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UHP LogoGeorge Washington University
University Honors Program
714 21st Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: (202) 994-6816
Fax: (202) 994-0842
uhp@gwu.edu
About the Site

Course Offerings

Spring 2011

Course information is subject to change without notice, check back frequently to stay up to date. Every effort is taken to ensure the below information is accurate and up to date. You should confirm any course selections with the GWU online schedule of classes.

Origins of Modern Thought

The spring semester of "Origins and Evolution of Modern Thought, Western and Eastern Traditions" builds on the encounter with foundational ancient thinkers and texts provided in the autumn "Origins" course, engaging students in the exploration of key developments and trajectories in human thought and inquiry to modern times. Spring semester readings and discussions are organized with reference to key themes, ideas and innovations characterizing these developments in a global context.

Themes guiding spring semester readings and discussions:
Individualism, Pluralism, Secularism, Natural science, Rationalism in social/political thought

Who Should Take These: Freshmen take one Origins and Evolution of Modern Thought course Spring semester.

Sapere Aude! Dare to know!
Professor Eyal Aviv
HONR 1016:10 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:10
CRN: 11793
MW 2:20-3:35

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:30 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15335
F 9:35-10:25

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

The transition from antiquity to the modern period was not a smooth one. In the second part of the course we will shift our attention from the "origins" to the "evolution" of modern thought. Through a selection of prominent thinkers and writers we will explore the make-up of what we call modernity and its pendulum swings between great optimism and harsh critique. We will read writings of theologians, philosophers and writers who followed the command of Immanuel Kant: Sapere Aude! Dare to know, and will ask what happened to individuals and society on the path to "modernity." While the rise of modernity was primarily a Western phenomenon, we will also read selective readings of non-Western writers and discuss their response to modernity. A special attention will be given to the decline of "tradition" (whether political or religious), and how this decline led to novel theories of justice. We will ask ourselves questions such as what is the right thing to do? Who has the right to determine right or wrong? Throughout the class we will continue raising critical questions, discuss and debate them in class and further develop the academic skills that we began exploring in the first semester.




Ideals of Modernity
Professor Biagio Tassone
HONR 1016:11 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:11
CRN: 11049
MW 2:20-3:35

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:31 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15336
F 3:55-4:45

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

"What a piece of work is man" these words, penned by the English writer William Shakespeare in the 17th century, still speak to us today. The modern age was a time when human beings undertook new endeavors and the focus of their attention shifted from the outer to the inner and from eternity to the here and now. Life changed from being grounded on the static traditional ideas and customs into the search for progress guided by the ideals of reason, science, and individual liberty. In modernity the emergence of the secular state and the attainment of a plurality of goods is witnessed. But what we now call 'modernity' was actually the product of an astonishing series of intellectual revolutions. Building on the accomplishments of antiquity, much of modern thought decisively departs from ancient teachings and practice. In this seminar we will examine the fundamental ideals of modernity and their origins. We will begin with a consideration of the Christian roots of modernity, in which the seeds of modern individualism are planted. Next we turn to the scientific revolution, which empowers humanity, making us masters of nature. The scientific revolution indirectly lays the groundwork for new theories in politics which place popular sovereignty and individual liberty at the center of political life. Modernity also gave birth to its own critics, and in the final readings for the course we will consider thinkers who attempt to clarify the contradictions and costs of modern rationalism. Themes explored in this section will include: individualism, pluralism, secularism, the rise of natural science, and the influence of rationalism in both theoretical and social/political thought.




Foundations of Modernity
Professor Robert Shepherd
HONR 1016:12 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:12
CRN: 12572
TR 11:10-12:25

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:32 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15337
F 2:20-3:10

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

In this course we continue our exploration of questions about the human condition that transcend cultural, linguistic, and historical boundaries, focusing on the notion of modernity. What does it mean to be "modern"? What defines modernity? What are the consequences, whether positive or negative, conscious or unintended, of modernity's embrace of reason and science and rejection of tradition and religious faith? How does the modern turn towards secularism, science, and rationality affect our understanding of the good life? How does this affect our understanding of politics and art? What role does the concept of individual happiness play in modernity? What, in the modern world, defines the good life? These are complex questions that have been addressed in different ways over the course of the last three centuries. In this course we will begin with a close examination of the production of modernity, primarily in Western Europe and North America. In the second section of this course we will turn to the reception of modernity in those areas of the world which, paradoxically, are usually defined as modernity's other - the 'East', the 'traditional', the colonized subjects of Western imperial powers.




The Individual
Professor Ronald W. Dworkin
HONR 1016:13 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:13
CRN: 14717
W 5:10-7:00

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:33 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15338
W 3:55-4:45

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

This course traces the development of the "individual" from antiquity to the present day. Students will learn about the "individual" in the same way that the world did: first as a revolutionary concept in philosophy; then as a political and economic reality in the U.S. and Europe. The reaction against the "individual" will then be studied-again, first in philosophy, then in the form of twentieth century mass political movements such as fascism and communism. Thus, the course is not a pure philosophy course, but, instead, is designed to show how ideas have consequences for everyday life. Saint Augustine, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Nietzsche, Marx, and Tocqueville are among the writers to be studied. The various facets of the "individual" will also be examined-for example, the difference between individualism and individuality, and how the concept of the individual stands in relation to other concepts in modernity, such as democracy, equality, and liberty.




Ideals of Modernity
Professor Biagio Tassone
HONR 1016:14 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:14
CRN: 14718
W 5:10-7:00

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:34 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15339
R 3:55-4:45

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

"What a piece of work is man" these words, penned by the English writer William Shakespeare in the 17th century, still speak to us today. The modern age was a time when human beings undertook new endeavors and the focus of their attention shifted from the outer to the inner and from eternity to the here and now. Life changed from being grounded on the static traditional ideas and customs into the search for progress guided by the ideals of reason, science, and individual liberty. In modernity the emergence of the secular state and the attainment of a plurality of goods is witnessed. But what we now call 'modernity' was actually the product of an astonishing series of intellectual revolutions. Building on the accomplishments of antiquity, much of modern thought decisively departs from ancient teachings and practice. In this seminar we will examine the fundamental ideals of modernity and their origins. We will begin with a consideration of the Christian roots of modernity, in which the seeds of modern individualism are planted. Next we turn to the scientific revolution, which empowers humanity, making us masters of nature. The scientific revolution indirectly lays the groundwork for new theories in politics which place popular sovereignty and individual liberty at the center of political life. Modernity also gave birth to its own critics, and in the final readings for the course we will consider thinkers who attempt to clarify the contradictions and costs of modern rationalism. Themes explored in this section will include: individualism, pluralism, secularism, the rise of natural science, and the influence of rationalism in both theoretical and social/political thought.




Modernity and its Critics
Professor William Winstead
HONR 1016:15 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:15
CRN: 14947
MW 6:00-7:15

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:35 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15340
F 2:20-3:10

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

Our Origins proseminar this semester will examine the fundamental ideals of the modern age: Science, rationality, freedom, the secular state, and a plurality of individual goods. We will begin our readings with a consideration of the Christian roots of modernity, which lay the seeds for modern individualism with its emphasis on inner, spiritual freedom. Next we will turn to the scientific revolution, which empowered humanity, making it master of the earth. The scientific revolution in turn laid the groundwork for new theories of politics, which placed popular sovereignty and individual liberty at the center of political life. Modernity also gave birth to its own critics, and, in the final readings of the course, we will consider thinkers who attempt to clarify the contradictions and costs of modern rationalism and the high value it places on science, technology, and unfettered economic growth. Readings will include the Christian Bible, St. Augustine, The Qu'ran, Descartes, Newton, Machiavelli, Mill, Emerson, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and others.




Ideals of Modernity
Professor Biagio Tassone
HONR 1016:16 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:16
CRN: 14949
MW 3:45-5:00

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:36 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15342
F 2:20-3:10

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

"What a piece of work is man" these words, penned by the English writer William Shakespeare in the 17th century, still speak to us today. The modern age was a time when human beings undertook new endeavors and the focus of their attention shifted from the outer to the inner and from eternity to the here and now. Life changed from being grounded on the static traditional ideas and customs into the search for progress guided by the ideals of reason, science, and individual liberty. In modernity the emergence of the secular state and the attainment of a plurality of goods is witnessed. But what we now call 'modernity' was actually the product of an astonishing series of intellectual revolutions. Building on the accomplishments of antiquity, much of modern thought decisively departs from ancient teachings and practice. In this seminar we will examine the fundamental ideals of modernity and their origins. We will begin with a consideration of the Christian roots of modernity, in which the seeds of modern individualism are planted. Next we turn to the scientific revolution, which empowers humanity, making us masters of nature. The scientific revolution indirectly lays the groundwork for new theories in politics which place popular sovereignty and individual liberty at the center of political life. Modernity also gave birth to its own critics, and in the final readings for the course we will consider thinkers who attempt to clarify the contradictions and costs of modern rationalism. Themes explored in this section will include: individualism, pluralism, secularism, the rise of natural science, and the influence of rationalism in both theoretical and social/political thought.




Freedom in Modernity
Professor Lee Okster
HONR 1016:17 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:17
CRN: 14953
MW 12:45-2:00

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:37 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15343
F 12:45-1:35

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

In this course we continue our exploration of questions concerning the human condition begun in the Fall semester's "Origins of Modern Thought" class. These questions focus on the notion of modernity. What does it mean to be "modern"? What defines modernity? What are the consequences of modernity's appeal to reason and science, rather than to tradition and religious faith? How does the modern turn toward secularism, science and rationality affect our understanding of the good life? How does this affect our understanding of politics and art? One way of understanding these questions is to approach them from the perspective of freedom and the role that individual freedom has played in our understanding of the person and of the role of politics and society in the good life. One of the themes of the modern age is its insistence on the individual liberty and the unfettered expression of one's ideas, as well as the ability to live one's life free of interference by the state and the weight of tradition. This has played out in politics (the French and American revolutions), aesthetics (artistic freedom, and freedom of speech), and morality (tolerance of the individual expression of conscience). Our readings this semester will examine the intellectual traditions that established freedom as the central value in modern life. They will analyze how freedom has been institutionalized in the market economy, the liberal state, and the self-reflective individual. We will begin with the Christian roots of modernity, which lay the seeds of modern individualism with its emphasis on inner, spiritual freedom. We will then turn to the scientific revolution and the understanding of rationality at the heart of this revolution. Science, in turn, laid the foundation for evolving theories in politics which place popular sovereignty and individual liberty at the center of political life. In the final section of the course, we will consider thinkers who attempt to clarify the contradictions of modern rationalism and realize the still unrealized ideals of the modern age.




What it Means to be Human
Professor Cheryl Vann
HONR 1016:18 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 16:18
CRN: 14957
TR 12:45-2:00

Required Discussion Section

HONR 1016:38 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15348
F 12:45-1:35

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; ESIA: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities

We will continue our journey to discover what it means to be human by investigating human thought and aspiration across literary genres, including letters, essays, poetry, plays, fiction, and autobiography. Our readings include selections from the Koran and the New Testament and from such authors as Boethius, Shakespeare, Milton, Augustine, Rousseau, Locke, Hobbes, Chaucer, Doestoevsky, Solzhenitsyn, Martin Luther King, Machiavelli, and Ghandi. We will explore texts separated from each other by centuries, religions, and cultures whose authors nonetheless employ similar literary devices to respond to the quest for love, both human and divine; the search the self; the discovery of ways of coping with human cruelty and absolutism; and the determination of value in a world roiled by change.




Scientific Reasoning and Discovery

Using a problem-based learning approach to explore topics in science, students in the Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Proseminar will learn to identify hidden regularities and patterns in Nature that may indicate fundamental unifying principles and laws; apply the "scientific method" to unearth these laws and principles; evaluate scientific information; describe the limitations of the scientific process; understand the importance of collecting accurate and precise data; develop a valid scientific hypothesis. Investigation will use the tools and methodologies of Geology, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Anthropology and other disciplines necessary to the task. The emphasis of inquiry in any given section might reflect the particular instructor's area of expertise.

Who Should Take These: Freshmen take one Scientific Reasoning and Discovery course each semester. Freshmen may also take an Honors Eligible Science instead of Scientific Reasoning and Discovery.

Revolutions in Astronomy
Professor Bethany Cobb
HONR 1034:10 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 34:10
CRN: 13861
MW 9:00-10:50

Fulfills: CCAS: Natural Science; ESIA: Science; GWSB: Science; SEAS: see advisor

This course explores the history and frontiers of modern astronomy. In the 400 years since Galileo first turned his telescope toward the heavens, the science of astronomy has gone through numerous radical shifts in our understanding of the universe. We will examine these great paradigm shifts, starting with the Copernican revolution, through Hubble's discovery of the expansion of the universe, to topics in astrophysics that remain controversial and perplexing even today such as extrasolar planets, black holes and dark matter. Both the concepts behind these astronomy revolutions and the associated mathematics and physics will be emphasized (there is, however, no mathematics prerequisites and the math level will be confined to algebra and geometry). We will consider historical and scientific perspectives on who was behind these radical discoveries, what evidence supports each revolution, and how astronomers and society have responded to each advance. Students in this course will develop an understanding of the types of modern astronomical topics discussed frequently in the popular science press and media and will come to appreciate how the science of astronomy is performed. Students will be expected to take an active role in the classroom, where we will explore topics through a combination of lecture, discussion, student presentations, group projects and mathematical exercises. Bethany E. Cobb, is an astronomer who received her Ph.D. at Yale University for research on massive stellar explosions called gamma-ray bursts. As a National Science Foundation Astronomy & Astrophysics postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, she recently used two telescopes in Chile (a 1.3m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and the 8m Gemini-South telescope on Cerro Pachon) to discover a supernova (SN 2009nz) associated with a gamma-ray burst that occurred on November 27, 2009.




Revelations in Astronomy
Professor Bethany Cobb
HONR 1034:11 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 34:11
CRN: 13514
TR 9:00-10:50

Fulfills: CCAS: Natural Science; ESIA: Science; GWSB: Science; SEAS: see advisor

This course explores the history and frontiers of modern astronomy. In the 400 years since Galileo first turned his telescope toward the heavens, the science of astronomy has gone through numerous radical shifts in our understanding of the universe. We will examine these great paradigm shifts, starting with the Copernican revolution, through Hubble's discovery of the expansion of the universe, to topics in astrophysics that remain controversial and perplexing even today such as extrasolar planets, black holes and dark matter. Both the concepts behind these astronomy revolutions and the associated mathematics and physics will be emphasized (there is, however, no mathematics prerequisites and the math level will be confined to algebra and geometry). We will consider historical and scientific perspectives on who was behind these radical discoveries, what evidence supports each revolution, and how astronomers and society have responded to each advance. Students in this course will develop an understanding of the types of modern astronomical topics discussed frequently in the popular science press and media and will come to appreciate how the science of astronomy is performed. Students will be expected to take an active role in the classroom, where we will explore topics through a combination of lecture, discussion, student presentations, group projects and mathematical exercises. Bethany E. Cobb, is an astronomer who received her Ph.D. at Yale University for research on massive stellar explosions called gamma-ray bursts. As a National Science Foundation Astronomy & Astrophysics postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, she recently used two telescopes in Chile (a 1.3m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and the 8m Gemini-South telescope on Cerro Pachon) to discover a supernova (SN 2009nz) associated with a gamma-ray burst that occurred on November 27, 2009.




Man's Place in Nature
Professor Bernard Wood
HONR 1034:12 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 34:12
CRN: 13515
TR 9:35-10:50

Fulfills: CCAS: Natural Science; ESIA: Science; GWSB: Science; SEAS: see advisor

The course uses the content and structure of T.H. Huxley's 1863 book 'Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature' as the framework for reviewing how our understanding of the relationship between modern humans and the natural world has evolved. It covers comparative primate biology and the fossil record, but it also explores the social and intellectual contexts of ideas and discoveries, as well as the biographies of the people who have influenced human origins-related research during the past 150 years.




The Science of Terrorism
Professor Laura Eisen
HONR 1034:MV - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 34:MV
CRN: 13513
TR 11:30-1:30

Fulfills: CCAS: Natural Science; ESIA: Science; GWSB: Science; SEAS: see advisor

Since the September 11 attacks, and the earlier explosion at the Oklahoma City federal building, Americans have been very concerned about the threat of terrorism. Federal, state, and local governments have taken steps to reduce the likelihood of another attack, and to enhance our ability to deal with one if necessary. But how do we know whether these steps reflect the true nature of potential risks? Should the remaining samples of the smallpox virus be destroyed in order to prevent terrorists from using them to make a biological weapon? What are the risks associated with the use of radioactive isotopes in hospitals and research labs? Why can't we carry more than three ounces of liquids onto airplanes? This course uses case studies based on historical events to explore the science behind the poisons, explosions, and biological weapons that terrorists have used in the past, or might use in the future. As they explore these topics, students learn some important ideas in the natural sciences, and also focus on the nature of science, and how science helps to answer questions that are important to society. Laura Eisen is Associate Professor of Chemistry and coordinator of the Science, Health and Medicine cohort of the Elizabeth Somers Women's Leadership Program. Her current professional interests relate to curricular changes and pedagogy in the natural sciences.




Chemistry of Progress
Professor Oscar Zimerman
HONR 1034:14 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 34:14
CRN: 16868
TR 2:20-3:35

Fulfills: CCAS: Natural Science; ESIA: Science; GWSB: Science; SEAS: see advisor

This course will trace the oddities of the history of chemistry, analyzing cultural and political influences on the ideas of chemists. We will follow the evolution of chemistry from the Stone Age beginnings of ceramics and metallurgy, through the rise and decline of alchemy, to the culmination of classical chemistry in the late nineteenth century. We will study the origin of ceramic, glass, paint and metallurgy, looking at the paradoxes, false starts and anomalies of chemistry and how geopolitics was altered by these "oddities." Examples will include how Chile (backed by England) entered in the Saltpeter War against Bolivia and Peru in 1879-84 to gain control over the mineral deposits and how chemistry played the key role of making Germany self sufficient in fertilizer and explosives just before WWI and how these two events are connected.




Vitalage: A biofuels start up company
Professor Houston Miller
HONR 1034:13 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 34:13
CRN: 16867
TR 9:35am-10:50am

Fulfills: CCAS: Natural Science; ESIA: Science; GWSB: Science; SEAS: see advisor

This course will be a continuation of our fall seminar course in which we learned about the production of liquid fuels from the cultivation of algae. We frame this problem in the context of a "start up" company that wishes to attract private and public funding for our venture. In the first semester, a species was selected for study and initial efforts to cultivate algae and extract fuels began. In the second semester, we will continue to optimize fuel yields, work more towards "scale up", and study technologies for fuel processing and assessment of fuel qualities. As before the group will be divided into groups that focus on technology, marketing, and business, However, all participants are expected to contribute to the lab work and develop a firm grasp of the background technology. The course functions more as a research laboratory than as an instructional laboratory course. A great of deal of maturity and self-motivation as well as an ability to work in a team is expected. Participation in the first semester is not a pre-requisite for enrollment. PLEASE NOTE: Registration for this course will be available on Friday, November 5 to students enrolled in the fall semester of HONR 33:12 via RTF-EZ submitted to the Honors office by 5pm. Any remaining seats in the course will be available online beginning November 15 and 16, when freshmen with last names L-Z and A-K respectively have another opportunity to register. The seats will be split evenly by the Registrar's office between those two days.




Honors Eligible Science Alternatives

Honors Eligible Science Alternatives are an alternative to the regular Scientific Reasoning and Discovery courses offered through the University Honors Program. While most the courses below are not technically Honors Courses, you can take them to fulfill your Honors Science Requirement. Complete registration information for these courses can be found in the online Schedule of Classes.

Who Should Take These: Freshmen may take an Honors Designated Science Alternative course in place of the regular Scientific Reasoning and Discovery course. Freshmen may take an Honors Designated Science Alternative course even if they took Scientific Reasoning and Discovery during the Fall semester.

The following is a list of approved "Honors eligible" science courses by department:

Honors
Honors General Chemistry II with Professor Martin Zysmilich (HONR 2175:13)

Biology
All sections of BISC 11: Introductory Biology: Cells and Molecules
All sections of BISC 12: Introductory Biology: The Biology of Organisms
Any 100-level Biology lab course (as long as appropriate prerequisites have been met)

Chemistry
All sections of CHEM 11 or CHEM 12: General Chemistry
Any 100-level Chemistry lab course (as long as appropriate prerequisites have been met)

Geology
GEOL 001: Physical Geology
Any 100-level Geology lab course (as long as appropriate pre-requisites have been met)

Physics
Any section of PHYS 11: General Physics I
Any section of PHYS 12: General Physics II
Any section of PHYS 21: University Physics I
Any section of PHYS 22: University Physics II
Any section of PHYS 23: University Physics III
Any 100-level Physics lab course (assuming appropriate pre-requisites have been met)

CRNS, class meeting times, and other pertinent registration information for the "honors eligible" courses can be found via the online Schedule of Classes.


Self and Society

These courses encourage students to grapple with contemporary social issues, problems, concepts, and complexities by recognizing and understanding the different approaches, methods, and tools of various social sciences. Some sections of Self & Society provide an introduction to specific disciplines. These sections offer a foundation in the language, perspectives, methods, and research approaches of a specific social science in a small-class setting. Other sections focus on a contemporary social issue, problem, or question, using a multi-disciplinary approach.

These 2175-courses and 0700-courses also fulfill the Self and Society requirement: (HONR 2044:10) Honors Introductory Economics, (HONR 2175:10) Sex, Lies, and Videotape: an Examination of the 1st Amendment, (HONR 2175:14) Narrative Medicine: Stories of Illness, Patients, and Caregivers in American History, (HONR 2175:15) Criminology, (IAFF 0702:10) Holocaust Memory.

Who Should Take These: Upperclassmen must take two Self and Society courses over the course of the sophomore, junior, or senior years. They do not need to be taken in any particular order.

Modernization, Development, and their Discontents
Professor Robert Shepherd
HONR 2048:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 48:10
CRN: 16220
TR 2:20-3:35

Equivalent: Anthropology 151, 'The Anthropology of Development'

Fulfills: CCAS: Social and Behavioral Sciences; ESIA: Anthropology/Geography/Public Health; International Development Studies; International Economics

This course examines the goals, assumptions, and processes of modernization and development. Drawing from sociology, economics, and anthropology, course readings and discussions will center on the following questions about development: What are the historical origins of development as a planned process? What are the theoretical assumptions embedded within development? What is the relationship between development practices and modernization? What can we learn about development through an examination of detailed ethnographic case studies? This course will be organized into three sections. We will begin by examining the historical background and theoretical underpinnings of development by examining its roots in theories of modernization. We will then turn to the practices of development and how these practices relate to political goals such as state building. Finally, we will examine the post-1990 shift in development thinking and practice, from a focus on state-directed social change to an embrace of market forces and non-governmental organizations as the solutions to development problems. Our focus throughout will not be on prescribing how to 'develop', but on an intellectually rigorous analysis of the claims made in the name of 'development'.




Gender and Sexuality
Professor Lynette Osborne
HONR 2048:12 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 48:12
CRN: 16222
TR 12:45-2:00

Equivalent: SOC 175

Fulfills: CCAS: Social and Behavioral Sciences; GWSB: Moral Reasoning Elective

The objective of this course is to provide students with a critical examination of the roles of men and women across time, with particular attention to sex/gender differences and inequality in the contemporary United States. The origins, goals and tactics of the recent women and men's liberation movements will be explored. Gender differences and inequality in the areas of sexuality, marriage, family, education, employment and income are some of the areas that will be covered. We will also explore the social factors that maintain and may minimize gender inequality.




The Politics of Foreign Trade
Professor Jeffrey Becker
HONR 2048:13 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 48:13
CRN: 16798
W 6:10-8:00

Fulfills: CCAS: Social and Behavioral Sciences ESIA: Comparative Political, Economic, & Social Systems; International Development Studies; International Economics; International Politics concentrations

Few issues are as contentious as the debates surrounding free trade, "fair trade," and globalization. Yet what are the impacts of foreign trade on a country's domestic and foreign policy? This course provides an overview of the politics of foreign trade, examining both domestic and international political components of international trade policy, as well as the political consequences of the growth of foreign trade. The course will include both economic theory and practical case studies focusing on advanced developed economies such as the United States, emerging markets such as China, and developing states on the periphery of the international economy. This course serves two broad goals; to provide students with an introduction to concepts involved in the study of international political economy (IPE) and the intersection between politics and trade more generally, and to help students develop the necessary research and analytical skills required in all sciences, be they social or natural. This includes evaluating theoretical claims, gathering, evaluating, and applying independently researched data, identifying and measuring critical variables, and determining causality in observing phenomena. Furthermore, as a Self and Society course in the University Honors program, we will: 1) Explore the different paradigms and methods social scientists use to investigate similar topics, issues and questions. 2) Recognize the value of understanding the logic of and assumptions behind these different perspectives




Arts and Humanities

The Arts and Humanities proseminars are designed to deepen students' understanding of a wide array of approaches to and themes in the arts and the humanities. Courses in this proseminar employ critical tools drawn from a variety of disciplines to probe foundational questions of what it means to be human, what are human concerns and how humans create meaning. Courses under 2053W will develop analytical and research tools from inter- or multi-disciplinary approaches, whereas courses under 2054W offer focused seminars in one of the humanities.

These 2175-courses and 0700-courses also fulfill the Arts & Humanities requirement: (HONR 2175:12) Belief, (HONR 2175:16) Bookmarks of Jewish History.

All Arts & Humanities are WIDs.

Who Should Take These: Upperclassmen take two Arts & Humanities courses over the course of the sophomore, junior, or senior years. They do not need to be taken in any particular order.

Arts as a Bridge
Professor Cheryl Vann
HONR 2053W:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 053W:10
CRN: 16223
TR 9:35-10:50

The theme of this course is the idea that literature structures the mental world, architecture the physical world, and art is the bridge that connects the two. This course is comprised of five geographical units including China, Great Britain, India, Russia, and the United States. We will explore each unit chronologically, beginning with a national hero myth/narrative, move to an architectural monument that materially expresses these national characteristics or visions, and progress to one or two specific artistic genres that express the nation's perceptions of itself that we discovered in the hero narrative. We will begin with the old and end with the new within each unit, tracing aesthetic and historical/political movements that have impacted these cultures over time. Using this geographical/chronological approach, each student will create her/his own individual unit encompassing the hero narrative, a representative architectural monument, and an example of performative/creative art, enabling students to explore familiar talents and interests and to develop new ones. These individual units will be shared with the class at the end of the semester.




WarZones, WonderLands, and WanderLusts
Professor Rebecca Boylan
HONR 2053W:11 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 053W:11
CRN: 16224
TR 2:20-3:35

This section of A&WC, the global and genre circuit course, explores what art is, does, and means, and why we value it in order that we might begin to probe the larger questions of how we know a culture through experiencing and contemplating its art and how we know a work of art through experiencing and contemplating its culture. The largest question of the course is to contemplate how this burgeoning knowledge of the interstices of art and art helps us further contemplate what it means to be human - the thought work begun in Origins. To stimulate this time and space travel via Arts and their Cultures, we will read Cynthia Freeland's (Professor Philosophy at the University of Houston) lively and thoughtful, But is it art?, which examines, through several philosophers' theories, the work of art and artists around the world and throughout time en route to muse on the work, meaning and value of art to the humanities. Freeland leads us in a study of artworks within their cultures; within art spaces (and markets!), such as museums, palaces, monuments, cathedrals, and urban and rural landscapes; and in relation to their artists. Newly armed with these humanities-based reflections, we will first examine WAR as both culture and art, viewing, for example, the Spanish Civil War through Robert Capa's photographs of lyrical realism beside Del Toro's fantastical images in Pan's Labyrinth. Other possible WarZones include Japan (swords, scrolls, and anime), Iran (sand narrative), the U.S. (poetry), Italy (the epic), Germany (film) and Russia (music and film). Some of the questions we will be asking of war's culture and art include why does human nature both desire and abhor violence and torture? What is the argument for Just War? Is peace the opposite of war? How do we confront war's suffering? How and why does War provide us a raw, unplugged view of the best and worst of who we are as humans? Of both our assurance and our doubt? WONDER provides us a lens to discover "the Other" - to ponder, be shocked (even aghast!) and amazed at those, as yet, untried, untraveled, unknown, and un-imagined perspectives and realities. We will examine both art and culture as they provoke the action and reflect the meaning of Wonder's imagination and courage. In order to experience the intellectual, ethical and emotional conundrums revealed when we wonder, we'll consider works by those witty English (Carroll, Wilde, and Dickens) as well as visual artists of the 20th and 21st Centuries from all over the world - from Tibetan mandala paintings to Australian Aborigine prints to Francis Bacon or Lucian Freud portraits to Pollock's abstracts to Hitchcock's thrillers to the digital revolution. We will complete the semester by WANDERING to those cultures and arts/artworks that we simply can't resist - that draw us in out of our desire and lust for beauty, harmony, and order. For it is part of our deepest happiness to recognize and respond to Art's ability not only to disturb and challenge human nature, as perhaps is the overriding work of War's and Wonder's Art, but also to please the eye, soothe the emotions, and redeem the soul - in short, to affirm our idealized self. In its focus on individual taste, this part of the course asks the students to select artworks for study and to craft the questions that will provoke critical thinking about why we desire and even need Art by identifying those works and their composition, form, elements, and their effects that delight us. Will it be Vermeer's or Rembrandt's tantalizing illuminated portraits emerging from shadows? French Impressionists? Turkish miniatures? Cunningham's sculptural dances? Campion's films? Woolf's poetic and ghostly prose? Lady Gaga's mesmerizing rhythms? Chinese porcelains? Students will engage in a rigorous writing process of draft, conference, and revision of 2 short papers (4 pages each) and one final paper (12-15 pages). All of these papers are critical analyses, creating and developing argumentative responses to questions the course addresses, using various artworks as the primary source material and historical, cultural, and theoretical secondary sources.




Buddhist Philosophy
Professor Eyal Aviv
HONR 2054W:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 054W:10
CRN: 16225
MW 3:45-5:00

This course will introduce students to the rich tradition of Buddhist philosophy, its analytical approach as well the way it supports and systematizes its spiritual message. Through conversation and active participation, students in the proseminar will engage with the unique questions Buddhist philosophy attempts to resolve as well as its different solutions . Students will familiarize themselves with concepts and debates within the Buddhist intellectual tradition and will learn about the way Buddhist philosophy developed historically. We will read a variety of Buddhist texts from the Buddhist canon as well as texts by eminent Buddhist thinkers such as Nagarjuna and Vasubandhu. A special attention will be given to the theory of non-self and the way Buddhists reflect on what it means to be human.




Nietzsche and the Crisis of Modernity
Professor William Winstead
HONR 2054W:11 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 054W:11
CRN: 16227
T 3:30-6:00

Nietzsche is widely viewed as a central figure in contemporary intellectual debates. His works chart the breakup of traditional systems of meaning and morality in modernity, disclosing the dangerous consequences that result for individuals and societies in the West. Nietzsche is equally, and more importantly, a philosopher of transitions-a philosopher of bridges and passageways, of flight and self-overcoming. This seminar will examine the twofold character of Nietzsche's project, a project that reveals the crisis of modernity while simultaneously heralding the possibility to a new, joyous, life-affirming mode of existence. Nietzsche discovers the model for this higher form of life in classical antiquity, and we will begin our course by reading his famous analysis of the tragic culture of ancient Athens, found in The Birth of Tragedy. This work also reveals the origin of the crisis of modernity in occidental rationalism, and serves as the foundation for Nietzsche's subsequent efforts to overcome that crisis, found in Thus Spoke Zarathustra and On the Genealogy of Morality. As we read these texts, we will not only work to understand Nietzsche's analysis of modernity, but also his fundamental thoughts, encapsulated in his concepts of nihilism, Socratism, the Dionysian and Apollinian, the death of God, the will to power, the superman, the eternal return, and master and slave morality.




Transgressing Thresholds of Realism: Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury in Context
Professor Rebecca Boylan
HONR 2054W:13 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 054W:13
CRN: 16229
TR 3:45-5:00

This humanities seminar travels to Bloomsbury at the turn of the 20th Century. At the heart of our study are Virginia Woolf and her writing. To contextualize her "Murder of the Angel in the House", we will first consider how her own identity and yearnings imagined visionary gender roles and boundaries in her reading of Shakespeare. After a brief introduction to Woolf's intellectual and surrealist perspectives in perusing some of her essays and short fiction, we will brave our own new reading of As You Like It. This will allow us to appreciate Woolf's fascination with the significance of performance, the complexity of gender identity, and Time's influence on perception as we enjoy her literary romp, Orlando, reflecting on the questions raised by the protagonist's changes in costume, gender, and time. The second and most significant portion of the course will situate Woolf within the Bloomsbury Group - focusing on these personalities and their conversations as representing the artistic, philosophic, and literary visions of London and beyond, spanning the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In many ways, visiting these thinkers, writers, and visual artists provides us admission into a most erudite and creative symposium: John Maynard Keynes, revolutionary economist and art collector who was married to a Russian ballerina; Lytton Strachey, revolutionary biographer, whose childhood might have tempted Dickens' horror and sympathy; Vanessa Bell, sister of Virginia, whose photographs and paintings influenced not only her own time but burgeoned Modern Art on both sides of the pond; Clive Bell, husband of Vanessa and aesthetic philosopher; E. M. Forster, a novelist whose fascination with beauty as ghostly transgressor intrigues us beside that of Woolf's female ghosts. Perusing excerpts from these thinkers, studying their visual art in such outstanding scholarly portfolios as The Art of Bloomsbury, viewing films of Forster's A Room With A View and Howards End, as well as scanning briefly the Great War as an ever-present spirit within the Bloomsbury Group will allow us to discover the complex array of origins of Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse. In appreciating contexts of Woolf, we will not only look beyond but also within her novels to identify and pull out the legends and poetry, gossamer threads of Woolf's narrative design. We will complete the semester reading Saturday by Ian McEwan, a 21st-century novel that re-visits Woolf's London and many of her perceptions of beauty, chaos, human resistance to change, madness and illness, as well as the reality of war. Course participants will prepare a presentation on some personality, perception, or idea prompted by the Bloomsbury Group, and write two short papers and one longer paper, all of which incorporate critical thinking and research.




0700-Series

Courses ending with numbers in the 700s are taught by distinguised scholars who hold appointments as University Professors. With the approval of the department or program concerned, appropriate University Professor courses may be taken to satisfy degree program requirements. See below how these courses may apply to your Honors requirements; inquire with departments as to how they may apply to a major or minor.

Who Should Take These: Anyone may take these courses, but they are recommended for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors.

Holocaust Memory
Professor Walter Reich
IAFF 0702:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: IAFF 702:10
CRN: 17003
T 5:10-7:00

Fulfills: CCAS: Social and Behavioral Science; History Department Category C (European History); Judaic Studies Program; ESIA: Comparative Political, Economic and Social Systems; Conflict and Security; Contemporary Cultures and Societies; International Politics; Europe and Eurasia; HONR: Self & Society

The development, representation, uses and misuses of Holocaust memory. The writings and testimonies of victims and survivors; the challenge of memorializing and writing about the Holocaust; its implications for ongoing genocides and crimes against humanity; and its increasing vulnerability to intellectual, cultural, historical and political misuse.




Ethics in International Affairs
Professor Michael Barnett
IAFF 0703:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: IAFF 703:10
CRN: 17017
TR 2:20-3:35

Fulfills: HONR: Self and Society; GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective; ESIA Old Curriculum: International Politics Requirement, Concentrations: Conflict and Security, International Politics; ESIA New Curriculum: Advanced Fundamentals Requirement: Internatinoal & Comparative Politics, Concentrations: Conflict Resolution, Security Policy, International Politics.

This course is designed to introduce students to ethics in international affairs. Toward that end, it has three guiding questions. First, what role does ethics play in international affairs? There is a longstanding tradition, closely associated with realpolitik, that insists that states are guided by power and interests, nothing more and nothing less. Although there are lots of examples of amoral behavior, if we look around we find lots of counter examples in which states seem to consider not only what is expedient but also what seems like the right thing to do. In fact, it is hard to imagine how we have international initiatives to reduce malaria further global health, end global poverty, educate children, and end crimes against humanity without a heavy dose of ethical concerns. The second question is: why are ethical considerations are so prominent in the decision making of states? Have states gone soft? Third, what are the different metrics we can use to evaluate whether international action and outcomes are ethical? On what grounds can we conclude, for instance, that the United States invasion of Iraq was either legitimate or illegitimate? Should we judge action as ethical based on the means that are used or the ends that are accomplished? Do ends justify means? By acknowledging that there are different metrics we can use we immediately confront the possibility of ethical dilemmas -- how the pursuit of one ideal might negatively impact another. One last point: although courses in ethics in international affairs tend to focus on the conduct of states, we also want to examine the conduct of other actors in global affairs - including those in the classroom.

Because the best way to understand the meaning and practice of ethics is by examining them in real circumstances and situations, the course will examine these guiding questions in various areas, including the laws of war, poverty, global health, and human rights.

Course evaluation will be determined by a midterm, a paper assignment, and a final examination.




Introductory and Special Topics

The University Honors Program offers Introductory courses and Special Topics courses (2175s) which are upper-level courses. These courses provide unique and challenging topics unlikely to be found elsewhere. Use them to meet requirements or as electives to satisfy your personal interests.

Who Should Take These: Any student who meets any and all pre-requisites may take these courses. 2175 courses considered to be more appropriate for sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Honors Introductory Economics
Professor Michael Bradley
HONR 2044:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 44:10
CRN: 10318
TR 11:10-12:25

Equivalent: ECON 12

Fulfills: CCAS: Social and Behavioral Sciences; ESIA: Econ 12 Requirement; HONR: Self and Society

HONR 043, combined with HONR 044, satisfies the same curriculum requirements as ECON 011 and ECON 012 and serve as the prerequisite for upper-level economics courses. This section of HONR 044 goes beyond ECON 012 by covering more advanced macroeconomics topics.




Sex, Lies, and Videotape: an Examination of the 1st Amendment
Professor Jill Kasle
HONR 2175:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 175:10
CRN: 11550
MW 12:45-2:00

Fulfills: CCAS: Social and Behavioral Science; ESIA: Elective; GWSB: Upper level Non-Bus Elective; SEAS: Social Science Elective; HONR: Self and Society Requirement PSC: 100-level Elective

Honors 125: Justice and the Legal System is a prerequisite for this course. This course is an introduction to the study of the First Amendment from the legal (as opposed to the philosophical or political) point of view. The course covers the basic principles of freedom of speech (including the regulation of harmful or subversive speech, libel, obscenity and indecent speech, fighting words, and commercial speech), freedom of association, and freedom of religion. The course will consider the intersection of the First Amendment and cyberspace and cover such topics as the regulation of speech on the Internet.




Leadership - in theory and in practice
Professor Gerald Kauvar and Stephen Joel Trachtenberg
HONR 2175:11 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 175:11
CRN: 16706
T 12:45-3:15

Fulfills: HONR: Self and Society; CCAS: Social & Behavioral Science; GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective

Students will meet (lunch provided!) with Prof. Kauvar and President Trachtenberg weekly to explore leadership in theory and in practice. The first weeks of the semester will feature guests to discuss their own leadership experiences: varieties of leadership with Michael Macoby, leadership in industry and in higher education with E. Grady Bogue, leadership in the absence of specified authority with ADM Thad Allen, leadership in the military and the government with Lawrence Wilkerson, leadership in the public eye with Michael Chertoff. In the later weeks of the course students will be divided into two groups, rotate roles within the university context, and prepare recommendations in position papers and PowerPoint presentations to the President (the faculty members teaching the course) on how to deal with issues that arise in case studies.




Belief
Professor Peter Caws
HONR 2175:12 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 175:12
CRN: 12117
F 11:10-1:00

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities; GWSB: Humanities/ Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective A&H; HONR: Arts & Humanities

Belief is a central concept in philosophy, psychology, and politics, and especially in religion. Beliefs can give comfort and confidence; they can also be used to justify conflict and cruelty. Does everybody have them? (Does anybody need them?) What are their foundations, their varieties, their logical structure? How do they relate to knowledge, to opinion, to feeling, to experience? Can they be chosen? What responsibilities follow from holding them? What are our own beliefs, and are we willing to challenge them? (Can challenging people's beliefs do them harm?) The seminar will examine the concept of belief in all its aspects, and follow some of its problems and manifestations in history, philosophy, literature. and other disciplines. It will involve quite a lot of reading and writing. We'll read for example W. K. Clifford's classic 19th-century book The Ethics of Belief, and Eric Hoffer's 20th-century one The True Believer, as well as some testimonies to diverse beliefs by figures like Tolstoy, E. M. Forster, Bertrand Russell and others. We will also look at the grounds of religious belief and its role in current politics. However the line the seminar eventually takes will be largely a function of the interests of its participants (including me).




Honors General Chemistry II
Professor Martin Zysmilich
HONR 2175:13 - 4 Credits
Formerly: HONR 175:13
CRN: 15247
TR 9:35-10:50

Lab for Honors General Chemistry II

HONR 2175:M01 - 0 Credits
CRN: 15253
R 3:00-7:00

Fulfills: HONR: Honors Science Course Requirements; CCAS: Natural Science; ESIA: Science; GWSB: Science; SEAS: see advisor

This course is the second half of the two semester sequence. This semester's laboratory will be more research-oriented than Chemistry 12. Prerequisite: Chem 11 or equivalent.




Narrative Medicine: Stories of Illness, Patients, and Caregivers in American History
Professor Vanessa Northington Gamble
HONR 2175:14 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 175:14
CRN: 16707
T 11:10-1:00

Fulfills: CCAS: Humanities GWSB: Humanities/ Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective HONR: Self & Society

This seminar will focus on narratives as a mechanism to study the history of American medicine in the 20th century. It will use various styles of narrative such as historical accounts, memoirs, short stories, essays, and films. These stories will provide a framework to examine several themes in the history of medicine including illness from the patient's perspective, the roles of nurses and physicians, cultural representations of disease, the state of medical knowledge, and societal responses to disease.




Criminology
Professor William Chambliss
HONR 2175:15 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 175:15
CRN: 16800
R 3:45-6:15

Fulfills: CCAS: Social & Behavioral Sciences GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective HONR: Self & Society

In the modern world few subjects capture the imagination or receive as much attention as crime. You cannot pick up a newspaper, pass a bookstore, or turn on the radio or television without being bombarded with accounts of crime. A subject so often discussed and debated is bound to create widely disparate and contradictory perspectives on the subject. It is the goal of this course to cut through the popular images and learn what the systematic study of crime by social scientists can teach us. Research on crime has traditionally been concentrated in the field of sociology although it is often the subject of study by psychologists, political scientists, and anthropologists and at times even geographers. In this course we will incorporate the results of research and theory from all of the social sciences that have contributed to our knowledge about crime. By studying the results of scientific research we will be able to evaluate widely held popular views about crime and compare these to the findings of systematic research and theory. It is important that you keep an open-mind. Because crime is a topic that is so often discussed it is a subject about which people have strong opinions. Evaluating the validity of these opinions and their generality will comprise a major focus of the course. Students will explore the wide variety and types of criminal behavior and how different types of crime are found in different social milieus; understand the difference between the public image of crime and the findings of systematic research by social scientists; research the major paradigms and theories that underlie criminological research and thinking; develop the tools to critically analyze the logical structure and the empirical validity of criminological theories; briefly experience some facet of the criminal justice system as it takes place in real life through policing, the courts, a jail or a prison; and, finally, be able to conceptualize and carry out a research project that answers an important issue in the field of criminology.




The Promotion of Democracy
Professor Ruben Perina
HONR 2184:10 - 1 Credits
CRN: 11052
2/15, 2/22, 3/1, 3/8 4:00-6:00

This course will provide a better knowledge and understanding of the role played by an international organization such as the Organization of American States (OAS) in the defense and promotion of democracy. We will introduce a theory of democracy and different approaches to promoting it from an international organization's perspective, with special emphasis on the concrete and practical activities to fulfill this purpose and mandate. The course will identify the instruments of "high politics" at the diplomatic level and "low politics" such as electoral observation missions and technical assistance. We will explore the limitations and tensions between the promotion of democracy and the long held principle of non-intervention, and will examine what critics have to say about this new OAS role. Dr. Perina teaches in the Latin American and Hemisphere Program of the Elliott School. From 2004 to 2010, he directed the Program of Support for Legislative Institutions in the Department of Modernization of the State of the OAS. Between 1994 and 2004, he was the director of Strategic Program in the Unit for the Promotion of Democracy, focusing on democratic institution building and on training programs fro young political leaders. Dr. Perina also served as Chief of OAS Electoral Observation Missions in the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Guatemala, Colombia and Paraguay. He holds a PhD in International Relations from the University of Pennsylvania, is a native of Argentina and has resided in DC since 1980. He can be reached at rmperina@gwu.edu. Students who wish to register for The Promotion of Democracy should fill out an RTF-EZ and drop it off at the Honors office with the following information: Forms will be accepted on students' assigned registration days, and during open registration (November 17-January 9). This class is limited to 12 students.




Bookmarks of Jewish History
Professor David Schwartz
HONR 2175:16 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 175:16
CRN: 17001
W 2:00-4:30

Equivalent: Cross-listed as HIST 3001:10 CRN: 16310

Fulfills: HONR: Arts and Humanities; CCAS: Humanities; GWSB: Non-Business Elective/Unrestricted Elective

Are you interested in learning more about Jewish history and Jewish books? Do you want to be part of the first group of GW students to go behind the scenes to discover the remarkable riches of the Judaica collections of the Library of Congress and the Kiev Library in Gelman, all within the structure of a class setting? Would you like to take a course where the primary sources are the original texts and manuscripts themselves, many of them centuries old and exceedingly rare? If yes, consider taking "Bookmarks of Jewish History", a seminar in the history of the Jewish book that will be offered for the first time in Spring 2011. In this course we will learn about the history of books in general and Jewish books in particular, exploring how texts were made, circulated and read. We will also learn about the ways in which books gave rise to new conceptions of knowledge and authority and even new ideas of what it meant to be Jewish. And we will do all this on site at the Library of Congress and the Kiev Library, in the physical presence of the works we are studying. Admission to the course is on the approval of the instructor. There are no prerequisites, but interested students must be able to demonstrate that they have the necessary background and competence to take an advanced, upper-level seminar in History and Judaic Studies. Some knowledge of Hebrew would be helpful but is not required. For more information about "Booksmarks", please contact Prof. D. Schwartz at dbs50@gwu.edu or (202) 994-2397.




Contract Courses

All Honors Contract courses must be registered through a Registration Transaction (Add/Drop) form and be accompanied by a signed Honors Contract. Neither form can be processed without the other. Written work is graded by your faculty advisor, but a copy of the written work must be turned in to the Honors Office for our records.

Who Should Take These: Anyone who is interested.

Honors Course Conversion

HONR 2180:10 - 0 Credits
Formerly: HONR 180:10
CRN: 11050

Juniors and Seniors may receive Honors credit for non-Honors 100-level courses within their major or minor by agreeing to work closely on a project with a faculty member that is done in addition to the regular coursework. The student and professor should meet at least five times during the semester.




Honors Undergraduate Research

HONR 2184:10 - 1 Credits
Formerly: HONR 184:10
CRN: 11052

The Honors Program gives credit for independent study work completed in cooperation with a professor. Each student needs a faculty member to oversee his or her project and assign a grade. The student and the professor must meet at least ten times during the semester.




Honors Research Assistantship

HONR 2185:10 - 1 Credits
Formerly: HONR 185:10
CRN: 12586

Juniors and Seniors pursuing a directed research project in collaboration with a faculty advisor may receive credit for the project with Honors Program approval. Students participating in Honors 185 will be actively engaged in the scholarly research of the supervising faculty member. The Research Assistantship may be repeated once for credit.




Senior Thesis and Capstone

Students can fulfill the senior thesis requirement by completing the department-approved courses or research that is associated with their major, or students may choose to take one of the following courses offered through the Honors program.

Students can fulfill the Global Issues Project requirement by taking the Global Issues Project class. Note that students who entered in 2006 are not required to take a Global Issues Project.

Who Should Take These: All seniors must complete a Senior Thesis Requirement. Students who entered 2007 or later also take a Global Issues Project. Juniors may take Global Issues Project or pursue senior thesis requirements, but should meet with an Honors advisor first.

Honors ESIA Group Project
Professor Lawrence Wilkerson
HONR 4196:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 196:10
CRN: 12959
T 12:45-3:15

Does the National Security Council Really 'Run the World'?* If so, how well does it do it? This seminar course will provide insights into and offer concrete evidence of the changes to the national security decision-making process since the enactment of the 1947 National Security Act and, in particular, demonstrate how the first George W. Bush administration (2001-2004) was unique in the 50-plus year history of that Act. Moreover, the course will offer opportunities to examine the impact of this uniqueness on the conduct of American foreign policy and seek to evaluate whether this uniqueness is a boon or a danger to the American democracy. For the 2001-2004 time frame, actual decisions and the results of their execution will be examinated in detail, to include those associated with US policy vis-a-vis Iraq, Iran, North Korea, Japan, China, Taiwan, Syria, Cuba and Venezuela. HONR: Global Issues Project; thesis; ESIA: Intnl. Pol. Group & ESIA Special Honors (check with Elliott advisor about eligibility)




Honors Senior Thesis

HONR 4198:10 - 3 Credits
Formerly: HONR 198:10
CRN: 11282
R 2:20-4:50

The Honors Senior Thesis is a one or two-semester independent study to complete a senior thesis. This course is for students who ar NOT doing departmental honors. Any student considering the Honors Senior Thesis option should contact an Honors Advisor. This course is only open to Seniors. Students not pursuing special honors in their department and unable to find a independent study thesis advisor may be registered for 198 to join a thesis workshop with Prof. Hoyt-O'Connor Thursdays 2:20 to 4:50 in the Honors Basement Conference Room.




Understanding the End of the Book Age - Honors Capstone Experience
Professor Peter Rollberg
HONR 4199:10 - 1 Credits
Formerly: HONR 199:10
CRN: 14895
T 5:10-7:00

The Age of the Book that began with Gutenberg's invention of the printing press more than 500 years ago is approaching its final phase. Intellectuals from a variety of disciplines - including sociologists, literary critics, and neuroscientists - are debating the consequences of this development. Will it lead to a cultural impoverishment of the modern free market civilization, or even to a weakened capacity for independent critical thinking? Or will the transition to digital forms of communication expand our mental and intellectual faculties?

The Spring 2011 Honors Capstone will address these problems and related issues of individual mental development and culture as a whole. It builds on the Fall 2010 Capstone, The Reading Brain and the Art of Reading, but shifts the focus from neurological and educational to socio-cultural aspects. As in the Fall course, I have structured this capstone so that every student can approach its theme in an individual way, giving them a chance to reflect on the role that books play in their intellectual life and on how this role might be undergoing specific changes.

The books that we are going to use in this course are The Gutenberg Elegies by Sven Birkerts, Distracted by Maggie Jackson, and The Case for Books by Robert Darnton.

I will hold one two-hour class per week, on Tuesdays at 5:00 p.m. in the Honors clubroom for the students who enroll in the 3-credit course. Those students who prefer to enroll in the 1-credit option will have to attend four out of a total of 14 classes. Concluding the capstone will be a paper which shall reflect insights gained from our deliberations in class and online. The final grade is letter grade for the 3-credit group and P/NP for the 1-credit group.

The course will benefit from your expertise gained over the first three years of your undergraduate study. I do look forward to your contributions and expect them to enrich my own understanding of a phenomenon that at times seems threatening, at times full of positive potential.




Registration

Listed are a number of documents that will make selecting your courses and meeting the requirements of the University Honors Program easier each semester. Typically, these newsletters and forms are updated annually or each semester, so please return to this page often to get the latest, most accurate guidelines.

RTF-EZ Form to register for courses unavailable online

RTF-EZ Form

Get your advising hold removed so that you can register for classes

Advisor Approval Form

If you're going to study abroad, you must inform the University Honors Program

Study Abroad Form

Graduating this year? You'll need this information to graduate with Honors

Graduation Form

Senior Thesis/Senior Seminar Information Packet

Special Honors Verification Form

If you have any other questions, you should look here

The Student Handbook

(This handbook is for students entering this year. For previous years, see our Forms & Docs Page)

Still can't find exactly what you're looking for? You may be able to find it at the Forms & Documents page.