.

Maida Withers (GW): Dancing with Digital Technologies

“Imagine artists as knowledge workers in an information economy, transforming ideas into experience.There is no final product, no end product, only a consistent striving towards a more perfect realization of an idea.”
Andy Horwitz, Founder Culturebot, NYC.

What are the possibilities of the “body art” of dance interacting with or embodying digital technologies to create meaning, expression through the arts?

Sample Videos:
Collision Course – a.k.a. Pillow Talk
Tzveta I
This has been a central question of my choreography since the early 1960s. The larger body of my work has related to visual phenomena creating interactvity for the viewer and also for the performing artist. The degree and nature of the interactivity is of interest to me whether it is based on simultaneous presentation, real-time interaction (cause and effect), immersive or other relationships for presentation. Through choreography and collaboration with visual artists, electronic composers/musicians, scientists, cyber artists, and other innovative thinkers, works have been created with laser beam, cyber world, and rotating loudspeaker installations, performances with dancers wearing wireless cameras, immersive works employing varied video installations, and dance film shorts of dance and digitized images. For me, all dance works are conceived as site-specific with the capacity to connect disparate things.

 

Josh Eyler (George Mason) and Jonathan Hsy (GW): Surveying a New Landscape: The Medieval Disability Studies Digital Glossary Project

This project grew out of a shared desire to provide an approachable online resource for Medieval Disability Studies, a burgeoning area of inquiry that currently traverses the boundaries of literature, history of science, history of medicine, and cultural studies. We also wanted to establish a collaborative venue that would be useful for students as well as interested members of the public, with the hope that the project could be expanded through crowdsourcing over time. In fall 2012, the Medieval Disability Studies Digital Glossary wikispace was established with an editorial team of eight scholars across different institutions. This presentation will explore the project’s development as a dynamic and evolving digital resource that provides entries on key terms for the study of disability in the Middle Ages. We will present a few sample entries from the project, and we will also explain some of the project's implications for teaching on the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Katherine Rowe, Shakespeare's The Tempest for iPad

What turns a humanist into a maker? In the context of a short demonstration of Shakespeare’s The Tempest for iPad, this talk sketches the pressures and opportunities that drew two early modernists into entrepreneurial software development, and the design and launch of a social reading app for mobile devices.

Kurt Fendt (MIT), Writing in the Margins: Annotations and Digital Pedagogy

Over centuries, writing notes in the margins of books and manuscripts has evolved as a common practice for readers to mark, memorize, or comment on relevant words, phrases, and passages. At the same time, these “reading traces” communicate one reader’s interaction with a text to other potential readers, even over distant periods of time. As much as annotation is a practice of reading is also closely connected to the process of learning. It’s a way to break up the text into manageable pieces or enhance it with notes that connect it to other readings. With more and more books and other humanities texts being available in digital forms, we need to develop ways to successfully translate such a straightforward yet powerful practice into an online space.

At MIT’s HyperStudio, a group of faculty, scholars, developers, and students have been working on a new digital annotation tool. Developed specifically for classroom use, Annotation Studio enables online, multimedia annotation of source documents by allowing users to collaboratively comment on a text at any scale (from a single word to an entire chapter, using different kinds of media). While other tools often focus on annotation for the purposes of historical scholarship or assume familiarity with technical standards such as TEI, Annotation Studio makes sophisticated analytic tools immediately accessible to students, with the aim of fostering skills in close reading and composition. Implemented in many MIT humanities classrooms over the past year, Annotation Studio has been used to support every step of the writing cycle, from students’ first engagement with primary sources to essay writing and revision. A discussion of the project's concepts will be followed by a demo and insights from the assessment in multiple humanities classes.

Karim Boughida (GW) and Steve Mandeville-Gamble (GW): Partners in Crime: Successful Library Strategies for 21st Century Research

The core mission of libraries has always been - and remains - to connect people with the information resources that they need to create new knowledge or to transform the world around them. In the print era, the strategies to meet those goals revolved around building vast reserves of print content and building services on that content. In the 21st Century, these strategies are losing saliency. Increasingly, successful library strategies must include teaching faculty and students how to identify and acquire data in multiple formats, how to "read" that data, how to manipulate it, and how to generate new knowledge based upon it. By being effective partners with faculty to ensure successful use of emerging methodologies of research and teaching, libraries will continue to play a vital role in the academic success of the universities in which they are embedded.

Jyotsna Singh (Michigan State): Digital Asian Reincarnations of Shakespeare

As the Bard’s plays continue to be performed via varied adaptations, translations, appropriations all across the world, making visible new dimensions of his works via local knowledge and “going native,” this process takes a further turn within globally and technologically mediated digital archives of live performance; a site I will examine here is Shakespeare Performance in Asia (SPIA). I will explore how traveling Shakespeares in digital reincarnations mediate native, ethnic traditions, though often in an already hybrid form, via new transnational technologies. My paper will explore these performances not simply as Shakespearean productions, but as distinctive cultural products of a technologically mediated global post-modernity.

Brett Hirsch (UWA Perth and De Montfort): Digital Editions, Editorial and Publishing Histories, and Computational Stylistics

This paper offers brief overviews of three different, but overlapping, digital projects: The Digital Renaissance Editions (DRE), which publishes electronic scholarly editions of early English drama and is modeled on the Internet Shakespeare Editions; Scholarly Editions of Early Drama in England (SEEDiE), which traces the editorial and publishing histories of early English drama since the eighteenth century; and "Beyond Authorship," a corpus-based computational stylistics study of latent trends and patterns in early modern English drama (with Hugh Craig).

Stay tuned; more abstracts to be posted soon.

Speakers and Moderators

Paul Berman, Vice Provost for Online Education and Academic Innovation, George Washington University

Professor Paul Berman, currently dean of the George Washington University Law School, will become vice provost for online education and academic innovation effective January 15, 2013. He takes on this new challenge as part of the university’s efforts to realize the great promise of online and hybrid education. This new position will help GW develop strategies for how to utilize new technologies to create innovative and effective programs for our students. During his tenure as dean, he has helped build strong ties between the Law School and the other schools by exploring new programs in key areas such as government contracting and intellectual property law. He has also developed stronger links to the members of the Law School's national advisory councils. Throughout his career, Professor Berman has distinguished himself as a driver and champion of innovation. Professor Berman is the author of numerous books and scholarly journal articles. His most recent book, Global Legal Pluralism: A Jurisprudence for Law Beyond Borders, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. He also is a sought-after speaker at invited lectures and at conferences and symposia nationwide. He is frequently cited as an expert in media, radio, and television outlets, including The Washington Post, The New York Times, Forbes, ABC News, NBC News, and the BBC.

Elaine Treharne, Professor of English, Stanford University

Professor Treharne's research and teaching focuses on English texts and manuscripts from c. 700 to 1200 and, in recent years, on Text Technologies from the earliest times to the present day. She is particularly interested in the materiality of the manuscript book, its tactile nature, and the multiple layers that make up the codex (its 'architexuality'). Current projects include The Sensual Book, analyzing the interactions between manuscripts and their users in England from 800 to 1200, manuscripts’ digital reproduction and the theoretical implications of touch and the 'voluminous'. In this work, she emphasizes English and, to a lesser extent, Latin and French texts entered into margins and blank spaces by those who actively engaged with the manuscripts. Elaine is also writing the Oxford Very Short Introduction to Medieval Literature (OUP, 2013); planning a book on Borders in Anglo-Saxon England; editing the new four-volume Encyclopaedia of Book History: Manuscript, Print and Digital Technologies for Wiley-Blackwell (2014); and researching Beauty and the Book: Arts and Crafts to Modernism, 1890-1940, on Edward Johnston, Eric Gill and David Jones.

Katherine Rowe, Director of the Katharine Houghton Hepburn Center, Director of Digital Research and Teaching, and Chair and Professor of English, Bryn Mawr College

A Renaissance scholar with an interest in media history and adaptation, Katherine Rowe was described by The New York Times as one of “a small vanguard of digitally adept scholars ... rethinking how knowledge is understood and judged” in a story about her work as the guest editor of a special issue of the journal Shakespeare Quarterly that experimented with open scholarly review. She is Associate Editor of the Cambridge World Shakespeare Online, an international resource being developed by Cambridge University Press and the University of Southern California with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. With colleagues at Haverford and Swarthmore, she is a founder of the Tri-Co Digital Humanities initiative. She has written several books and numerous articles on Renaissance drama, Shakespeare adaptation, and media change. With Elliott Visconsi, she co-founded The Luminary Tempest, an iPad app.

Janelle Jenstad, Associate Professor of English, University of Victoria, Canada

Professor Jenstad directs The Map of Early Modern London (MoEML), a SSHRC-funded project that maps the streets, sites, and significant boundaries of late sixteenth-century and early seventeenth-century London (1560-1640). Taking the Agas map as its platform, the project links encyclopedia-style articles, scholarly work, student work, editions, and literary texts to the places mentioned therein. A versioned edition of Stow's 1598, 1603, and 1633 texts of A Survey of London is forthcoming. In Dec. 2011, she was appointed Assistant Coordinating Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions. Her publications include essays and chapters in Elizabethan Theatre, The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Early Modern Literary Studies, Shakespeare Bulletin, The Silver Society Journal, Institutional Culture in Early Modern Society (Brill), Shakespeare, Language and the Stage (Arden Shakespeare), Approaches to Teaching Othello (MLA), Performing Maternity in Early Modern England (Ashgate), New Directions in the Geohumanities: Art, Text, and History at the Edge of Place (Routledge), and Teaching Early Modern English Literature from the Archives (MLA, forthcoming).

Kurt Fendt, Executive Director, MIT's HyperStudio: Laboratory for Digital Humanities

Dr. Fendt is Principal Research Associate in Comparative Media Studies and Executive Director of MIT's HyperStudio - Laboratory for Digital Humanities. He teaches a new project-based digital humanities course and a range of upper-level German Studies courses in Foreign Languages and Literatures. Fendt has held Visiting Professorships at the University of Cologne, the Technical University of Aachen (both Germany), and the University of Klagenfurt, Austria; in 2001 he was Visiting Scientist at the Fraunhofer Institute in Sankt Augustin, Germany. He is co-Principal Investigator of several digital humanities projects such as the US-Iran – Missed Opportunities project, the Comédie-Française Registers project, and co-Director of Berliner sehen, a collaborative hypermedia learning environment for German Studies. Since 2005, he has been organizing the MIT European Short Film Festival. Before coming to MIT in 1993, Fendt was Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Linguistics at the University of Bern in Switzerland, where he earned his Ph.D. in modern German literature with a thesis on hypertext and text theory in 1993 after having completed his MA at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, Germany.

Peter S. Donaldson, Ford Foundation Professor in the Humanities, MIT

Dr. Donaldson was educated at Columbia (BA 64, PhD 74) and Cambridge (BA 66 MA 70), where he held the Euretta J. Kellett Fellowship. His early research on the convergence of Machiavellian and sacred politics led to the publication of Machiavelli and Mystery of State (Cambridge U Press, 1988). Since the late 1980s he has focussed on two major research areas: Shakespeare on Film (Shakespearean Films/Shakespearean Directors and a series of articles now being revised for a book on Shakespeare and Media Allegory) and electronic projects involving Shakespeare across media. These include the Shakespeare Performance in Asia and Global Shakespeares digital video archives (both co-founded and co-edited with Alexa Huang), Shakespeare Electronic Archive, Hamlet on the Ramparts and XMAS: Cross-Media Annotation System, which supports the use of DVDs, images, and texts in student on-line discussions, in class presentations and multimedia essays. Donaldson has also been a pioneer in the use of media-rich presentations for scholarly and intepretive use. Donaldson is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (UK), has held research fellowships from the NEH and ACLS, and was the first Lloyd Davis Visiting Professor of Shakespeare Studies at the University of Queensland, Australia (2006).

Peter X. Feng, Associate Professor, University of Delaware

Peter X Feng received his B.A. in American Studies from Yale University and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Film Studies from The University of Iowa, and currently serves as the Associate Chair of English. He was Chancellor's Distinguished Visiting Professor of Film Studies at UC-Irvine (1997-98) and a member of the Advisory Board for Wayne State University Press' Contemporary Approaches to Film and Media Series since 2003. Dr. Feng has published articles in Cinema Journal, Cineaste, Amerasia Journal, Jump Cut, Camera Obscura, and elsewhere. Screening Asian Americans (2002), a collection of essays on Asian Americans and Film, was published by Rutgers University Press; Identities in Motion: Asian American Film and Video (2002), was published by Duke University Press. Dr. Feng teaches courses in Theory, Asian American Literature, and Film Studies: recent courses include "Sex and Violence in Asian American Literature," "Texts and Contexts: Movies, Novels, Comics," "The Hollywood Musical," and the graduate seminar "Narrating Race, Narrating Nation."

William Noel, Director of University of Pennsylvania Libraries' Special Collections and Founding Director of Center and Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies

A distinguished art historian committed to open access, Noel has groundbreaking experience in the application of digital technologies to manuscript studies. He has directed an international program to conserve, image and study the Archimedes Palimpsest, the unique source for three treatises by the ancient Greek mathematician (www.archimedespalimpsest.org). The UPenn Rare Book and Manuscript Library serves faculty and students across the Penn campus and around the world. He joined U Penn from his post as curator of manuscripts and rare books at The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. Among his books are The Harley Psalter (1995), The Oxford Bible Pictures (2005), and The Archimedes Codex (2007). An advocate for open manuscript data, during his tenure the Walters began to release full digital surrogates of its illuminated medieval manuscripts under a creative commons license. After receiving his PhD from Cambridge University, England in 1993, Dr. Noel held positions at Downing College, Cambridge University, as director of studies in the history of art, and at The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, as assistant curator of manuscripts. Email wgnoel@upenn.edu

Sarah Werner, Undergraduate Program Director and Scholarly Outreach Coordinator, Folger Shakespeare Library

She writes a great deal about Shakespeare and modern performances of Renaissance drama. Her first book, Shakespeare and Feminist Performance: Ideology on Stage, was published by Routledge in 2001. Most recently, the collection she edited on New Directions in Renaissance Drama and Performance Studies was published by Palgrave. She is Associate Editor of Shakespeare Quarterly and Editor of The Collation, a blog about scholarship at the Folger. She was the guest editor for the Fall 2011 special issue of Shakespeare Quarterly on performance. It went through an open peer review process hosted by MediaCommons, which is one of the reasons that she is interested in scholarly publications and digital media. Some of the conversations that happened online were incorporated into the print version (“Rethinking Academic Reviewing”); much of the rest of the special issue looks like any other issue of SQ, but "it was an exciting process behind the scenes," wrote Dr. Werner. She was Assistant Professorial Lecturer in the Departments of English and of Theatre and Dance at George Washington University, 2000-2001.

Yunah Hong, Filmmaker

Ms. Hong is an award winning filmmaker who lives in New York City. She studied art history, photography and design at Seoul National University, graduating in 1985. Two years later she earned an M. A. in computer graphics at the New York Institute of Technology. She has made eight films, ranging in scale from a one-hour documentary to short experimental productions. Her documentary, “Between the Lines: Asian American Women’s Poetry” (2001) shows how the work of Asian American woman poets reflects their lives. It received a CINE Golden Eagle Award in 2002. Her latest, “Anna May Wong: In Her Own Words” is scheduled to broadcast on PBS Plus in the States, on May 2013. She has also published an article about Wong, “A Twentieth Century Actress: A conversation with Yunah Hong and Peter X. Feng” in Quarterly Review of Film and Video, Routledge in 2006.

Lily Wong, Assistant Professor Department of Literature, American University

Dr. Wong received her PhD in Comparative Literature at University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research pays close attention to the politics of affect/emotion, gender and sexuality, as well as media formations of transpacific Chinese and Sinophone communities. She has published in journals including Asian Cinema, Pacific Affairs and China Review International, and book chapters in World Cinema and the Visual Arts (Anthem Press, 2012). She recently gave a paper at the 2012 Association for Asian Performance conference entitled "Over My Dead Body: Affective Economies of Anna May Wong and Ruan Ling-yu."

Ryan Cordell, Assistant Professor of English, Northeastern University

Dr. Cordell's scholarship focuses on the intersections between literary, periodical, and religious culture in antebellum America. He is building a digital edition of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story “The Celestial Railroad” in American periodicals during the 1840s and 50s. He serves on NITLE’s Digital Humanities Council as secretary/treasurer of the Digital Americanists scholarly society. He is also on the board of the DHCommons project. DHCommons aims to combat isolation in the digital humanities by connecting people with expertise with digital projects that need that expertise. He writes about technology in higher education for the group blog ProfHacker at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Candace Barrington, Professor of English, Central Connecticut State University

Dr. Barrington has long-term interests in Chaucer reception, particularly the presence and uses of The Canterbury Tales in American popular culture. Her innovative book, American Chaucers, was published in 2007 and has been supplemented by articles examining the appropriation of Chaucer by You-Tube, children's picture books, New Orleans' Mardi Gras, African-American poets, and veterans of the American Civil War. Beyond these research interests, Barrington has a long-standing commitment to collaboration: co-editing two essay collections, co-authoring essays, as well as holding campus- and statewide leadership roles (such as shepherding for four years Central Connecticut State University’s Faculty Senate and restoring its credibility as a instrument for effective shared governance). She is working with Jonathan Hsy on Global Chaucers, a multi-national, multi-lingual project to locate, catalog, translate, archive, and analyze translations and appropriations of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, with a focus on non-Anglophone adaptations dating after 1945.

John Bryant, Professor of English, Hofstra University

Dr. Bryant's principal research focus is on nineteenth-century American literature and culture, in particular the works of Herman Melville but also, transcendentalism, Emerson, Poe, and antebellum African American writing. He also specializes in textual studies and digital scholarship, paying special attention to how writers and readers revise texts—making them into what he calls “fluid texts”—and how scholars might use online technology to show users how fluid texts evolve. He is the editor of Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies and of the Melville Electronic Library. The Melville Electronic Library is projected to be the first born-digital online resource for Melville studies, texts, research, and teaching. Housed in Hofstra University's server, MEL is organized by a group of internationally-known Melville scholars and digital specialists. With NEH funding, MEL's primary focus in its first two years of development has been to establish scholarly "fluid-text" editions of three focal works: Moby-Dick, Battle-Pieces, and Billy Budd.

Melissa Malzkuhn, Coordinator, Community Engagement, Gallaudet University

Melissa Malzkuhn is the Digital Innovation and Media Strategies Manager at the Science of Learning Center on Visual Language and Visual Learning (“VL2”, vl2.gallaudet.edu) at Gallaudet University, in Washington D.C. VL2 is a premier research center on how deaf children learn to read through using the visual modality, encompassing the following disciplines: neurocognitive science, biology, linguistics, psychology, socio-cultural, and pedagogy. Malzkuhn leads projects translating research findings into educational resources. She was the Managing Editor of Deaf Studies Digital Journal, a peer-reviewed online digital journal in sign language, from 2008 to 2012. She currently serves as an Executive Editor. Malzkuhn received her MA in Deaf Studies with a concentration in Cultural Studies from Gallaudet.

Sheila T. Cavanagh, Co-director, World Shakespeare Project, and Professor of English, Emory University

Dr. Cavanagh is the author of Cherished Torment: The Emotional Geography of Lady Mary Wroth's Urania (Duquesne, 2001) and Wanton Eyes and Chaste Desires: Female Sexuality in The Faerie Queene (Indiana, 1994). She is the Director of the Emory Women Writers Resource Project, which was awarded a major grant from the NEH. She is also Editor of The Spenser Review. With Kevin Quarmby, she co-founded The World Shakespeare Project, a new, interactive teaching and research model for twenty-first century higher education. Combining the practical and pedagogical resources of its Atlanta- and London-based co-directors, and applying theoretical and practical research procedures, the WSP links electronically with Shakespearean faculty and students across the globe to create and sustain dialogues and educational opportunities in concert with student populations often excluded from such endeavors because of economic, cultural, or geographic limitation.

Kevin Quarmby, Co-director, World Shakespeare Project, and Assistant Professor of English, Oxford College of Emory University

Dr Kevin A. Quarmby is Assistant Professor of English at Oxford College of Emory University, Georgia. Prior to his academic career, Quarmby was a professional actor in the UK. Away from the 'physical' classroom, Quarmby, along with his colleague, Dr Sheila Cavanagh, offers Internet-based Shakespeare, Text and Performance classes to Emory students on both the Oxford and Atlanta campuses, while also interacting live with students around the world. These courses allow students many thousands of miles apart to appreciate the performative impact of their studies. For the spring class of 2013, Sir Salman Rushdie has agreed to join this collaborative venture and will be attending classes in person and furthering group discussion. In recognition of these initiatives, Quarmby was created Shakespeare Performance Specialist in Virtual Residence at Emory's Center for Interactive Teaching. He is also Co-Director of the 'World Shakespeare Project', a live videoconferencing Shakespeare and performance teaching and research model. The 'World Shakespeare Project' is supported by the Halle Institute for Global Learning at Emory University, as well as Emory’s University Research Committee, which awarded the WSP its only ‘High Risk/High Benefit’ Grant of $50,000 in 2012.

Quarmby has published extensively in academic journals, including Shakespeare, Shakespeare Bulletin, ROMARD and Cahiers Elizabethain. In 2011, his article, 'Narrative of Negativity: Whig Historiography and the Spectre of King James in Measure for Measure', appeared in Shakespeare Survey, Volume 64 (2011), and his book, The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, was published by Ashgate in 2012. He is on the Editorial Board of The Map of Early Modern London. Quarmby is also editing William Davenant's Cruel Brother for Digital Renaissance Editions: Early Modern Drama Online, and co-editing with Dr Brett Hirsch the anonymous play, Fair Em. For 2013, he has collaborative chapters on digital Shakespeare in a forthcoming Cambridge University Press publication edited by Christie Carson and Peter Kirwan, and an article on digital pedagogy and research for a special edition of Shakespeare Yearbook.

Christy Desmet, Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professor of English and Director of the Writing Center's First-year Composition Program, University of Georgia

Her book Reading Shakespeare's Characters: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Identity was published in 1992 by the University of Massachusetts Press and reprinted as an electronic book by netLibrary in 2000. She is the co-editor (with Robert Sawyer) of Shakespeare and Appropriation (Routledge, 1999) and of Harold Bloom's Shakespeare (Palgrave, 2001). With Sujata Iyengar, she is co-founder and co-general editor of Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation. Her research interests include Shakespeare and New Media/Web 2.0, the rhetoric of reading and writing English history, theory, practice, and assessment of ePortfolios, and teaching writing and literature in digital contexts.

Jyotsna G. Singh, Professor of English, Michigan State University, East Lansing

Dr. Singh has written on digital global and regional Shakespeare archives for the forthcoming Cambridge World Shakespeare Encyclopedia, and has has published extensively on early modern drama and culture, with an emphasis on Shakespeare; cross-cultural performances/appropriations of Shakespeare; early modern travel narratives; history of race and gender; and colonialism. Her recent books include Travel Knowledge: European 'Discoveries' in the Early Modern Period (co-edited Ivo Kamps, Palgrave, 2001) and A Companion to the Global Renaissance: English Literature and Culture in the Era of Expansion (editor, Blackwell 2009). She has received several research fellowships at the Folger Shakespeare Library; a Distinguished Faculty Fellowship at Queen Mary, University of London (2008), and a Long-term Research Fellowship at the John Carter Brown Library, Brown University (2010-11). The photo of Dr. Singh on the left was taken at Dalai Lama's monastery.

Joshua R. Eyler, Associate Director, Center for Teaching Excellence, George Mason University

Upon receiving his Ph.D. in Medieval Studies from the University of Connecticut in 2006, Dr. Eyler moved to a position in the English department at Columbus State University in Georgia. After being approved for tenure at CSU, his love for teaching and desire to work with instructors from many different disciplines led him to the field of faculty development and to George Mason University, where he is currently an Associate Director of the Center for Teaching and Faculty Excellence as well as an Affiliate Associate Professor of English. He has published broadly on medieval literature, and his edited collection Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations was published by Ashgate in 2010. His eclectic research interests include brain-based learning theories, Chaucer, and disability studies.

Brett Hirsch, ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award Fellow, Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, University of Western Australia

Dr. Hirsch is coordinating editor of Digital Renaissance Editions. In 2013, he will take up a one-year Leverhulme Visiting Fellowship at the Centre for TextualStudies, De Montfort University (UK), to work on the authorship attribution studies team for the New Oxford Shakespeare. His current work in digital humanities includes computational stylistics studies of early modern drama (with Hugh Craig) and invited guest-editorship of a special issue of The Shakespearean International Yearbook on "DigitalShakespeares" (also with Hugh Craig). He previously co-convened the 2012 book:logic symposium on "Text Editing and Digital Culture," and his edited collection, Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Practices,Principles and Politics, was published by Open Book Publishers in December 2012.

Maida Withers, Professor of Dance, George Washington University

Maida Withers (Choreographer, dancer, filmmaker, Professor) Born in Kanab, Utah, Maida studied Dance and Theatre at Brigham Young University (BA) and Dance and Education at the University of Utah (MS). She is the Founding Artistic Director of Maida Withers Dance Construction Company (MWDCCo) and a Professor in the Department of Theatre and Dance, The George Washington University. Since the 1960s Maida has dedicated her life to the creation, development, and distribution of contemporary work. Maida is recognized internationally for her large-scale multimedia performances, the fresh and often sensual and robust movements that brand her performances, and her ongoing interest and recognition in experimentation and innovation with dance and technology. Maida’s tours internationally include Guatemala, France, Netherlands, Japan, Croatia, China, Hong Kong, India, Korea, Brazil, Finland, Venezuela, Mexico, Poland, Germany, and others with sponsorship of U.S. Embassies and the U.S. Department of State, Trust for Mutual Understanding, others. Her dance film shorts have been shown in Germany, Australia, Brazil, and India; California, South Carolina, Washington, DC, Utah, Chicago, and Arlington. Recent awards include the Life-time Achievement Award – Festival in the Desert (2010); Arlington County Fellowship for Filmmaking “Portraits in Dance” (2010); Commission from Research Channel Grant, “Data to Dance, Documentary Film (2008); Pola Nirenska Lifetime Achievement Award (2006); 2006 Metro DC’s highest award annually for dance, “Outstanding Overall Production in a Large Venue;” 2006 Washington DC Mayor’s top prize for “Distinction in a Discipline;” Dance Place Award for Lifelong Achievement in Education, Maida Withers Dance Construction Company will celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2014.

Kathryn Kleppinger, Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies, George Washington University

Professor Kleppinger completed her PhD in the Joint program in French literature and French Studies at New York University in 2011. Her teaching and research interests center around contemporary French and Francophone literature, in particular how writing from outside metropolitan France influences and shapes conceptions of the French literary canon. Her current book project, tentatively titled Why the Beur Novel? Authors and Journalists Interact to Construct a New French Voice studies the television and radio reception of novels written by the children of North African immigrants to France.

Christopher Sten, Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. Sten's teaching and scholarly interests focus on the American novel, Melville, race and ethnicity, transnationalism, visual culture, Modernism, and writing about Washington, DC. Much of his research and writing has centered on Herman Melville, and in recent years, a good deal of his professional life has been devoted to service in the Melville Society and the Society’s Cultural Project and Archive at the New Bedford Whaling Museum in Massachusetts. His current research focuses on Melville’s short fiction and on a study of adaptations, appropriations, and “remixing” of Melville’s texts in various media, including “new media.” His books include Literary Capital: A Washington Reader (edited, University of Georgia Press, 2011), “Whole Oceans Away”: Melville in the Pacific (coedited, Kent State University Press, 2007), Sounding the Whale: MOBY-DICK as Epic Novel (Kent State University Press, 1996) and The Weaver-God, He Weaves: Melville and the Poetics of the Novel (Kent State University Press, 1996).

Jeffrey Cohen, Director of the Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute and Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. Jeffrey Jerome Cohen's research explores what monsters reveal about the cultures that dream them; how postcolonial studies, queer theory, postmodernism and posthumanism might help us to better understand the texts and cultures of the Middle Ages; methods for discerning the complicated lives of what is supposed to be inanimate; and ecological theory. "Stories of Stone," his current project, is funded by fellowships from the ACLS and the Guggenheim Foundation, and investigates the liveliness of our most seemingly inert substance. He founded the group blog In the Middle, where along with Jonathan Hsy and others he is an active blogger. He contributed to the blog and book, Geoffrey Chaucer Hath a Blog.

Cathy Eisenhower, Humanities and Instruction Librarian, Gelman Library, George Washington University

She has published articles on library instruction and critical pedagogy, a collection of poems, clearing without reversal (2008), from Edge Books, and would with and, a second collection, is forthcoming from Roof Books. She works closely with the GWU women's studies program on "Women in and Beyond the Global: An Open-Access Feminist Project" and has played a key role in starting a pilot of open-access scholarly publishing at Gelman Library. Her areas of expertise include U.S. and Latin American women's poetry, pedagogy, translation, and fugitive publishing. She has designed a number of online research guides.

Ken Jacobs

Ken Jacobs has lived in and about Washington D.C. for more than thirty years. A chapbook, Sooner, from Phylum Press was released in December 2009. He has poems in The Portable Boog Reader, the online journal Everyday Genius, the journal Sentence, as well as an essay in a special issue of Damn the Caesars. He has a series of poems forthcoming in Wheelhouse Magazine. He also designed, produced, and wrote the software for the collaborative digital poetry project Relegy, which he performed with M. Magnus and Cathy Eisenhower in the Spring of 2011.

Shoko Hamano, Director of the Language Center and Professor of Japanese and International Affairs, George Washington University

Dr. Hamano is an award winning professor of Japanese. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropological Linguistics in 1986 from the University of Florida. In March, 2011, Professor Hamano and her colleague Wakana Kikuchi-Cavanaugh, won the MERLOT Award for Exemplary Online Learning Resources for their "Visualizing Japanese Grammar" learning materials. Dr. Hamano received GW's Trachtenberg Prize for Teaching in 2004. Her publication includes The Sound-Symbolic System of Japanese (CSLI, 1998); Making Sense of Japanese Grammar (University of Hawaii Press, 2002); and Intermediate Japanese: A Grammar and Workbook (Routledge,2011).

Karim Boughida, Associate University Librarian for Digital Initiatives and Content Management, George Washington University

He is leading different new campus-wide initiatives like Cyberinfrastructure Digital Scholarship Center. He is a public speaker and the general co-chair of JCDL 2012 (Joint Conference on Digital Libraries) hosted by GW and the Library of Congress. Before joining GW, he was senior information systems architect specializing in digital library and information architecture at the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA. Boughida holds a master degree in library and information science from the Universite de Montreal, Canada and has been in the library, computer and information industry for more than twenty three years. Before joining the Getty, Boughida was responsible for digital library products at Endeavor Information Systems in Des Plaines (Chicago, IL). Prior to his position with Endeavor, Boughida held senior positions in knowledge / records / information management in various sectors in Canada and an executive position in his native Algeria.

Steven Mandeville-Gamble, Associate University Librarian for Collections and Scholarly Communication, George Washington University

Steven Mandeville-Gamble is the Associate University Librarian for Collections and Scholarly Communication at The George Washington University. He has worked in academic research libraries as a professional librarian for more than 20 years. He served as head of Special Collections at GW, Principal Manuscripts Processing Librarian at Stanford University Libraries, and Records Specialist for Senator Alan Cranston Papers Project at UC Berkeley. He holds an AB in cultural anthropology from Stanford, M.A. in anthropology from University of Michigan, and M.L.I.S. in Library and Information Science from UC Berkeley.

Young-Key Kim-Renaud, Chair of the East Asian Languages and Literatures Department, Professor of Korean language and Culture and International Affairs, faculty member of the Linguistics Program, George Washington University

Dr. Kim-Renaud is the initiator and a co-convener of the annual Hahn Moo-Sook Colloquium in the Korean Humanities series at GW. Before joining GW, she served as Assistant Program Director for Linguistics at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). She is past President of the International Circle of Korean Linguistics and has been the Editor-in-Chief of its journal, Korean Linguistics, since 2002. A theoretical linguist with a broad interest in the Korean humanities and Asian affairs, she has published ten books, including Creative Women of Korea: From the Fifteenth Century to the Twentieth Century (Sharpe, 2003), And So Flows History, an English translation of Hahn Moo-Soo's Korean original, Yosanun hurunda (Univ. of Hawaii Press, 2005), and Korean: An Essential Grammar. She has received several major research awards and grants, including three Fulbright awards, twice for Korea and once for Jordan. She has won individual research grants from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Social Science Research Council, and other foundations.

Robert McRuer, Chair and Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. McRuer’s work focuses on queer and crip cultural studies and critical theory. He recently won the Alan Bray Memorial Book Award for his book Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability. Since Prof. McRuer began to further his unique research in the combined fields of queer and disabilities studies, he has also edited an anthology, taught at GW, and continued to develop his ideas. Although the book is written for a scholarly audience, Prof. McRuer expressed his delight that people outside the academic world are finding the book accessible and meaningful.

Patricia Chu, Deputy Chair and Associate Professor of English, George Washington University

Dr. Patricia Pei-chang Chu (Ph.D. in English literature, Cornell University) teaches courses on contemporary Asian American literature and culture, women’s autobiography, and contemporary American literature. She is interested in the ways Asian American writers claim subjectivity and citizenship through writing. Her current work concerns narratives of “return,” representations of diasporic subjects’ journeys to their or the ancestors’ Asian homelands. Her book Assimilating Asians: Gendered Strategies of Authorship in Asian America was published by Duke University Press in 2000.

Joe Fruscione, University Writing Program, George Washington University

Dr. Fruscione is adjunct professor of English at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and adjunct assistant professor of First-Year Writing at George Washington University. He has been teaching literature and writing at the university level since August 1999. He did his undergraduate work at the University of Delaware (BA, 1996) and graduate work at George Washington University (PhD, 2005). His fields of interest are 19th and 20th century American literature and culture, film, and adaptation studies. He has also written on Ralph Ellison's complex relationship with Hemingway in an essay from the new collection Hemingway and the Black Renaissance (eds. Gary Holcomb and Charles Scruggs, Ohio State UP 2012). He recently published an extensive dual biography chronicling the competition between two of America’s legendary writers. Faulkner and Hemingway: A Biography of a Literary Rivalry (Ohio State University Press, 2012) is the first book-length work analyzing the relationship between these two luminaries.

Holly Dugan, Associate Professor of English, George Washington University

Professor Dugan's research and teaching interests explore relationships between history, literature, and material culture. Her scholarship focuses on questions of gender, sexuality, and the boundaries of the body in late medieval and early modern England. She is currently working on a book-length project, co-authored with Scott Maisano, that examines the pre-modern history of primatology through the lens of Shakespeare. Her book The Ephemeral History of Perfume: Scent and Sense in Early Modern England (Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011) investigates the influence of olfaction in early modern England.

Jonathan Hsy, Assistant Professor of English, George Washington University

Professor Hsy's current research investigates multilingualism and commerce in medieval England and France, but his interests extend into later fields and periods, including early print culture, postcolonial theory, and the history of the English language. His new book Trading Tongues: Merchants, Multilingualism, and Medieval Literature is forthcoming from Ohio State University Press. He is woring with Candace Barrington on Global Chaucers, a multi-national, multi-lingual project to locate, catalog, translate, archive, and analyze translations and appropriations of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, with a focus on non-Anglophone adaptations dating after 1945. He is also a member of the Editorial Committee for the Medieval Disability Glossary Wiki associated with the Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages. Since fall 2012, he has been an active blogger at In the Middle, a group blog that features regular contributions by Jeffrey Cohen and others.

Daniel DeWispelare, Assistant Professor of English, George Washington University

Professor DeWispelare received his PhD in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory from the University of Pennsylvania, and does research primarily in the British nineteenth century, with a focus on Romanticism, articles on which he has published in the Journal of British Studies, the Journal of Literature and Theology, and Cabinet Magazine: A Quarterly of Art and Culture. Mainly, he is interested in tracing the mechanisms by which the English language spread around the globe while simultaneously justifying that spread as legitimate. Before joining GW, he was Visiting Assistant Professor at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey.

Alexa Huang, Director of the Dean's Scholars in Shakespeare Program and Associate Professor of English, Theatre and Dance, East Asian Languages and Literatures, and International Affairs, George Washington University; Co-General Editor, The Shakespearean International Yearbook; General Performance Editor, Internet Shakespeare Editions; Research Affiliate in Literature at MIT.

Recipient of the MLA's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange (Columbia UP), she chairs the MLA committee on New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare, which sponsors the Digital Challenge. She is also the co-founder and co-director, with Peter Donaldson, of Global Shakespeares. Part of her work focuses on racial histories that connect imaginative writing to performances, which led to the publications of Shakespeare in Hollywood, Asia and Cyberspace (co-edited) and Class, Boundary and Social Discourse in the Renaissance (co-edited), and a special issue of Shakespeare (Journal of BSA, forthcoming). Her second monograph Weltliteratur und Welttheater: Ästhetischer Humanismus in der kulturellen Globalisierung was published by Transcript Verlag in 2012 (available on Amazon.com). She has contributed to The Luminary Tempest, an iPad app, ed. Katherine Rowe and Elliott Visconsi.

Directions, Parking, and Hotels

The symposium will be held at George Washington University in three separate locations:

 

1. Thursday, January 24, 2013, GWU School of Media and Public Affairs Building, Room #310, 805 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC

Walking Directions from Warshington Marriot to Media and Public Affairs Building

 

2. Friday, January 25, 2013, Jack Morton Auditorium, Ground floor of GWU School of Media and Public Affairs Building, 805 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC

Walking Directions from Warshington Marriot to Media and Public Affairs Building

 

3. Saturday, January 26, 2013, Post Hall Terrace, Academic Building / Post Hall, George Washington University Mt. Vernon Campus, 2100 Foxhall Road Northwest, Washington, DC 20007

Click Here for a map of the GWU Mt. Vernon campus

 

Saturday's events will be held in Post Hall on the Mt. Vernon campus of The George Washington University. Please click HERE for directions to the Mt Vernon campus. Post Hall is located of the main floor of the Academic Building. The Vern Express offers free rides between the two campuses throughout the day. It leaves from in front of Funger Hall at 2201 G Street NW (between 22nd and 23rd Streets) in Foggy Bottom.

 

The official conference hotel is Washington Marriott, 1221 22nd Street NW · Washington, DC 20037

Tel: 1-202-872-1500 [Map] -- NOTE: conference is held on campus, not at the hotel

If you are not a speaker but would like to stay at this hotel, you can still take advantage of the conference rate of $119 per night. Call the hotel and mention that you are here to attend the symposium at GW. Marriott's event coordinator is Sue Sayyad. You may also contact Emily Russell, erusse4@gwmail.gwu.edu if you have any questions.

Foggy Bottom is full of good lunch options!

Click here for a restaurant map

 

Foggy Bottom Campus Public Transportation Options:

http://www.neighborhood.gwu.edu/transcurrentfactsheet.pdf

George Washington University's Foggy Bottom campus is centrally located three blocks from the White House. The Foggy Bottom GWU Metro Stop, located on the Blue and Orange Lines, is right on our Foggy Bottom Campus at 21st and I Streets, NW. See the campus map below.

Click on the following Metro map for a full map of the DC Metro system:

 

Click here for GW campus maps

Nearest metro station: Foggy Bottom/GWU metro station; across the street from the Whole Food's and GW Hospital.

 

 

Visitor Parking

http://parking.gwu.edu/

Parking on campus is currently a challenge due to ongoing construction, so we strongly encourage the use of public transportation. If you choose to drive to GW, a limited number of visitor parking spaces is available in --

The Academic Center Parking Garage (801 22nd Street, NW; entrance on I Street, NW, between 21st and 22nd Streets); open 24 hours a day 7 days a week

The Marvin Center Parking Garage (800 21st Street, NW; entrance on H Street, NW, between 21st and 22nd Streets); open 7 days a week from 7 a.m. until midnight daily

The parking fee is $18 per day or for a portion of the day (subject to change). On-campus street parking is available, but it is also limited and time limits are strictly enforced.

A few public parking garages (not run by GW) are also available nearby. Click here for a detailed map.

 

Hotels on or near the GW Foggy Bottom Campus(all within walking distance):

OFFICIAL CONFERENCE HOTEL: Washington Marriott (NOTE: conference is held on campus, not at the hotel)

http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/waswe-washington-marriott/

 

George Washington University Inn

http://www.gwuinn.com/

 

One Washington Circle Hotel

http://www.thecirclehotel.com/

 

Hotel Lombardy

http://www.hotellombardy.com/

 

State Plaza Hotel

http://www.stateplaza.com/

 

DoubleTree Guest Suites Hotel

http://www.downtowndchotel.com/

 

Renaissance Washington DC (Dupont Circle)

http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/wasrw-renaissance-washington-dc-dupont-circle-hotel/

 

Best Western Georgetown

http://www.georgetowndchotel.com/

 

The River Inn

http://www.theriverinn.com/

 

Washington Suites Georgetown

http://www.washingtonsuitesgeorgetown.com/

 

Fairmont Washington, D.C.

http://www.fairmont.com/washington

 

Click on the following map for details:

 

 

More options here: http://www.gwu.edu/explore/visitingcampus/lodgingdining

 

 

Note: Rosslyn (Arlington, VA)--across the river--has some great hotels at affordable rates, and it is only one stop from Foggy Bottom-GWU by metro (and these hotels are next to the Rosslyn metro)

 

Options in Rosslyn include: Hyatt, Marriott, Holiday Inn, Hotel Palomer, Best Western, Residence Inn, Courtyard, and more.

 

Contact

 

Emily Russell, erusse4(at)gwmail(dot)gwu(dot)edu

 

or


Department of English
The George Washington University
801 22nd Street NW, Suite 760
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: (202) 994-6180

Registration





 

 

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Friday Morning Sessions, 1/25
Friday Afternoon Sessions, 1/25
Saturday Morning Sessions, 1/26

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We have gone mobile! For those with smart phones, download our free conference app. You'll find schedule, abstracts, essential info, and maps in the app for Android, iPhone, and iPad.

 

*

 

The symposium is co-organized by Alexa Huang, Jonathan Hsy, Daniel DeWispelare, Patricia Chu, and Emily Russell and initiated by Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute and Dean's Scholars in Shakespeare Program. Special thanks to Steven Lerman, Paul Berman, Geralyn Schulz, Robert McRuer, Jeffrey Cohen, Joe Fruscione and Connie Kibler for their support. GW MEMSI brings the study of early Europe within a global perspective to students (from undergraduate to doctoral), teachers and researchers, and an interested public.

 

The symposium is co-sponsored by George Washington University Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, Dean's Scholars in Shakespeare Program, Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Department of English, Disability Support Services, Department of Computer Sciences, University Libraries, University Honors Program, University Writing Program, Writing in the Disciplines, Women's Leadership Program, Department of Theatre and Dance, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, and GW Language Center. Graduate seminar taught in conjunction with the symposium: English 6130 Digital Humanities Theory (Prof. Huang).