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Current Exhibitions

Expansive Visions: GW Collection Past, Present, Future
Ongoing
Organized by the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery and presented at the
GW Museum and The Textile Museum


AlmaThomas
Image: Alma Thomas, Nature's Red Impressions, 1968, acrylic on canvas, 51" x 49-1/2".
Gift of the artist, 1968.

Art collections are made up of more than just objects; they consist of stories of people, cities and institutions. The George Washington University began building its collection of art in 1821. It now owns more than 4,000 drawings, paintings, prints, photographs and sculptures. This exhibition presents highlights of GW's collection specifically selected to trace the university's history and evolution as a presenter of contemporary art as well as an institution of training for artists and humanists now and in the future; a charge made more tangible through GW's recent merger with the Corcoran School of Art and Design. Presented in addition to the exhibitions at the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery, this selection is an opportunity for the public to view works from the university's collection in a different setting.

Works in the exhibition include works by Washington Color School notables such as Gene Davis, Howard Mehring and Alma Thomas; alongside newer acquisitions from artists such as Michael Craig-Martin, Robin Rose and Susan Roth. Included is an interactive timeline demonstrating the almost 50 year impact of the Dimock and Luther W. Brady Art Galleries to the history of art in D.C.

This exhibition is organized by the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery with the support of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum staff. Partial support for the exhibition was provided by the Frances and Leonard K. Burka Fund for the Arts, the Friends of the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery and Meredith Mickelson.

A lecture on Art in Washington in the 1960s will be given by Meredith Mickelson on July 14, 2016 at 4:00 pm. More details can be found here

GW Collection Pops-Up in 2000 Pennsylvania Avenue!
Ongoing

For a limited time, works from the GW Permanent Collection are on view in a space in 2000 Pennsylvania Avenue, a DC Landmark listed in the US National Register of Historic Places. Chosen to complement Expansive Visions: GW Collections Past, Present, Future - currently on view in the GW Museum and The Textile Museum. That exhibition presents selected highlights of GW's collection that trace the university's history and evolution as a presenter of contemporary art.

Building Knowledge: Traditional African Art from the GW Permanent Collection
MPA Building, 1st floor cases
Through July 15, 2016


Building Knowledge Makonde Tree of Life
Image: Tree of Life, Makonde people, ebony root wood, h: 39".

This exhibition highlights examples of traditional African art from the GW Permanent Collection, the majority of which was assembled from the gifts of just a handful of donors in the 1970s, with little information accompanying them. Since that time, the study of African art and culture has progressed a great deal with new interpretations, and students and scholars have contributed to the information on the collection's pieces extensively.

The discovery of a large Makonde "Tree of Life" sculpture found in collection prompted us to highlight other African pieces from the collection and conduct more research to build on the information we have. You can follow along with us during the research process on Twitter @BradyGallery with #MakondeToL and on our blog Found In Collection.

Toyokuni ga: Japanese Woodblock Prints by Utagawa Kunisada
MPA Building, 2nd floor cases
Through August 1, 2016


Utagawa Kunisada

Image: Utagawa Kunisada, An Elegant Swordsman at Suma, 1853 [detail], woodblock print,
20-1/2" x 15-1/4". Gift of Dr. Stuart A. Umpleby, 2002.
The George Washington University Permanent Collection, P.03.8.6.



Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865) was one of the most popular print designers of his time. Despite his prolific production, success and enduring popularity in Japan, Western scholars have largely forgotten the name Kunisada in favor of his more famous contemporaries. This selection of prints, gifted in 2002 by Professor Emeritus Stuart A. Umpleby to the GW Permanent Collection, represents a range of Kunisada's work, from actor prints to scenes from The Tale of Genji to the art of flower arranging (ikebana), all dating to the 1840s and 1850s. Examples of some objects pictured in the prints, such as sake cups and kaishi or pocket papers are also presented alongside the prints.

Upcoming Exhibitions

Along the Eastern Road: Hiroshige's Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido

August 24 - December 2, 2016

Hiroshige, Mariko
Image: Utagawa Hiroshige, 20th Station: Mariko, circa 1833-34 from "Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido Road," woodblock print, courtesy Reading Public Museum, Reading, Pennsylvania.

Utagawa Hiroshige (Japanese, 1797-1858) lived in the midst of the Edo era and was known as the foremost artist of the topographical landscape. His artistry, recorded in a brilliant woodcut series, portrayed scenic views along the famous "Eastern Road" that linked Edo (Tokyo) with Kyoto, the ancient imperial capital of Japan. Hiroshige traveled along the historic Tokaido in 1832 and visited the fifty-three towns and villages that dotted the road. The route was traveled by merchants, religious pilgrims, and tourists, not to mention processions of the daimyo and their retinue. Hiroshige relished portraying all types of people: the aged, the beautiful, the busy merchant, and the lofty Samurai, and all were schematically represented with great wit and gentle compassion. Along the Eastern Road: Hiroshige's Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido is organized by the Reading Public Museum, Reading, Pennsylvania.

Recent Exhibitions

The Other 90%: Works from the GW Permanent Collection

March 16 - June 3, 2016

Norman Rockwell, Portrait of a Man

Image: Norman Rockwell, Portrait of a Man, c. 1929, oil on canvas, 34 x 20 inches.
Gift of Frank B. Hand, Jr.


Coloring Pages: Works from the Corcoran Collection of Artists' Books

January 19 - March 25, 2016

Coloring Pages
With winter now making its appearance, we look for other sources of warmth in these sometimes-dreary months. Artists' books from the Corcoran Art & Design Collection showcase color and color imagery in the pages of their work. Some stories are told completely through color; others, though they might use muted palettes, create a sensation with words that paint images of colorful scenes. These bright pages serve as a complement to the exhibition Color Bloc: Paintings by Elizabeth Osborne, on view in the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery through February 26, 2016.

The exhibit displays only a sampling of artists' books from the Art & Design Collection from the Corcoran. These and many others can be viewed in the Special Collections Research Center at GW's Gelman Library. Visit http://library.gwu.edu/scrc to find out more.

Color Bloc: Paintings by Elizabeth Osborne

December 9, 2015 - February 26, 2016

Elizabeth Osborne, Portrait

Image: Elizabeth Osborne, Audrey in Profile, 2014, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches.
James A. Michener Art Museum. Museum purchase funded by Bonnie O'Boyle and the Mandel Society for Art Acquisitions and partial gift from Locks Gallery.


Veils, blocks, bands and wavy strokes of color are the hallmark of Elizabeth Osborne's paintings. Whether fully abstract or punctuated by the artist's treatment of the figure and objects, Osborne's paintings show a skillful handling of color and command of her technique. Osborne typically paints on a canvas laid on the floor. This technique enables her to perfect a wavy brush stroke, which has become her signature. The rich color juxtapositions and linear compositions evident in her work can be likened to Washington Color School painters such as Gene Davis, Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland.

Osborne was a professor at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts from 1963-2011 and has influenced a generation of painters and artists. The Brady Gallery exhibition is derived from the Veils of Color exhibition organized by the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Unique to the Washington show, loans from the artist and Locks Gallery in Philadelphia round out the exhibition. The Friends of the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery provided partial funding for the exhibition.

Absence/Presence: Selected Contemporary Photography

August 26 - November 20, 2015
How does one measure emptiness and can it be measured? Images that are devoid of people give us a taste of what we leave behind when we take a step away: an abandoned bowling alley, a stark prison cell, or an empty desk. They imply a sense of absence, but they are far from empty and the human presence is visible and felt. Featuring works from the GW Permanent Collection and various lenders, this exhibition explores the traces of human presence left behind in 'unpeopled' photographs of interiors and other spaces, whether temporarily empty, permanently abandoned, or made to appear so by the photographer's viewpoint or photographic processes. Artists include Nancy Breslin, William Christenberry, Cynthia Connolly, Lisa Tyson Ennis, Frank Gohlke, Dean Kessmann, Bridget Sue Lambert, Dan Lobdell, Pablo Maurer, Andrew Moore, E. Brady Robinson, Lee Saloutos, Katherine Sifers, and Trine Søndergaard.
Partial funding provided by the Francine Zorn Trachtenberg Photography Fund and the Friends of the Luther W. Brady Art Gallery.

Andrew Moore, Bowling Lanes, Governors Island Nancy Breslin, Queen Mary II

Above left: Andrew Moore, Bowling Lanes, Governors Island, NY, 2001, Chromogenic Print, 40 x 50 inches. Photo courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery. Above right: Nancy Breslin, Queen Mary II, Deck Chairs, 2015, ultrachrome pigment print, 15 x 15 inches. Photo courtesy of the artist.

To view past exhibitions please view our Exhibition Archive


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