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University Bulletin: Undergraduate Programs The George Washington University  

 
   
 

ELLIOTT SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Dean M.E. Brown

Associate Deans H. Agnew, M. Mochizuki, D. Shaw

The Elliott School of International Affairs offers graduate and undergraduate programs to prepare individuals for understanding and working in an increasingly globalized world. The historical roots of the Elliott School extend back to the establishment of the School of Comparative Jurisprudence and Diplomacy in 1898. In 1966, the School separated from the School of Government, Business, and International Affairs to become an independent unit, the School of Public and International Affairs. In 1987, the name was changed to the School of International Affairs, and in 1988 the School was renamed in honor of Evelyn E. and Lloyd H. Elliott. Lloyd Elliott was the President of The George Washington University from 1965 to 1988.

The Degree of Bachelor of Arts

The Elliott School offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with majors in international affairs, Asian studies, Latin American and hemispheric studies, and Middle East studies. These programs provide a broad liberal arts education and depth in historical and contemporary issues in international affairs. The programs are interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, combining courses offered through the School with courses offered by other schools and departments of the University.

Residence

Students must complete at least 60 credit hours in residence. In addition to requirements listed under University Regulations, students wishing to transfer from another division of the University into a degree program in the Elliott School must have completed 24 credits at GW with a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or above at the time of transfer. Except in well-documented extenuating circumstances, at least 9 of the final 15 hours must be completed in residence.

Academic Standing

In order to graduate, a student must complete 120 credit hours with a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0. Courses in lifestyle, sport, and physical activity are not counted toward the degree

Semester Warning—A student whose cumulative grade-point average is less than 2.0 after attempting a minimum of 12 credit hours is placed on semester warning at the end of the semester and is required to take corrective measures, including limitation of course load to no more than 13 credit hours. A student on semester warning will be placed on probation if, after attempting an additional 12 credits, the cumulative GPA remains below 2.0. For part-time students and those enrolled in the summer, a semester is interpreted to mean a time interval in which at least 12 credits have been attempted.

Probation—A student whose cumulative grade-point average is less than 2.0 but at least 1.0 any time after having attempted a minimum of 24 credit hours is placed on probation. A student will be continued on probation if, after the initial semester on probation, the cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 but is above 1.0. For part-time students and those enrolled in summer sessions, a semester is interpreted to mean a time interval in which at least 12 credit hours have been attempted. A student on probation is limited to no more than 13 credit hours of course work per semester. A student is returned to good standing if the cumulative GPA is at least 2.0 after completion of at least 12 additional credits.

Suspension—Failure to resume or reach a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 after two successive semesters on probation results in suspension. A student whose cumulative grade-point average falls below 1.0 any time after having enrolled in a minimum of 24 credit hours as a student in the Elliott School will be suspended. Students who are suspended for poor scholarship may apply for readmission after the lapse of one fall or spring semester. To be considered for readmission, the student must submit evidence to the Dean’s Council of conduct during absence from the University which indicates that the student will profit from readmission. A student suspended twice for poor scholarship will not be readmitted.

Dean’s Honor List—The name of every student who attains a 3.75 grade-point average in course work is placed on the Dean’s Honor List for that semester. Appearance on the list is limited to full-time students registered for a minimum of 15 credit hours with letter grades in a given semester and to part-time students registered for a minimum of 15 credit hours with letter grades over a period of two consecutive semesters, which may include a summer term.

Timely Progress Toward the Degree—Students who fail to make adequate and timely progress toward the degree, through repeated leaves or repeated failure to complete an appropriate number of credits per semester, may be dismissed from the University (see Right to Dismiss Students under University Regulations). Students dismissed on these grounds may apply for readmission after supplying sufficient evidence of academic promise.

Special Honors—In addition to the general requirements stated under University Regulations, a candidate for Special Honors in an Elliott School major must have attained a 3.7 grade-point average overall and complete with an A– or above either an Elliott School or Honors senior seminar, or an Elliott School or Honors senior thesis. Students must apply for honors candidacy by the beginning of the senior year through the Office of Academic Advising and Student Services.

Curriculum Requirements for the First Two Years

Curriculum requirements for Elliott School students in the freshman and sophomore years are listed below. Consult gwu.edu/~elliott/academics/ugrad before choosing courses to fulfill these requirements. Information on earning credit by examination or waiving curriculum requirements is available from academic advisors in the Elliott School.

As a basis for all Elliott School B.A. programs, students take IAff 1005, Econ 101112, PSc 1001, Hist 1011, and Anth 1002 or Geog 1001. In addition, all students take (1) UW 1020; (2) 3 credits of math courses; (3) 3–4 credits of science courses; (4) 9 credits of humanities or 6 credits of humanities and 3 credits of creative arts courses.

Requirements for the Majors

For the four Elliott School majors, lists of designated courses that fulfill major requirements are found at elliott.gwu.edu/academics/ugrad. With approval of the advisor or program director, pertinent Special Topics or other courses may be taken in place of those listed.

International Affairs—Required courses for the major: Econ 2180 or 218182; one upper-division course selected from designated lists for each of the following: research methods (from Anth, Econ, Geog, PSc, Psyc, Soc, Stat); international or comparative politics (from PSc or IAff); historical analysis of U.S. foreign policy (from Hist); an Anth or Geog course. All international affairs majors must demonstrate third-year proficiency in an appropriate modern foreign language by course work or examination.

Each student must take two regional foundational courses covering different regions and 15 credit hours of additional course work in either a functional or regional concentration. The functional concentrations are international politics; international economics; comparative political, economic, and social systems; international development; contemporary cultures and societies; conflict resolution; security policy; global public health; international environmental studies. The regional concentrations are Africa, Asia, Europe and Eurasia, Latin America, Middle East.

Asian Studies—Required courses for the major: IAff 2091; Econ 2151, 2169, or 2170; three courses selected from a list of approved history and culture courses; two approved courses selected from PSc 2369 through 2475 and Geog 3165; one course in Asian literature; and three upper-division Asia-related courses, selected in consultation with the program director. The program must include a research methods course and a regional foundation course on a region other than the student’s major. Completion of third-year–level language study in an approved Asian language is required.

Latin American and Hemispheric Studies—Required courses for the major: IAff 2090; Econ 2185; PSc 2383 or 2484; Geog 3161; Hist 3710 or 3711; Anth 3702, 3812, or 3814; one approved course in Spanish-American literature. Four additional upper-division courses dealing with Latin American and Hemispheric studies and selected in consultation with the program director; two of these courses are selected from international affairs, and two from anthropology, art history, economics, geography, history, political science, and Hispanic literatures. The program must include a research methods course and a regional foundation course on a region other than the student’s major. Completion of third-year–level language study in Spanish (Span 2006) or another approved foreign language is required.

Middle East Studies—Required courses for the major: IAff 2040 (Middle East) as a foundation course; two courses selected from Hist 2803, 2804, 3060, 3801, 3810, 3811; two courses selected from PSc 2476, 2377, 2478, 2379; two courses selected from Rel 1009, 3211, 3231, 3401, 3414, 3475, 3431, 3481; a course selected from Econ 2136, 2151, 2180, 218182; a literature course selected from Arab 4001, 4002; Clas 3101, 3102, 3201; or Hebr 40012; and two additional courses related to the Middle East from any discipline, selected in consultation with the program director. The program must include a research methods course and a regional foundation course on a region other than the student’s major. Completion of third-year–level language study in Arabic (Arab 3301 or 3302), Hebrew (Hebr 3301 or 3302), or Persian (Pers 3002) is required.

General Elliott School Policies

Scholarship Performance in the Major—All courses indicated as Requirements for the Majors (see above), including third-year language proficiency, must be completed with grades no lower than C. If a student receives a grade of D+, D,or D− in any of these courses, the credit will count toward the degree, but the student must either repeat the course or, with approval of the academic advisor, substitute another course, in either case with a grade no lower than C. If the student must repeat the course, credit for the repetition does not count toward the degree, and grades for both the initial course and the repeated course are used to compute the GPA. If the Office of Academic Advising allows another course to be substituted, the initial course is considered to be an elective. The student is expected to consult the Office of Academic Advising in all matters affecting the program of study, such as changes, substitutions, withdrawals, or transfer of credit from other institutions.

Incompletes—Conditions under which the symbol I (Incomplete) may be assigned are described under University Regulations. Incomplete course work must be completed no later than one calendar year from the last day of the examination period of the semester or summer session in which the indication of I was assigned. When work for the course is complete, the grade earned will be indicated in the form of I, followed by the final grade. The indication of I cannot be removed from the transcript. An indication of I that is not changed within this period automatically becomes an IF. The I cannot be changed by reregistering for the course at GW or by taking its equivalent elsewhere. In cases of well-documented extenuating circumstances, an instructor and a student may jointly petition the Dean’s Council for additional time in which to complete the work of the course. Such petitions should be submitted within a year of the assignment of the I. Students will not be permitted to register for any additional course work if they have more than two Incompletes on their record.

Pass/No Pass Option—A student who has a cumulative grade-point average of 2.5 or better may, with the approval of an advisor and the dean, take one course per semester and receive a grade of P, Pass, or NP, No Pass, which will be recorded on the student’s transcript but will not be reflected in the cumulative grade average. A student must sign up for such an option at the Office of Academic Advising within the first eight weeks of classes. Under no circumstances may a student change from pass/no pass status to graded status, or vice versa, after the end of the eighth week of the semester. Foreign language courses and required courses in the student’s degree program (except those in which the grade of P or NP is normally assigned) may not be taken on a pass/no pass basis. Freshmen may not elect to take a course on a pass/no pass basis. A transfer student may not elect to take a course on a pass/no pass basis until the second semester of enrollment in the University. No more than six courses in which the grade of P or NP is assigned will apply toward the degree, including courses in which the grade of P or NP is normally given.

Academic Work Load—The normal academic work load for a full-time student is 15 credit hours. A full-time student not on probation may take a course load of up to 17 credit hours. A student with a strong academic record may take up to 18 credit hours with the approval of the Office of Academic Advising (additional tuition charges apply). Students doing internships or working are advised to reduce their course load.

Study Abroad—Students are encouraged to travel and study abroad. Those wishing to study abroad must consult their academic advisor and the University’s Office for Study Abroad. A maximum of 34 credits may be transferred in from study abroad. GW courses taken abroad for GW credit do not apply to this maximum (i.e., specific courses taken through GW Study Centers and GW Summer Abroad for which students receive GW credit as opposed to transfer credit). Students must secure prior approval from the Office of Academic Advising for any plan of study abroad if the credit earned is intended to apply to the degree program in which they are registered. Students must apply to a program from the University’s List of Study Abroad Programs. A catalogue or other description of the study abroad program must be presented for consideration together with detailed descriptions of the courses to be taken. See Study Abroad Programs.

Internships—Internships offer students the opportunity to make practical use of the knowledge they acquire in the classroom. Undergraduates who have completed at least 30 credit hours and have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.5 are eligible to arrange internships for credit (to a total maximum of 6 credits toward the degree). Transfer students are not eligible to arrange internships for credit until their second semester at GW. Academic work in the field of the internship is required. A zero-credit internship is also available. Internships are available in the private, nonprofit, and public sectors. Students must register for internships (even if for zero credit) through the Office of Academic Advising but are responsible for locating their own internships; listings are posted at gwired.gwu.edu/career.

Double Majors—Students who complete the requirements of two majors in the Elliott School (such as international affairs and Asian studies) may graduate with a double major. Consult the Office of Academic Advising to officially declare both majors on the appropriate form.

Students in the Elliott School may take a second major offered by Columbian College of Arts and Sciences or the School of Engineering and Applied Science (majors in communication, English and creative writing, journalism and mass communication, and political communication are excluded). Permission for the second major must be obtained from the appropriate administrative office of the other school.

Students in Columbian College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering and Applied Science may take a second major in the Elliott School. Students wishing to pursue these options must request approval through the Elliott School Office of Academic Advising. Students must complete all degree requirements for their major in their home school in order to graduate with a second major from the other school.

In all cases, double majors do not result in two degrees. See Double Majors and Double Degrees under University Regulations.

Secondary Fields of Study—Elliott School students can take a secondary field of study, such as business, economics, or languages, in other schools of the University. Students from other schools of the University can take a secondary field of study in international affairs in the Elliott School. Contact the Office of Academic Advising in the Elliott School.

 

 

The George Washington University

© 2013 University Bulletin
The George Washington University All rights reserved.

Information in this bulletin is generally accurate as of fall 2012. The University reserves the right to change courses, programs, fees, and the academic calendar, or to make other changes deemed necessary or desirable, giving advance notice of change when possible.