WID Courses - Spring 2005

Last Updated: 11/15/05 | 6:35 pm

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Courses Titles

AH 110W.80 Euro Art of Late 19 th Cent., Robinson
66371 TR 14:20-15:35 Max 15

ANAT 701W.80 Writing for Bio Medical Sciences, Johnson
67041 MW 11:00-12:00 Max 15

AMST 72W.10 Intro to Am St., McAlister
66855 MW 11:10-12:00 Max 15

AMST 72W.30 Discussion
66857 R10:00-10:50 Max 15

ANTH 2W.80 Sociocultural Anthropology, Gardner
66322 M 9:35-10:50, F 8:00-9:15 Max 20

ANTH 2W.30 Discussion
66323 M 12:45-13:45 Max 20

CLAS 72W.80 Roman Lit & Civ, Fisher
66571 MW12:45-14:00 Max 15

ECON 121W.80 Money and Banking, Stekler
66280 TR 15:55-17:10 Max 20

ECON 162W.80 Public Finance, Watson
66281 WF 9:35-10:50 Max 20

ECON 195W.80 Micro Pub Pol Anal, Goldfarb
66290 TR 14:20-15:35 Max 20

ENG 52W.80 Intro Brit Lit, Plotz
66415 MW 12:45-14:00 Max 15

ENG 81W Intro to CW [ALL SECTIONS], McAleavey & staff
66440 11 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15, Abrams
66441 12 MW 12:45-14:00 Max 15, Cabral
66442 13 WF 9:35-10:50 Max 15, Wallace
66443 14 TR 15:55-17:10 Max 15, Clair
66444 15 MW12:45-14:00 Max 15, Ziegler
66445 16 TR 8:00-9:15 Max 15, Maliszewski
66446 17 MW8:00-9:15 Max 15, Gutstein
66447 18 WF 9:35-10:50 Max 15, Ziegler
66448 19 MF 15:55-17:10 Max 15, Poliner
66449 20 MF 11:10-12:25 Max 15, MacKinnon
66450 21 WF 9:35-10:50 Max 15, Chandra
66451 M1 MW 10:00-11:15 Max 15, Pollack
66452 M2 MW 13:00-14:15 Max 15, Sobeloff

ENG 100W.80 Intermediate Writing, Alcorn
67118 MF 11:10-12:25

ENG 101W.80 Advanced Comp, Schreiber
66534 TR 15:55-17:10 Max15

ENG 103W.10 Interm. Fiction, Chandra
66453 W 11:10-12:25, F 12:45-14:00 Max 15

ENG 103W.11 Interm. Fiction, Clair
66454 11 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15

ENG 103W.12 Interm. Fiction, Abrams
66457 12 TR 15:55-17:10 Max 15

ENG 103W.13 Interm. Fiction, Chandra
66455 13 WF 14:20-15:35 Max 15

ENG 104W.10 Interm. Poetry, Wallace
66458 10 M 14:20-15:35 Max 15

ENG 104W.11 Interm. Poetry, Shore
66461 11 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15

ENG 104W.12 Interm. Poetry, MacKinnon
66459 12 WF 9:35-10:50 Max 15

ENG 105W.80 Fund. Of Dramatic Writing, Stokes
66465 10 M 15:30-18:00 Max 15

ENG 106W.10 Interm. Fiction, II, Mallon
66462 10 M 14:20-15:35, W 15:55-17:10 Max 15

ENG 106W.11 Interm. Fiction, II, Clair
66463 11 TR 12:45-14:00 Max 15

ENG 107W.10 Interm. Poetry, II, McAleavey
66467 10 TR 12:45-14:00 Max 15

ENG 108W.80 Interm. Dram. Writing, Griffith
66469 W 15:30-18:00 Max 15

ENG 116W.10 Adv. Fiction, Moskowitz
66470 MW 12:45-14:00 Max 15

ENG 181W.10  Creative Writing Workshop, Hackett
60386 Max 15

HONR 42W.10 Sociocultural Anthropology, Shepherd
67026 MF 11:10-112:25
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

HONR 45W.10 Intro Comp Politics, O'Gara
67027 TR 12:45-14:00
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

HONR 52W.10 Honors Intro to Creative Writing, Fred Pollack
67028 MW 12:45-14:00
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

HONR 175W.10 Politics and Architecture, Harding
67110 T 16:10-18:00
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

HMSC 701W.10 Community and Identities, Ramlow
66363 10 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15

HMSC 701W.30 Discussion
66364 30 W 12:45-13:45 Max 15

HUM 1W.80 Roots of the Western Tradition, Raphael
66835 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15

IAFF 94W.80 Europe: Inter & Dom Interactions, Sodaro
67025 TR 15:55-17:10 Max 25

IAFF 190W.80 Lit of Conflict, Grier
67023 TR 9:35-10:50 Max 20

MATH 91W.10 Math as a Language, Abrams
66340 MF 11:10-12:25 Max 20

PHIL 51W.10 Intro to Philosophy, Romanovskaya
66361 TR 9:35-10:50 Max 8

PHIL 701W.MV Adv Critical Thinking & Writing, Friend
66358 TR 16:10-17:25 Max 8

PHYS 22W.10 University Physics II, Berman
66416 10 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 54

PHYS 22W.30 Lab and Recitation
66417 30 R 17:10-19:00 Max 18

PHYS 22W.31 Lab and Recitation
66418 31 R 19:10-21:00 Max 18

PHYS 22W.32 Lab and Recitation
66419 32 F 11:10-13:00 Max 18

PSC 190W.80 Chinese Pol and Foreign Relations, Shambaugh
66626 MW 12:45-14:00 Max 8

PSC 190W.81 Women & Pol in Comp Perspective, Wolchik
66630 T11:10-13:00 Max 8

PSYC 11W.MV Abnormal Psych, Schell
66194 MW 10:00-11:15 Max 15

REL 185W.10 Early Daoist Religion, Michael
66362 TR 15:55-17:10 Max 20

SPAN 54W.80 Tragedy & Comedy in Hispanic World, Britt
66169 TR 9:35-10:50 Max 13

SPHR 71W.80 Foundations of Human Communication, Richards
66752 M 9:35-10:50, F 8:00-9:15 Max 15

TRDA 191W.80 Dance History, Buckley
66642 TR 12:45-114:00 Max 15

WSTU 120W.10 Introduction to Women's Studies, Morris
66438 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 20

Courses Descriptions

Art 110 European Art of the Late 19th Century Prof. L. Robinson
Examination of the revolution in style of Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism in the context of Western European political, social, and cultural developments. Emphasis on representative styles of Courbet, Manet, Monet, Morisot, Degas, Seurat, Cezanne, Van Gogh, and Gauguin.

American Studies 72 Introduction to American Studies Prof. M. McAlister
U.S. history and culture, from 1890 to 2000. This course examines social movements, cultural developments, and political history, with particular attention to the politics of race, the history of immigration, the construction of gender, and the global position of the U.S. NOTE: WID Students must register for AMST 72W.30, the WID discussion section.

Anatomy 701 Writing for the Bio Medical Sciences Prof. K. Johnson
An undergraduate course for students preparing for the bio medical professions. Students will complete a personal memoir exploring their developing interest in the biomedical sciences; an expository essay; an essay on a biomedical controversy; and a review of a biomedical science book.

Anthropology 2 Sociocultural Anthropology Prof. A. Garner
Survey of the world's cultures, illustrating the principles of cultural behavior. NOTE: WID Students must register for ANTH 2W.30, the WID discussion section.

Classics 72 Roman Literature and Civilization Prof. E. Fisher
Study of Roman civilization with focus on public and private life as seen primarily through literature.

Economics 121 Money and Banking Prof. H. Stekler
The role of money, credit, interest rates, foreign exchange rates, and commercial banks and other financial institutions in the U.S. economy.

Economics 162 Public Finance, II Prof. H. Watson
Economic analysis of taxes and government deficits. Topics include individual and corporate income taxes, payroll taxes, sales and excise taxes, property and wealth taxes, design of tax systems, and effects of taxation on labor and capital markets.

Economics 195 Special Topics: Micro Public Policy Analysis Prof. R. Goldfarb
This course shows how the microeconomic analysis in Econ 11 can be used to analyze a large variety of public policy issues. A selection of such issues will be chosen from a list that includes prescription drug re-importation, vaccination policy, teacher shortages, regulation of smoking, the Microsoft antitrust case, airline deregulation, subsidization of the arts, immigration policy, and others.

English 52 Introduction to British Literature Prof. J. Plotz
Representative works of major authors studied in their historical context, discussion of recurrent themes and introduction to various types and forms of imaginative literature in the 19 th and 20 th centuries.

English 81 Introduction to Creative Writing
An exploration of genres of creative writing (fiction, poetry, and/or playwriting). Basic problems and techniques; examples of modern approaches; weekly writing assignments; workshop and/or conference discussion of student writing.

English 100 Intermediate Writing Prof. M. Alcorn
This course offers instruction in intermediate writing and responds to the needs of each class of students. The focus is on training students in the writing of argumentative papers, analytic papers, exploratory essays, and research papers. Students will do work in writing workshops, with emphasis on revision.

English 101 Advanced Writing Prof. E. Schreiber
This advanced writing course helps develop written expression by analyzing various types of writing and their uses. Assignments emphasize the writing process (prewriting, writing, and revision) as well as clarity of expression and audience. Throughout the semester, students work on one topic related to their field of interest, major, or future work, and consider it in different formats. Individualized instruction and frequent conferences.

English 103 Intermediate Fiction I
The writing of fiction. This course involves reading literary models, written and oral peer critiquing, and the writing of two revised, finished short stories. Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 103 Intermediate Fiction I
The writing of fiction. Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 104 Intermediate Poetry I
The writing of poetry. Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 105 Fundamentals of Dramatic Writing
A workshop in playwriting and screenwriting, with emphasis on dramatic structure. Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 106 Intermediate Fiction II
The writing of fiction. Prerequisite: Engl 103 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 107 Intermediate Poetry II Prof. D. McAleavey
The writing of poetry. Prerequisite: Engl 104 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 108 Intermediate Dramatic Writing Prof. P. Griffith
A workshop developing scripts for both theatre and film. Prerequisite: Engl 105 or equivalent.

English 116 Advanced Fiction
Further workshop study of the writing of fiction. Prerequisite: Engl 106 or equivalent.

English 117 Advanced Poetry
Further workshop study of the writing of poetry. Prerequisite: Engl 107 or equivalent.

English 181 Creative Writing Workshop
Taught by the Jenny McKean Moore Writer in Washington. Prerequisite: a 100-level creative writing course.

Honors 42 Honors Sociocultural Anthropology Prof. R. Shepherd
An accelerated introduction to the study of cultures that emphasizes field research. Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 45 Honors Introduction to Comparative Politics Prof. M. O'Gara
An introduction to the field of comparative politics, focusing primarily on the concept of political development within states and across regions. We will compare states, nations, and various sub-state actors(such as multinational corporations and terrorist movements) while continually progressing toward a sophisticated understanding of the nature, processes, and effects of globalization. Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 52 Honors Introduction to Creative Writing
An exploration of genres of creative writing (fiction, poetry, and/or playwriting). Basic problems and techniques; examples of modern approaches; weekly writing assignments; workshop and/or conference discussion of student writing. Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 175 Architecture and Politics Prof. H. Harding
Civic buildings and capital cities tell much about the political ideas of the governments that construct them, revealing concepts of political identity, political values, political memory, and political power. This course will explore these aspects of public architecture at several levels—monuments, interior spaces, public buildings, public squares and plazas, and capital cities—drawing examples from a variety of political systems, both past and present. Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Human Sciences 701 Community and Identity Prof. T. Ramlow
Focuses on interrelated themes of community and identities as they have developed across disciplinary boundaries in the humanities and the social sciences. The course will draw directly on the rich resources provided by the Washington, DC, area. Students will undertake a semester-long research project concentrating on a specific DC or metropolitan area community. NOTE: WID Students must register for HMSC 701W.30, the WID discussion section.

Humanities 1 Roots of the Western Tradition Prof. L. Raphael
Basic ideas of Western thought from early Greek, Roman, Judaic, and Christian traditions. Representative readings in drama, epic, historical writings, oratory, creation stories, scriptural traditions, philosophy, and spiritual autobiography.

IAFF 94 Europe: International and Domestic Interactions Prof. M. Sodaro
A multidisciplinary view of contemporary Europe, including the EU states, other states of Eastern Europe, and Turkey. The widening processes of political, judicial, economic, cultural and security integration.

IAFF 190 Literature of Conflict Prof. D. Grier
This course looks at original canonical texts regarding the problems of international conflict over economic and territorial issues. Authors to be considered include Machiavelli, Elizabeth I, Burke, Pitt, Lincoln, Marx, Wilson, Gandhi, Keenan, and others.

Mathematics 191 Mathematics as a Language Prof. L. Abrams
This course provides students with the specialized language skills needed to work effectively with ideas of mathematics and communicate them to a variety of audiences. Writing with multiple review/revision cycles will play a prominent role; the course will involve creating original arguments and producing written records of arguments presented orally, as well as presenting oral explanations of written arguments. The focus will be on concepts, vocabulary, and syntactic constructions that are ubiquitous in mathematics.

Philosophy 51 Introduction to Philosophy Prof. T. Romanovskaya
Readings from major philosophers and study of their positions on the most basic questions of human life. Topics include such issues as: What is justice? What is knowledge? What is reality? Does God exist? What is the mind? Do humans have free will?

Philosophy 701 Advanced Critical Thinking and Writing Prof. M. Friend
This course is a follow-up to Philosophy 45 or Honors 25, Introduction to Logic, and develops the "critical thinking and reasoning" aspects of the earlier course. Student will be asked to develop their argument skills, particularly in writing and reading, and to explore the notion of argument and its place in society, its political, intellectual, and psychological effects. Ultimately the student will be asked to critique "critical reasoning" as it is standardly taught.

Physics 22 University Physics II Prof. B. Berman
Thermodynamics and classical electromagnetism using calculus. Equations of state, heat, and the laws of thermodynamics. Electrostatics, Gauss' law, capacitance. Electric resistance, electric current. Magnetism. Electrodynamics and electromagnetic induction. Maxwell's theory and electromagnetic radiation. Geometric and physical optics. Prerequisite: Phys 21 and Math 32. NOTE: WID Students must register for PHYS 22W.30, 31, or 32, the WID discussion sections.

Political Science 190 Chinese Politics and Foreign Relations Prof. D. Shambaugh

Political Science 190 Women and Politics in Comparative Perspective Prof. S. Wolchik
Focuses on women's roles in several areas including electoral politics, political leadership, non-governmental organizations, and international organizations, particularly those that deal with women's issues and empowerment. Materials will be drawn primarily from political science and international affairs, but also from women's studies and sociology to explore how women participate in politics, barriers to the participation of women in political leadership, and factors that facilitate participation by women.

Psychology 11 Abnormal Psychology Prof. D. Schell
Causes, diagnosis, treatment, and theories of various types of maladjustments and mental disorders.

Religion 185 Early Daoist Religion Prof. T. Michael
Early history of the formation and development of Daoism through a close reading of foundational texts such as the Daodejing and Zhuangzi.

Spanish 54 Tragedy and Comedy in the Hispanic World Prof. C. Britt
The historical, cultural, and political ties between Spain and Latin America and their representation in tragic and comic modes of imaginative literature as developed in Drama, poetry, and prose. Lecture, discussion, and writing assignments in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span. 30 or equivalent.

Speech and Hearing 71 Foundations of Human Communication Prof. N. Richards
An introduction to he fundamental principles of the biology of speech, hearing, and language, language structure and use, and human communicative interaction. Practice in the identification of specific verbal and nonverbal aspects of communication behavior.

Theatre and Dance 191 Dance History Prof. M. Buckley
Presents an overview of the development of Western theatrical dance, including major figures and movement theories, of the 19 th and 20 th centuries. Readings in dance history, discussions, lectures, and films/videotapes introduce selected choreographers and the concerns that inform their work. Additional reading in dance criticism, philosophy and aesthetics consider the broader question, "How does one read choreography?", and address ideas such as form, expression, technique, the body as an expressive instrument, audience expectations, and performance conventions.

Women's Studies 120 Introduction to Women's Studies Prof. B. Morris
This introductory women's studies course examines the power of women's voices through narrative writing and memoir, moving from the personal to the political. Students will read, write, and record women's memoirs.