Courses

FILM PROGRAM COURSES:

FILM 2151 - Film Theory
A reading-intensive immersion in classical film aesthetics and a survey of the theoretical and critical canon of cinema literature.

FILM 2152 - Genres of Film
An exploration of the relationship between cinematic structure and narrative content in various types of film.

FILM 2153 - History of World Cinema I
The first semester covering 100 years of international cinematic history from an aesthetic and political point of view.

FILM 2154 - History of World Cinema II
The second semester covering 100 years of international cinematic history from an aesthetic and political point of view.

FILM 2155 - Screenwriting

CROSS-PROGRAM COURSES:

AH/AMST 1070 - The American Cinema
History and criticism of American films. The course will enable the student to recognize and evaluate cinema techniques, to express the evaluation clearly in writing, and to understand the role of films in the context of American culture.

AMST 1100 - Politics and Film
This class will examine the relationship between politics and film by specifically investigating how American films interpret and challenge political power in America. (Fall, alternate years)

CHIN/WSTU 3136W - Chinese Women in Myth, Lit, Film
Women's position in Chinese cultural and political life from prehistoric myth to the present time. Confucian writing, traditional theatre, and films and novels set in China. A general survey of Chinese history establishes the context for discussions of cultural and political phenomena, such as foot binding and the one-child policy. (Fall and spring)

CHIN 3162 - Chinese Culture Through Film
Survey of the Chinese cultural heritage presented through films. Topics include literature, philosophy, art, religion, and social history from prehistorical times to the modern era. Lectures and discussion in English. (Fall and spring)

CLAS 3202 - Arab Film and Culture
This course explores the postcolonial evolution of national Arab cinema as an institution and industry whose product is film. It provides a critical and informed sense of the contexts in which films are and have been produced, disseminated and consumed within the Arab world. In covering several important facts of Arab culture, this course focuses on cultural norms and historical shifts in those norms as symbolized in film within the second half of the twentieth century. Film images and sounds across a broad range of a representative sample of film types topics and themes/genres are analyzed for generation of meaning. Taught in English. (Spring)

ENGL 3450 – Topics in Shakespeare Studies (When topic is Shakespeare on Film)
Critical study of a particular aspect of Shakespeare's work, or of a distinctive approach to the plays. Projected topics: Shakespeare on film, the history plays and Elizabethan England, 18th-century rewritings of Shakespeare, Shakespeare as poet, cultural materialist readings of Shakespeare.

ENGL/TRDA 3250 - Intermediate Dramatic Writing
This course is a continuation of 105, Fundamentals of Dramatic Writing. It is a more intensive workshop and study of the process of playwriting. It also introduces the study of film and basic screenwriting techniques. In both areas we emphasize dramatic structure, characterization, plot and dialogue. The course is intended to develop skills of analyzing both theatre and film. It requires a considerable independence and initiative in your establishing your own goals for the semester. (Spring)

ENGL 3630 - American Drama I
19th-century melodrama and the emergence of realism; works by O'Neill and other dramatists of the early 20th century. (Fall)

ENGL 3631 - American Drama II
Developments in modern American drama since World War II, including works by Williams, Miller, Albee, Shepard, Rabe, Guare, Mamet, Henley, Wasserstein, Shange, Hwang, Wilson, and others. (Spring)

ENGL 3730 - Love and Longing in Postcolonial Literature and Cinema
This course explores the representation of love, longing, and desire in twentieth century British and postcolonial cultures around the world, with considerable focus on South Asia. We will critically explore the theme of love and longing in contemporary literature, theory, and world cinema post WWII. Theoretical feminist and queer writings on intimacy from North America will be juxtaposed with literature and film from South Asia and beyond. (Spring)

FREN 3560 - Topics in 20th-Century Francophone Literature and Cinema
Analysis of relations between France and its former colonies as manifested in the literature and cinema of France and the Francophone world. Race and gender relations; exile; nationalism; and identity and place as seen through various literary and cinematic responses to the discourses of metropolitan France by its former colonies. Laboratory fee. (Fall)

ENGL 3830 - Transnational Film Studies and LGBTQ Cultures
The interdisciplinary field that has come to be called “queer” studies over the past two decades has always concerned itself with questions of representation: how are, for instance, lesbians and gay men, or transgendered people, represented in film, in novels, in other forms of media? As the field has developed, these questions of representation have increasingly been linked to other, complex questions, involving political economy, globalization, and transnationalism. This film studies course will consider how questions of queer representation intersect with questions of queer globalization(s). From November 9-17, we will travel to Prague, Czech Republic to attend Mezipatra: Queer Film Festival along with students in Professor Kateřina Kolářová’s class. (Fall)

FREN 3300 - Topics in French and Francophone Literatures and Cultures in Translation (When focus is cinema)
Dynamics of French-speaking societies and their cultures studied through literature, art, or film. Topics vary. Readings and lectures in English. The course may be repeated for credit. A laboratory fee may be required.

FREN 3560 - Topics in 20th-Century Francophone Literature and Cinema
Analysis of relations between France and its former colonies as manifested in the literature and cinema of France and the Francophone world. Race and gender relations; exile; nationalism; and identity and place as seen through various literary and cinematic responses to the discourses of metropolitan France by its former colonies. Laboratory fee. (Fall)

FREN 3700 - Topics in the History of French Cinema
French cinema from its inception to the "New Wave." The relationship of filmmaking and audience reception to the evolution of French society and political institutions. The language of cinema as it evolves according to periods and genres and as critics and filmmakers create a theoretical discourse specific to film. Laboratory fee. (Spring)

GER 3181 - History of German Cinema – in English
A detailed historical and cultural survey of German cinema from the first moving picture devices (1895) to the expressionistic classics of the 1920s and the collapse of the Nazi film industry in 1945. All films are subtitled. (Fall or spring)

GER 3187 - German Cinema After 1945
The evolution of German cinema, from postwar examinations of the Nazi period through the social and political developments in the two German states. National and international influences; filmic treatments of the two German pasts since unification. (Fall or spring)

ITAL 3300 - Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (When focus is cinema)
Dynamics of Italian-speaking societies and their cultures studied through literature, art, or film. Topics vary. Readings and lectures in English. The course may be repeated for credit. A laboratory fee may be required.

JAPN/ANTH 3162 - Japanese Culture Through Film
Survey of the Japanese cultural heritage presented through films. Topics include literature, philosophy, art, religion, and social history from prehistorical times to the modern era. Lectures and discussion in English. (Fall and spring)

KOR 3162 - Korean Culture Through Film
The intersection of gender, class, and nation in contemporary society through the lens of Korean film. English subtitles; lectures and discussion in English. (Fall and spring)

PHIL 1062 - Philosophy and Film
Philosophical problems and theories of perception, meaning, personal identity, and moral agency and their illustration in the context of cinema. Cinema and its derivatives (TV, video) as prime routes to experience of the natural and social worlds in an age of communication. Readings in classical and contemporary philosophy and in film theory; screening of a series of films. (Spring)

SLAV 2785 - Introduction to Russian Cinema I
From Russian silents to the introduction of sound and color (1896–1946). The great revolutionary directors—Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Dovzhenko. In English; all films subtitled. (Fall)

SLAV 2786 - Introduction to Russian Cinema II
From post-war to post-perestroika cinema (since 1946): war films, adventure, films about youth. In English; all films subtitled. In English; all films subtitled. (Spring)

SPAN 3300 - Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures in Translation (When focus is cinema)
Dynamics of Hispanic societies and their cultures studied through literature, art, or film. Topics vary. Readings and lectures in English. The course may be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required. (Fall and spring, alternate years)

SPAN 3700 - Topics in the Cinema of the Hispanic World
Film as a language of cultural and historical testimony in Spanish America and Spain. Topics may include the Silent Era, Surrealism, the Mexican Golden Age of the ’40s, the New Cinema of the ’50s, Peronist cinema in Argentina, socialist film in Cuba, and postmodern production in the Hispanic world. May be repeated for credit. (Fall)