WID Courses - Fall 2005

Last Updated: 12/26/05 | 1:30 pm

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Courses Titles

AH 109W.80, European Art of the Early Nineteenth Century, Robinson
16604 TR 2:20-3:35 Max 15 WID 

AH 177W.80, Modern Architecture, Jacks
16606 TR 11:10-2:25 Max 15 WID 

AMST 139W.80, Women in the United States , Murphy
15452 WF 9:35-10:25 Max 15 WID
Note: WID students must also register for AMST 139W.81, the WID discussion section.|
AMST 139W.81 Discussion
15453 F 11:10-12:00 

AMST 167W.10, Representing the American West, Knight
16883 TR 3:55-5:10pm WID 

AMST 168W.80, Cultural Criticism in America, Heap
16603 TR 2:20-3:35 Max 15 WID 
Note: Enrollment in this course is restricted to majors in American Studies.

ANTH 147W.80, Intro Hominid Evolution, Wood 
12363 TR 12:45-2:00 Max 30 WID 
Prerequisite: ANTH 1
Note: WID students must also register for one of the following labs: 
13822 T 2:20-3:35 Lab 
13823 T 3:45-5:00 Lab

ANTH 159W.80, Symbol, Cognition & Society, Allen
16478 TR 2:20-3:35 Max 20
Prerequisite: ANTH 2 or permission of instructor

ANTH 183W.80, Human Cultural Beginnings, Brooks
16608 F 8-9:15, M: 9:35-10:50 Max 20 
Prerequisite: ANTH 3

BISC 137W.80, Introductory Microbiology, Morris (4 credits)
15449 TR 11:10-12:25, 1:45-3:35 Max 10 WID 
Prerequisite: One year of chemistry
Laboratory fee: $55

BISC 123 Human Physiology Laboratory, Randall Packer (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BISC 122

BISC 171 Undergraduate Research, Randall Packer (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BISC 122

BISC 154W.80, General Ecology, Merchant
16609 MWF 11:10-12, F 12:45-3:45 Max 10 WID
Laboratory fee: $55
Note: Students must also register for a lab section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

COMM 110W.80, Research Methods in Communications, Selby
16610 TR 11:10-12, F 12:45-3:35 Max 20
Prerequisite: COMM 100

CSCI 183W.80, Computer Networks, Heller
12917 T 3:45-6:15 Max 30 WID
Prerequisite: CSCI 135,143

ECON 105W.80 Economic Conditions Analysis and Forecasting, Stekler
16266 WF 9:35-10:50 Max 20

ECON 161W.80, Public Finance I, Expenditure Analysis, Watson
16267 WF 9:35-10:50 Max 20 

ENGL 40W.80, Critical Readings (England Encounters the World), Salamon
16786 MF 11:10-12:25 Max 20

ENGL 40W.81, Critical Readings (Lit and Modernity), Soltan
16787 W 11:10-12:25, F 12:45-2:00 Max 20

ENGL 71W.80, Intro to American Literature, Sten 
16612 TR 3:55-5:10 Max 15 WID 

ENGL 71W.81, Intro to American Literature, Combs
16613 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15 WID 

ENGL 81W, Introduction to Creative Writing, McAleavey & Staff
15454 10   TR   11:10-12:25, Sachs 
15455 11   MW  9:35-10:50, Sachs 
15456 12   TR   8:00-9:15, MacKinnon 
15457 13   TR   8:00-9:15, Maliziewski 
15458 14   TR   9:35-10:50,MacKinnon
15459 15   TR   9:35-10:50, Greenwood-Stewa
15460 16   WF  9:35-10:50, Orange
15461 17   M    2:20-3:35, W 3:55-5:10, Willis 
15462 18   MW 12:45-2:00, Gutstein
15463 19   MF  3:55-5:10, Poliner 
15464 20   W   11:10-12:25, MF 12:45-2:00, Lowy
16788  21   MW  9:35-10:50, Payne 
16789  22   TR   3:55-5:10, Brandi 
16864  23   MW    12:45pm-02:00, Page 

15465 MV1 MW 10:00-11:15, Pollack 
15466 MV2 MW 1:00-2:15, Dharmaraj; Part of this section will be taught online using Blackboard

ENGL 103W, Intermediate Fiction
16614 10 MW 12:45-2:00, Max 15 WID, Moskowitz 
16615 11 M    2:20-3:35, W 3:55-5:10 , Max 15 WID, Gutstein
16616 12 WF  2:20-3:35, Max 15 WID, Poliner
16617 13 TR   3:55-5:10, Max 15 WID, Clair 
Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

ENGL 104W, Intermediate Poetry
16618 10 WF 2:20-3:35, Max 15 WID, Gutstein 
16619 12 MW 12:45-2:00, Max 15 WID, Pollack 
Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

ENGL 105W, Fundamentals of Dramatic Writing
16620 10 M 3:30-6:00, Griffith
16621 80 W 3:30-6:00, Griffith 
16865 81 M 3:30-6:00, TOMP 201, Stokes 
Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

ENGL 106W, Intermediate Fiction II
16622 10 TR 2:20-3:35, Max 15 WID, Clair
16623 11 M 2:20-3:35, W 3:55-5:10, Max 15 WID, Tabor 
Prerequisite: Engl 103 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

ENGL 107W.10, Intermediate Poetry II, Shore
16624 TR 2:40-3:35, Max 15 
Prerequisite: Engl 104 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

ENGL 120W.80, Critical Methods, Ramlow
16625 13 TR 9:35-10:50, Max 10 WID 

ENGL 133W.80, The Romantic Movement, Plotz
16626 M 2:20-3:35, W 3:55-5:10, Max 15 WID 

ENGL 162W.80, American Realism, Romines
16628 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15 WID 

ENGL 174W.80, African-American Literature, Miller
16629 TR 3:55-5:10 Max 15 WID 

ENGL 179W.80, Topics in Literary Theory, McRuer
16630 WF 9:35-10:50 Max 15 WID 

ENGL 181W.10, Poetry Workshop, Roeser
16631 TR 3:55-5:10 Max 15 WID

ENGL 182W.10, Special Topics in Creative Writing, Shore
16866 TR 12:45-2:00 Max 15 

EXSC 140W.80, Exercise and Sport Psychology, Sullivan
16632 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15 WID

EXSC 141W.80, Psychology of Injury and Performance, Washington-Lofgren
16634 MW 7:10-9:00 Max 10 WID

FA 110W.80, Textiles and Finish Materials, Sodaro-Spomer
16635 TR 9:00-10:30 Max 12 WID

FREN 30W.80, Intro to French Literature, Belenky
16636 MF 11:10-12:25 Max 20 WID
Prerequisite: FREN 10

FREN 108W.80, Advanced French Grammar & Style, Brant
16637 MWF 11:10-12:25 Max 20 WID 
Prerequisite: FREN 10

GEOG 140W.80, Urban Geography of the US, Benton-Short
15446 TR 2:20-3:35 Max 15 WID 

HIST 101W.80, Hasidism, Saperstein
16638 TR 12:45-2:00  Max 20 WID

HIST 153W.80, Tudor England, Peck
16639 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 10 WID

HONR 42W. M1, Sociocultural Anthropology, Shepherd
15522 T 3:30-6:00 Max 20 WID 
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped. 

HONR 45W.80, Honors Intro to Comparative Politics, O'Gara
15518 TR 2:20-3:35 Max 20 WID
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped. 

HONR 52W.80 Honors Creative Writing, Wallace
15519 MW 12:45-2:00 Max 15 WID 
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped. 

HONR 175.81, Buddhist/Daoist Literature, Michaels
15520 T 7:10-9:40 Max 20 WID 
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped. 

HONR 175.82, The Quality of Democracy in International Comparison, Campbell
15521 TR 3:55-5:10 Max 20 WID 
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped. 

HONR 175W.83, Birth & Death of Mountain Ranges, Stephens
16094 MW 11:30-12:45 Max 20 WID 
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped. 

HONR 175W.M1, Jane Austen, M. Frawley 
16092 TR 10:00-11:15 Max 20 WID 
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped. 

HONR 175.MV  Culture and Human Rights, Shepherd
14378 T 3:30-6:00
Prerequisite: ANTH 2 (suggested)
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

IAFF 190W.80, Contemporary Italy, Iovino
15533 W 11:10-12:25 Max 20 WID

IAFF 190W.81, Contemporary Conflict, Kostantaras
15534 R 11:10-1:00 Max 20 WID

IAFF 190W.82, European Democracy and EU: A Global Comparison, Campbell
15535 WF 2:20-3:35 Max 20 WID

JAPN 121W.80, Advanced Conversation and Composition, Sato and Hamano
16863 TR 8:00-9:15 Max 5 WID
Prerequisite: JAPN 106 or equivalent.

JOUR 111W, Reporting and Writing the News
16640 80 TR 8:00-9:15 Max 18, Lipman
16641 81 MW 8:00-9:15 Max 18, Marsh
16642 82 MW 11:10-12:25 Max 18, Whitman
16643 83 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 18, Zuckerman
16644 84 TR 3:55-5:10 Max 18, Belkind

JOUR 112W.80, Advanced Reporting, May
16645 MW 12:45-2:00 Max 15 WID
Prerequisite: Jour 111. Restricted to journalism majors or permission of instructor required.

LATN 103W.80, Major Latin Authors [Tacitus], Fisher
16646 MW 12:45-2:00 Max 14 WID 
Prerequisite: Latn 3, 4; or permission of instructor.

MATH 103W.80 Computability Theory, Harizanov
16647 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 10 WID

MUS 127W.80, Music History II: Tonal Era, Youens
16648 TR 9:35-10:50 Max 15 WID

PHIL 125W.80, Philosophy of Race and Gender, Weiss
16649 MW 12:45-2:00 Max 15 WID

PHIL 142W.80, Philosophy of Law, Brand-Ballard
16650 TR 12:45-2:00 Max 15 WID

PHYS 0074W.80, Music and Physics, Berman
13750 TR 12:45-2:00 Max 54 WID
Laboratory Fee: $55
Note: Students must also register for a lab section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

PSC 142W.80 International Organization, Finnemore
16651 TR 9:35-10:50 , Max 10 WID 
Note: Requires department approval for WID registration. See Political Science Department before attempting to register.
Note: Students must also register for a discussion section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

PSYC 011W.MV Abnormal Psychology, Schell
16083 MW 1:00-2:15 Max 20 WID

PSYC 106W.80, Principles and Methods of Psychology, O'Leary (4 credits) 
16652 MW 9:35-10:50, F 8:35-10:50 Max 15 WID 
Note: Students must also register for a lab section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

PSYC 106W.81, Principles and Methods of Psychology, Philbeck (4 credits) 
13732 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15 WID 
Note: Students must also register for a lab section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

PUBH 191W.80, Intro to Health Policy, Wilensky
16653 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15 

REL 103W.80, Biblical Issues: Wisdom Literature, Ticktin
16654 TR 12:25-2:00 Max 10 

REL 190W.80, Women and Islam, Pemberton
16655 TR 11:10-12:25 Max WID 15

SOC 103W.80, Classical Sociological Theory, Kennelly
15444 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 15 WID

SOC 170W.80, Sociology of Class and Inequality, Marshall
16656 TR 11:10-12:25 Max 30 WID

SOC 189W.10, Sociology of Punishment and Corrections, Buntman
16458 MW 12:45-2:00 Max 30 WID

SPHR 71W.82 Foundations of Human Communication, Richards
14721 MWF 11:10-12 Max 15 WID

SPHR 104W.80 Speech and Language Disorders, Williamson
16828 TR 3:55-5:10 Max 15 WID 

STAT 183W.80, Intermediate Statistical Lab: Stat Computing Packages, Ghosh
16657 MW 11:10-12:00, 12:45-1:35 Max 12 WID
Prerequisite: an introductory statistics course.

TRDA 195W.80, Theatre Criticism, Marks
15490 W 3:45-6:16 Max 10 WID

 

Courses Descriptions

Art History 109, European Art of the Early Nineteenth Century, Prof. Lilien F. Robinson
This course considers the development of Neoclassicism and Romanticism in the context of the intellectual, political, and social climate of Europe from the eve of the French Revolution to the defeat of Napoleon and the restoration of the French monarchy. While the primary focus is on France , the discussion of German and English Romanticism is a significant component of the course. Major artists and their work are discussed in reference to style; philosophical, literary and social context; nineteenth-century criticism; and contemporary culture.

Art History 177, Modern Architecture, Prof. Philip Jacks
Major developments in architecture and urbanism from the Industrial Revolution to the end of the 20th century.

American Studies 139.80, Women in the United States , Prof. Teresa Murphy
This course will examine the history of women in the United States from pre-Columbian settlement until Reconstruction. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which gender has been an important component in the construction of power relationships; the ways in which issues of race and class have affected the relationships among women; and the ways in which ideas about gender have evolved during the past several centuries. NOTE: WID Students must register for AMST 139W.81 or 139W.82, the WID discussion sections.

167W.10, Representing the American West, Prof. Melinda Knight
This course will consider the American West as an idea, place, and process. We will focus primarily on the period from 1880 to 1930 and study cultural documents such as exploration and settlement narratives, autobiography, fiction, historiography, painting, photography, and film. We will examine the iconography of the wilderness; western migration and pioneer images; the “closing” of the frontier; issues of race, class and gender in relation to nationalism and nativism; the myth of the “Vanishing American”' the western as genre; and the legacy of conquest.

American Studies 168.10, Cultural Criticism in America, Prof. Chad Heap
The course will cover a variety of approaches to cultural criticism, encompassing the nature of aesthetic accomplishment as well as the social contexts that alter and enrich the shape of cultural expression. In addition, we will look at the significance of culture to politics, social life, and the development of individual and collective identities. Note: Enrollment in this course is restricted to majors in American Studies.

Anthropology 147, Introduction to Hominid Evolution, Prof. Bernard Wood
The fossil record of hominid evolution considered in the light of evolutionary theory. Brief review of the earlier human antecedents, with concentration on the Pleistocene remains. Laboratory fee, $40. Prerequisite: Anth 1.

Anthropology 159, Symbolic Anthropology, Prof. Catherine J. Allen
The study of culture through the analysis of symbolic systems including myth, cosmology, art, ritual, political symbolism, and kinship. Prerequisite: Anth 2 or permission of instructor.

Anthropology 183, Human Cultural Beginnings, Prof. Alison S. Brooks
This course will present an overview of Paleolithic Archaeology, the study of the earliest human remains, from the appearance of the first artifacts over 2.5 million years ago until the end of the Pleistocene 10,000 years ago. We will deal with issues of origins and identity that have captivated humanity for millennia, and continue to shape our world today. In this class, we will take a detailed look at the material evidence of human cultural origins, focusing on the major questions that confront archaeologists and the scientific methods used to answer them. Prerequisite: Anth 3.

Biological Sciences 137, Introductory Microbiology, Prof. David W. Morris
A broad survey of micro-organisms and viruses is presented and their importance to the environment, human health, and scientific research emphasized. Attention will also be focused upon important contemporary aspects of microbiology such as antibiotic resistance, emergence of new diseases, and biological warfare. Some laboratories and most writing assignments will reflect these aspects. Prerequisite: one year of chemistry. Laboratory fee, $55.  Note: Students must also register for a lab section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

Biological Sciences 154, General Ecology, Prof. Henry Merchant
Lecture (3 hours), laboratory and field (3 hours). Introduction to the concepts of limiting factors, biogeochemical cycles, trophic levels, and energy transfer and their relationship to the structure and function of population, species, communities, and ecosystems. Laboratory fee, $55. Note: Students must also register for a lab section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

Chinese 121, Advanced Conversation and Composition, Prof. Phyllis Zhang
Developing productive skills in Chinese at the extended discourse level; topic-specific practice on commonly used speech patterns and writing formats. Prerequisite: CHIN 106 or professor permission. 

Communications 110, Research Methods in Communications, Prof. Gary Selby
Processes of inquiry within interpersonal and public communication. Students are introduced to concepts of framing research questions, conducting literature reviews, developing a research design, using qualitative and quantitative research tools, and interpreting results of research in communication. Prerequisite: Comm 100

Computer Science 183, Computer Networks, Prof. Rachelle Heller
Higher-layer protocols and network applications on the Internet, such as session layer, presentation layer, data-encryption, directory services and reliable transfer services, telnet, network management, network measurements, e-mail systems, and error reporting. Prerequisite: CSCI 135,143

Economics 105, Economic Conditions Analysis and Forecasting, Prof. Herman Stekler
This course presents both the theory and empirical evidence related to economic trends and fluctuations. It surveys the existing methods of forecasting economic activity and explores some of these techniques in depth.

Economics 161 Public Finance I, Expenditure Analysis, Prof. Harry Watson
This course covers the analysis of expenditure and regulatory programs, such as Medicare and the EPA, with an emphasis on policy design and efficiency. It begins with a discussion of the rationales for such programs, which are primarily market failures, followed by a treatment of policy design issues, and ends with an application of this material to specific programs.

English 40.80, Critical Readings in English: England Encounters the World, Prof. Lee Salamon
The English inhabit part of a modest-sized island off the coast of Europe that, until the later 16 th century, was obscure and backward. But across 300 yesars they were able to develop two empires that changed the character of geography, government, commerce, and culture itself around the globe. In the 20 th century, the second Empire fought back, and the contours of English society changed. In this course, we will explore major texts and films that interrogate England ’s encounters with other worlds and their consequences.

English 40.81, Critical Readings in English: Literature and Modernity, Prof. Margaret Soltan
What does it mean to be modern? Some would argue that it means, among other things, not reading literature—or anything much else—but being “post-literate,” or “a-literate.” This section will consider the ways in which great poetry, fiction, and drama of the twentieth century marks and interprets the various challenges of modernity.

English 71, Introduction to American Literature, Prof. Christopher Sten, Prof. Robert Combs
Historical survey from early American writing through Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.

English 81 Introduction to Creative Writing, Staff
An exploration of genres of creative writing (fiction, poetry, and/or playwriting). Basic problems and techniques; examples of modern approaches; weekly writing assignments; workshop and/or conference discussion of student writing.

English 103 Intermediate Fiction I, Staff
The writing of fiction. This course involves reading literary models, written and oral peer critiquing, and the writing of two revised, finished short stories. Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 104 Intermediate Poetry I, Staff
The writing of poetry. Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 105 Fundamentals of Dramatic Writing, Professor Patricia Griffith
A workshop in playwriting and screenwriting, with emphasis on dramatic structure. Prerequisite: Engl 81 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 106 Intermediate Fiction II, Prof. Maxine Clair, Prof. Jane Shore
The writing of fiction. Prerequisite: Engl 103 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 107 Intermediate Poetry II, Prof. Jane Shore
The writing of poetry. Prerequisite: Engl 104 or equivalent and two semesters of literature courses.

English 120, Critical Methods, Staff
The topics and techniques of literary analysis, applied to English and American poetry, prose fiction, and drama. Attention to stylistic and structural analysis, narratology, and critical theory applied to specific literary texts.

English 133, The Romantic Movement, Prof. Judith Plotz
How to Read a Romantic Poem; or Six Texts in Search of their Readers. This course will concentrate on a small number of brilliant romantic-era texts (Keats's Odes, selected nature lyrics by Wordsworth and Clare, Coleridge's "Kubla Khan," "Christabel," and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner", selected apocalyptic lyrics and prophecies by Blake, and Byron's Don Juan). Our aim is to interrogate four characteristic romantic modes of transcendence (via art, nature, myth, and irony) and to exercise multiple reading strategies appropriate to these elliptical and influential works. Our approaches will include attention to intertextualities (e.g. Keats, Shakespeare, Stevens; and also Blake, Milton, Ginsburg); to formal poetics (e.g. Bryon's epic ottava rime); to interdisciplinary and cross-media intersections (e.g. Wordsworth and British landscape painting; Clare and Enlightenment natural history); to romantically-generated vs. post-structural framings (e.g. Coleridge's critical self-representation vs. McGann's Romantic Ideology); and to biographical-historical reading (e.g. the case of John Clare). REQUIREMENTS: bi-weekly exercises; a small-group class presentation; and two papers. There will be a final but no mid-term.

English 162, American Realism, Prof. Ann Romines
The shaping of America's literary and cultural traditions as shown by significant writers of the Realist school: Twain, James, Crane, Howells, Wharton, Chopin, Robinson, and others.

English 174, African-American Literature, Prof. James Miller
After a consideration of a range of antebellum slave narratives this course will turn its attention to the ways in which contemporary American writers have appropriated the themes and conventions of the slave narrative to satisfy various literary, cultural and political purposes. Writers to be studied include William Styron, Shirley Anne Williams, David Bradley, Octavia Butler, and Toni Morrison. There will also be readings in the historiography of slavery, literary theory, and cultural history.

English 179, Topics in Literary Theory, Prof. Robert McRuer
Selected topics in the diverse theoretical methodologies and interdisciplinary studies that characterize contemporary English and American literary studies. May be repeated for credit provided that topic differs.

English 181, Poetry Workshop
Taught by the Jenny McKean Moore Writer in Washington; open to undergraduates and graduate students. Prerequisite: a 100-level creative writing course. May be repeated for credit, if taught by a different instructor.

English 182, Special Topics in Creative Writing, Prof. Jane Shore
Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes; may be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Topics of projected courses include poetry and poetics; forms and methods in fiction; forms ad methods in poetry; memoir and personal narratives; creative nonfiction; "literature, live!"; avant-garde and experimental writing. Limited to 15 students.

Exercise Science 140, Exercise and Sport Psychology, Prof. Patricia Sullivan
This course is designed to introduce students to current research and theoretical perspectives related to psychological and psychosocial components of exercise and sport participation. Personality, motivation, social facilitation, anxiety, aggression, and other factors that influence individuals and teams/groups are examined. Prerequisite: Psyc 1.

Exercise Science 141, Psychology of Injury and Performance, Prof. Leah Washington-Lofgren
A study of various areas within the behavioral sciences related to the rehabilitation and prevention of injuries and the injured physically active individual.

Fine Arts 110 Textiles and Finish Materials, Prof. Christine Spangler
This course familiarizes the student with the appearance, applications, and installation techniques of major finish and surfacing materials used in interior design. The course also engages the student to learn the characteristics of different types of fibers, yarns, fabrics, construction printing, and finishing techniques in the textile industry. Students will gain experience in choosing fabrics and finishes for use in specific interior environments, and will become acquainted with the professional practices, safety standards, and testing procedures used in the interior design industry.

French 30, Introduction to French Literature, Prof. Masha Belenky
This course is an introduction to French literature. We will read closely a broad selection of texts from different genres (poetry, prose, theater) and periods, and learn how to read and write analytically about literature in its cultural context using different techniques of textual analysis. We will explore the complex relationship that exists among a reader, a text, and an author. The unifying theme of this class is representation of spaces (physical, metaphoric, imaginary, poetic, psychological, ideological etc). We will examine how landscapes, cityscapes, houses, prisons, and open spaces do not merely serve as a background, but rather have a profound meaning indispensable to the development of the story or the structure of a poem, and to our understanding of the texts. (Course is conducted in French). Prerequisite: FREN 10.

French 108, Advanced French Grammar and Style, Prof. Jocelyne Brant
Composition, drills, dictations. Translations into French. Study of vocabulary and syntax, with emphasis on stylistic devices. Prerequisite: FREN 10.

Geography 140, Urban Geography of the US, Prof. Lisa Benton-Short
Analysis of the economic, political, and social challenges confronting US cities with an emphasis on patterns and dynamics of location within the city.

History 101.80, Hasidism, Prof. Marc Saperstein
A study of the history, literature, thought and spirituality of Hasidism—one of the most successful movements in modern Jewish history—from its origins in the 18 th century to the present. The relationship between Hasidism and other movements in modern Jewish history (Talmudism, Haskalah, Zionism, messianism) will be explored. Emphasis will be on analyzing primary sources, issues in the historical study of Hasidism, and presentations of Hasidism in literature.

History 153, Tudor England, Prof. Linda Levy Peck
Aspects of the constitutional, social, intellectual, economic, and religious development of England, 1485-1603.

Honors 42, Sociocultural Anthropology, Prof. Robert Shepherd
This course introduces students to the language, theory, methods, and tools of anthropology. It aims to help students thing about and understand the cultural similarities and differences among, between, and within cultural groups, the role culture plays in shaping individuals, what anthropologists mean when they speak about “culture,” how this relates to notions of “nature,” and how these concepts shape views on race, sexuality, family, and work. Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 45, Honors Introduction to Comparative Politics, Prof. Matthew O’Gara
This course is an introduction to the field of comparative politics, which focuses primarily on the concept of political development within states and across regions. We will compare states, nations and various sub-state actors (such as multinational corporations and terrorist movements) while continually progressing toward a sophisticated understanding of the nature, processes and effects of globalization. Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 52, Honors Creative Writing
An exploration of genres of creative writing (fiction, poetry, and/or playwriting). Basic problems and techniques; examples of modern approaches; weekly writing assignments; workshop and/or conference discussion of student writing.
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 175.81, Buddhist/Daoist Literature, Professor Thomas Michael
Commonly recognized as originating with the short text called the Daodejing attributed to the mysterious figure known as Laozi, Daoism grew to become the major indigenous vehicle for religious expression in traditional China. In this course, we will explore the early history of the formation and development of Daoism up to the fourth century A.D. through close readings of important foundational texts. We will examine the earliest religious views as represented in such writings as the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, two texts long recognized as important classics of world literature, and move on to the less familiar study of later Daoism as it was transformed into a major religious institution that played a dominant role in Chinese culture. Through a close reading of texts taken from or associated with the Daoist Canon, we will look at the divinization of Laozi, some particularly Daoist forms of messianism and apocalyptism, the emergence of communal forms of Daoist worship and organization, as well as specifically Daoist methods of salvational practice.
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 175.82, Quality of Democracy in International Comparison, Prof. David. F.J. Campbell
With the global, quantitative spreading of democracy, issues of “quality of democracy” crucially gained in importance during recent years. What is democracy? Partially, this can be answered by focusing more specifically on: What is the quality of democracy? For the continued success of democracy it is important that democracies can maintain and even increase their quality, accompanied by an understanding of these mechanisms. Therefore, the course will concentrate on conceptualizing, defining, and measuring democracy and the quality of democracy in international comparison. Already, several comparative projects exist and operate, conducting democracy measurement and encouraging democracy improvement. In the course we will review these different democracy-measurement projects, and discuss similarities and/or difference. Crucial also will be the test, how the evolution of democracy refers to developments in other areas, e.g. the evolution of economics and knowledge. Furthermore, democracy consequently transcends the border limitations of the nation state. For example, what are implications for “supranational democracy” (and legitimacy) in the context of the European Union integration? In addition, can some form of democracy or a “global democracy” also be applied to international affairs in the new global world system? The course will focus on “advanced democracies and the global/transnational integration challenges, but will also cover the newly industrializing countries. Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 175.83, Birth & Death of Mountain Ranges, Prof. Stephens
The mountain ranges of North America, and elsewhere, have played a pivotal role in human history. They have served as physical barriers to migration and settlement and provide both biological and geological resources for humankind. Through a series of readings and discussions, this course will contrast the geologic history of the Appalachian Mountains with that of the Rockies. We will also explore the concept of plate tectonics as it relates to mountain evolution, largely through three required one-day, weekend field trips. Readings from John McPhee and geological texts and journals provide the relevant background information.
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

Honors 175, Jane Austen, Prof. Maria Frawley
This course will survey the novels of Jane Austen, focusing in particular on the complicated ways that her fiction reflects and responds to literary, social, and political cultures of late-eighteenth and early nineteenth-century England. Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

HONR 175.MV  Culture and Human Rights, Prof. Robert Shepherd
This course examines competing notions of human rights, beginning with the relationship between principles of international law, property-based rights of personal liberty, and more ambiguous and highly contested rights grounded in shared values and, broadly speaking, "culture." Prerequisite: ANTH 2 (suggested)
Note: This course is for Honors students only. All non-Honors students who register for the course will be dropped.

International Affairs 190.80, Contemporary Italy, Prof. Angela Iovino
Controversies still abound among Italians concerning Italy’s Fascist and post-Fascist historical past. Some claim if you were not an active partisan, you were by default promoting Fascism and therefore responsible for Italy’s economic and social crises. Many Italian intellectuals (right, center and left) portray the Germans as exemplifying the negative-side of Fascism exonerating themselves. Unlike France and Germany, Italy is not ready yet to come to terms with its historical past. Italian literature and film echo this discomfort in national history. Recently, scholars of both history and culture have pointed out that a not so evident, though substantial, continuity remained between the culture, institutions, men and political hierarchies of the Ventennio (Mussolini’s 20 year rule) and the ones of the newly born Republic. This course reviews Italian history from post-WW II to present day and juxtaposes historical fact with cultural expressions in literature and film. Students will write extensively on the topic.

International Affairs 190.81, Contemporary Conflict, Prof. Dean Kostantaras
This course surveys the history of modern conflict in Europe in order to consider how problems of contemporary statecraft compare with those of the past. In addition to offering insights into how scholars use the past to gain a clearer or broader view of the present, readings have been selected for their value as exercises in the study of international affairs.

International Affairs 190.82, European Democracy and EU: A Global Comparison, Prof. David. F.J. Campbell
The course will focus on democracy in Europe, placing an emphasis on Western Europe and the EU member countries. Three major areas of interest are: (1) Measuring democracy: Concepts and indicators will be presented, which should allow for a systematic comparative analysis of democracy and a testing of different theories. (2) Quality of democracy: What are available concepts for evaluating the quality of democracy? (3) European (supranational) democracy in a global perspective: What are the implications for nation state-based democracy in Europe, embedded in the supranational architecture of the EU; furthermore, when European democracy is compared with other advanced democracies, what are similar and/or different characteristics (does something like a “Global Democracy” emerge?). Within that general framework, the course will focus more specifically on additional topics: classical texts about democracy; the dynamics of party systems and political systems in Western Europe, and the particular challenge of the rise of populist and extreme right-wing parties in Europe during the 1990s; collapse and/or survival of democracy in inter-war Europe, and the spreading of democracy in Central and Eastern Central Europe after 1989, following the breakdown of communism.

Japanese 121 Advanced Conversation and Composition, Prof. Shoko Hamano
This course explores the interconnections between food, family, and environment. Lecture, discussion, and writing assignments in Japanese. Prerequisite: JAPN 106 or equivalent.

Journalism 111, Reporting and Writing the News, Staff
Fundamentals of news reporting and writing, with emphasis on the print media. News judgment, information gathering skills, and facility in crafting news and feature stories. Regular in-class and outside reporting and writing exercises to learn journalistic style. Directly admitted freshmen are eligible; all other freshmen need departmental permission to enroll. Laboratory fee, $100.

Journalism 112, Advanced Reporting, Prof. Albert May
Reporting, writing, and computer skills for covering new beats and developing in-depth news stories. Techniques in researching, observing, and interviewing to frame stories of public interest will be learned through outside and in-class reporting and writing assignments. Prerequisite: Jour 111. Restricted to journalism majors or permission of instructor required.

Latin 103, Major Latin Authors : Tacitus, Prof. Elizabeth Fisher
Students will read Book I of Tacitus’ Histories in Latin. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Latn 3, 4; or permission of instructor.

Math 103 Computability Theory, Prof. Valentina Harizanov
This course will cover the unlimited register machine as a model of an idealized computer, computable function, Church’s thesis, effective enumerability, the unsolvability of the halting problem and other theoretical limitations of what computers can do.

Music 127, Music History II: The Tonal Era, Prof. Laura Youens
The course will cover music from Monteverdi’s death (1643) through Mahler. Styles, structures, social foundations and aesthetic change in European music of the late 17th through the late 19th centuries.

Philosophy 125, Philosophy of Race and Gender, Prof. Gail Weiss
A theoretical examination of the bodily, social, discursive, and political effects of patriarchy, racism, and classism.

Philosophy 142, Philosophy of Law, Prof. Jeffrey Brand-Ballard
Systematic examination of fundamental concepts of law and jurisprudence; special emphasis on the relationship between law and morality.

Physics 007, Music and Physics, Prof. Barry Berman
Primarily for non-science majors.  A comparative study of music and physics, showing parallels in the history of the two fields and emphasizing those topics in physics related to the theory of music and the production of sound by musical instruments, particularly classical mechanics and wave motion.  Prerequisite: high school algebra and geometry.  Laboratory fee, $55. Note: Students must also register for a lab section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

Political Science 142, International Organization, Prof. Martha Finnemore
Development and operations of the United Nations, regional organizations, and functional international organizations.
Note: Requires department approval for WID registration. See Political Science Department before attempting to register.
Note: Students must also register for a discussion section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

Psychology 011 Abnormal Psychology, Prof. Dennis E. Schell
This course covers the causes, diagnoses, treatment, and theories of various types of maladjustments and mental disorders.

Psychology 106 Principles and Methods of Psychology, Prof. John Philbeck, Prof. O’Leary
An experimental approach to understanding behavior; individual and class experiments performed.
Note: Students must also register for a lab section. See the full schedule of classes for times and section numbers.

Public Health 191, Introduction to Health Policy, Prof. Sara Wilensky
This course has two main goals. First, as a survey course of health policy, students will be able to understand the fundamental problems and contemporary issues in health policy in the United States. The course enables students to think systematically about these problems and the various strategies available to public and private policymakers when addressing these matters. Second, as a policy analysis course, students will apply new analytic writing skills to policy problems in the U.S. health system. The course explains the steps of a policy analysis that may be applied to any area and uses these tools to evaluate issues in health care.

Religion 103, Biblical Wisdom Literature, Prof. Max Ticktin
Biblical Issues: Critical examination of a selected biblical topic or text.

Religion 190, Women and Islam, Prof. Kelly Pemberton
Selected Topics in Religion: Critical examination of religious phenomena rendered timely by current events or special resources.

Sociology 103 Classical Sociological Theory, Prof. Ivy Kennelly
Sociological theory is a tool that enables us to interpret, analyze, and explain the world around us. Adopting a theoretical approach in social analysis—especially one that is critical and challenges long-held assumptions about the social world—is an important element in developing an informed understanding of society. In this course we will collaboratively examine theories from the “classical period” of modernity (1848-1919) by Harriet Martineau, Karl Marx, Anna Julia Cooper, Emile Durkheim, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W.E.B. DuBois, and Max Weber. These theories will help us answer questions like: Why do we often say one thing but do another? Why do I hate my job? Why do I get along with somebody who is so different from me? Why do we feel lazy if we don’t work long hours? and How can we envision the future? Studying and applying classical sociological theories will equip students to better understand the nature of social relations now, historically, and even in the future.

Sociology 170 Sociology of Class and Inequality, Prof. Robert Penney
We live in a society where people have access to unequal amounts of resources and opportunities. These inequalities over time become institutionalized into economic, political, and cultural patterns that affect individuals’ life chances. This course will explore the dimensions and dynamics of social stratification within American society. What is social class and how does it form? Is inequality necessary or beneficial to society? How is stratification shaped by race and gender? These are some of the questions we will be discussing in this course.

Sociology 189 Sociology of Punishment and Corrections, Prof. Fran Buntman
”Corrections and Punishment” examines the sociology of how and why society responds to criminal suspects and offenders through incapacitation, punishment, and /or reform. Specific topics the course covers include the institutional organization of corrections and punishment (e.g. community corrections, jails, prisons), the interaction between law and corrections (e.g. torture, prisoner rights), and questions of power and social control in shaping punishment and corrections (e.g. domination and resistance, corrections as governance, power relations within correctional settings).

Speech and Hearing 71, Foundations of Human Communication, Prof. Nelda Richards
An introduction to he fundamental principles of the biology of speech, hearing, and language, language structure and use, and human communicative interaction. Practice in the identification of specific verbal and nonverbal aspects of communication behavior.

Speech and Hearing 104, Speech and Language Disorders, Prof. Darlene Williamson
Survey of the nature and causes of developmental and acquired disorders of speech and language. Emphasis on prevention and effective communication with persons having a speech-language impairment.

Statistics 183, Intermediate Statistical Laboratory: Statistical Computing Packages, Prof. Kaushik Ghosh
Application of program packages (e.g., SAS, SPSS) to the solution of one-, two- and k-sample parametric and nonparametric statistical problems. Basic concepts in data preparation, modification, analysis and interpretation of results. Students learn how to analyze data using statistical packages and write reports. Prerequisite: an introductory statistics course.

Theatre and Dance 195, Theatre Criticism, Prof. Peter Marks
Topics of current interest in theatre or dance.