Institute for Middle East Studies

Events Archive - Spring 2013


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IERES's Behind the Headlines Series
Central and Eastern Europe Efforts to Democratize MENA— with Kristina Mikulova

In the first decade of the 21st century, the young democracies in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) became known for displays of moral fiber in combating authoritarianism around the globe. When the Arab Awakening swept across North Africa and the Middle East (MENA), they made valuable attempts to extend their support, reaching out to democratizers in Tunisia, Egypt, and elsewhere to share their "transition know-how." In doing so, they inspired heated theoretical debates on the applicability of the lessons from post-communist transitions in the Arab world.

Yet to date, little is known about actual CEE activities on the ground in MENA, the donors' motivations, and the recipients' feedback. Capitalizing on primary sources and open-ended interviews, Dr. Mikulova seeks to fill this empirical gap, and also draw generalizable conclusions about the existing and potential value-added of CEE democracy assistance in MENA.

Dr. Kristina Mikulova is a Transatlantic Policy Fellow in International Relations and Security at SAIS, Johns Hopkins University, and a governance consultant for the Europe and Central Asia region at the World Bank. Her paper, co-authored with Dr Benedetta Berti of the Institute for National Security Studies at Tel Aviv University, is due to be published as part of the Democracy and Rule of Law paper series at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.


Thursday, June 13
4:00 PM
Voesar Conference Room
1957 E St., NW, Suite 412

This event is sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies and the Institute for Middle East Studies.


 

POMEPS Event Series
Democracy's Fourth Wave — A Conversation with Philip Howard and Muzammil Hussain

Dr. Philip Howard is an associate professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. He directs the World Information Access Project (wiaproject.org) and the Project on Information Technology and Political Islam (pitpi.org). He is the author of The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. He teaches courses on research methods, politics online, and international development. Muzammil M. Hussain is a doctoral candidate at the University of Washington's Department of Communication, and comparative international researcher at the Center for Communication and Civic Engagement (CCCE) focusing on information infrastructure and social organization, and digital media and political participation.

Howard and Hussain will discuss their new book Democracy's Fourth Wave: Digital Media and the Arab Spring.

Tuesday, April 30
5:30 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

This event is sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS).


 

The American Islamic Congress presents
"Religious Orthodxy and the Battle for Rationality"— A Panel Discussion

Please join AIC and Project Nur, with support from the John Templeton Foundation, for the third event in a groundbreaking series exploring the intersections and divergences of faith and reason in "Science and Islam." Dialogues, held at college campuses across the country, address issues like creation, evolution and extraterrestrial life. A panel of prominent Muslim scientists, along with students and other audience members, explore Muslim perspectives on science and discusses how Muslim Americans grapple with some of today's scientific advancements

Keynote Speaker
Dr. Pervez Amirali Hoodbhoy
is professor of nuclear and high energy physics, and teaches at Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad. He received his BS, MS, and Ph.D degrees, all from the Massachussetts Institute of Technology. He is a recipient of the Baker Award for Electronics and the Abdus Salam Prize for Mathematics. In 2010, Dr. Hoodbhoy received the Joseph A. Burton Award from the American Physical Society and the Jean Meyer Award from Tufts University. In 2011, he was included in the list of 100 most influential global thinkers by Foreign Policy magazine.
Over a period of 25 years, Dr. Hoodbhoy created and anchored a series of television programs that dissected the problems of Pakistan's education system, and two other series that aimed at bringing scientific concepts to ordinary members of the public. He is the author of "Islam and Science - Religious Orthodoxy and the Battle for Rationality", now in 8 languages. As the head of Mashal Books in Lahore, he leads a major translation effort to produce books in Urdu that promote modern thought, human rights, and emancipation of women. In 2003 he was awarded UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for the popularization of science. Also in 2003, Dr. Hoodbhoy was invited to the Pugwash Council. He is a sponsor of The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and a member of the Permanent Monitoring Panel on Terrorism of the World Federation of Scientists.

Moderator
Dr. Muhammad H. Faghfoory is professor of Islamic Studies at the George Washington University where he teaches courses on Islam, Sufism, Islamic Art and Spirituality, Islamic Philosophy and Theology, Islamic Political thought, and Shi'ite Islam and other related courses.
He received his Master's degrees in history and Middle East studies from the University of Illinois, and a Master's degree and a PhD in political science and Middle East studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has taught at the University of Tehran and has been a visiting scholar at the University of California-Los Angeles, Islamic Manuscripts Specialist at Princeton University, and at the Library of Congress, and adjunct professor of Middle East History at Mary-Washington University in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
Dr. Faghfoory has written, translated, and edited nine books, numerous book chapters, articles, and book reviews. His works have been published by the State University of New York Press, University Press of America, Oxford Encyclopedia of the Muslim World, International Journal of Middle East Studies, the Middle East Journal, and the International Journal of Shi@'i Studies. He has lectured extensively in the United States, Europe, and the Middle East, and participated in interfaith dialogue organized by American media. His most recent work is a long monograph on "War and Peace in Shi'ite Islam," a project sponsored by Peace Research Institute of Norway and will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2011. Currently, he is working on a book on Clergy-State Relations in Iran: 1979--present.

Panelists
Dr. Asad Q. Ahmed is Associate Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies, The University of California, Berkeley. Prior to holding this appointment, he was the Harper Schmidt Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago and a distinguished Mellon Foundation Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Dr. Ahmed received his BA with the highest honors from Yale University in 2000. His undergraduate work focused on western philosophy and literature, in which fields he received distinctions from the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Literature at Yale University.
He received his PhD with distinction from the Department of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University, in 2007. Dr. Ahmed specializes in early Islamic social history and Islamic intellectual history, with a special focus on the rationalist sciences. He is the author of the following books: *The Religious Elite of the Early Islamic Hijaz* (Oxford, 2011), *Avicenna's Deliverance: Logic* (Oxford, 2011), and *The Islamic Scholarly Tradition* (Brill, 2010).
He has also published numerous articles in the fields of Islamic rationalism, including philosophy, logic, and theology, in international journals and collected volumes. Dr. Ahmed currently chairs the Mellon Seminars called "Graeco-Arabic Rationalism in Islamic Transmitted Sciences: The Post-Classical Period" and is the editor-in-chief of the *Oxford Series in Post-Classical Islamic Intellectual History* (OUP). He is also co-editor of the prestigious international journal of Islamic Studies, called *Oriens*, and editor for the Qur'an and Early Islam sections of *The Marginalia Review*. He is the recipient of numerous distinguished fellowships and awards, such as the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Humanities Center, the Stanford Humanities Center, and the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies. He works with twelve research languages, including Arabic, Persian, Greek, Syriac, and Latin.

Dr. Omar Sultan Haque is a psychologist, physician, and philosopher, and is an Instructor and Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University in the laboratory of Steven Pinker, and in the Program in Psychiatry and the Law at Harvard Medical School supervised by Harold Bursztajn. He is a co-Director of the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics, American Unit. His research investigates empirical as well as normative questions at the intersections of psychology, medicine, religion, and philosophy.
His research and training has been supported by a number of awards, grants and fellowships, including from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, Nancy Lurie Marks Foundation, Tylenol Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Pluralism Project, Harvard Mind/Brain/Behavior Interfaculty Initiative, and the Centre for Anthropology and Mind at Oxford University.
Dr. Haque's research and ideas have been covered by and appeared in a number of media venues, including the Atlantic Monthly, BBC, Boston Globe, Businessweek, Forbes, Harvard Magazine, Los Angeles Times, The New Republic, NPR, Scientific American, Washington Post, and Wired Magazine.

Wednesday, April 24
6:00 PM
The City View Room
1957 E St., NW, 7th floor

This event is sponsored by The American Islamic Congress' Project Nur, and the John Templeton Foundation.



MEPF Event Series
Heaven on Earth: A Journey Through Shari'a Law— A Book Discussion featuring Sadakat Kadri

Some fourteen hundred years after the Prophet Muhammad first articulated God's law--the shari'a--its earthly interpreters are still arguing about what it means. In Heaven on Earth: A Journey Through Shari'a Law, legal historian and human rights attorney Sadakat Kadri argues that many people in the West harbor hazy or wrong ideas about Islamic law. Searching for the facts behind the myths, he traces the turbulent journey of Islam's foundation and expansion and shows how the Prophet's teachings evolved gradually into concepts of justice.

Sadakat Kadri is a legal historian and English barrister at the Doughty Street Chambers. In addition to his latest book, he regularly contributes to various publications including The Guardian and the London Review of Books, and is the author of The Trial: A History from Socrates to O.J. Simpson (2005).

Wednesday, April 17
3:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

 

 

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.



IMES Lecture Series
The Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism, 1860-1914
Featuring Dr. Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

The Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalismestablishes the existence of a special radical trajectory spanning four continents and linking Beirut, Cairo, and Alexandria between 1860 and 1914. It shows that radical ideas (more often than not a selective adaptation of socialist and anarchist ideas) were regularly discussed, disseminated, and reworked among intellectuals, workers, dramatists,Egyptians, Ottoman Syrians, ethnic Italians, Greeks, and others in these cities. It argues that migrant networks were central to the making of a globalized world, partly through the dissemination of ideas and practices that challenged the global world order and the logic of global capitalism.

The book challenges nationalist and elite narratives of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern history as well as Eurocentric ideas about global radical movements. It seeks to "deprovincialize" the history of the Eastern Mediterranean by emphasizing its social, cultural and intellectual links with other parts of the world.

Ilham Khuri-Makdisi received her Ph.D. in History/Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University in 2004.  She is currently Associate Professor of Middle East and World History at Northeastern University.  Her Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism, 1860-1914 was published by University of California Press in 2010, and she has authored a number of articles and book chapters on the history of the Left in the Arab Mediterranean region, global migrations, and theater in the late nineteenth century.

Tuesday, April 16
5:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

This event is sponsored by the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant for the Middle East, and the Institute for Middle East Studies.



POMEPS Event Series
Islamists and the State — A Conversation with Stacey Philbrick Yadav

book cover: Islamists and the State

Dr. Stacey Philbrick Yadav is an assistant professor of political science at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, specializing in comparative politics of the Middle East. Her research focuses on the role of Islamist organizations in the transformation of public spheres, concentrating on research in Lebanon, Yemen, Egypt, and Israel.

She will be discussing her upcoming book Islamists and the State.

Thursday, April 11
6:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

*A book signing and reception will follow. Limited copies of the book will be available for GW students.*

This event is sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS).

 



MEPF Event Series
Energy Developments in the Persian Gulf— A Panel Discussion

  • Dr. Bijan Khajehpour, Managing Partner, Atieh International
  • Siamak Namazi, General Manager, Access Consulting Group

    Moderated by
    Ambassador Edward "Skip" Gnehm, Director, Middle East Policy Forum, George Washington University

As Iraq reemerges as a major oil producer after years of domestic turmoil, Iran continues to develop its petroleum sector despite economic sanctions. Focusing on energy sectors in Iran and Iraq, the panelists will discuss the influence of energy developments on regional relations. They will also highlight important trends in regional oil production and consumption.

Dr. Bijan Khajehpour is a managing and founding partner of Atieh International, a Vienna-based management consulting firm, and holds a Ph.D. in Business Administration from the International School of Management in Paris. Siamak Namazi is the general manager of Access Consulting Group, a Dubai-based private regional consultancy, and holds an MBA from the London Business School and an MS in Urban and Regional Planning from Rutgers University.

Wednesday, April 10
6:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.



IMES 6th Annual Conference: Political Economy and the Foundations of Regional Change

Presented by The Institute for Middle East Studies with The Project on Middle East Political Science

This interdisciplinary conference will bring together a diverse group of Middle East scholars from across the U.S. to discuss empirical and theoretical issues related to the contemporary Middle East political economy. Each panelist will present a unique 'think-piece' that outlines how he or she is addressing these issues through their own research agendas — and how the field of regional political economy has changed in the wake of the Arab uprisings.

Wednesday, April 10
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
The City View Room
1957 E St., NW, 7th floor

Panel I - The Politics of Economic Indicators and Official Interpretations: What are we Measuring and What Does it Mean?

featuring

  • Pete Moore, Associate Professor of Political Science, Case Western Reserve University
  • Karen Pfeifer, Professor Emeritus, Smith College
  • Shana Marshall, Research Instructor and Associate Director, Institute for Middle East Studies, George Washington University

Panel II - The Economic Foundations of the Contemporary Distributive State in the Middle East: Understanding New Modes of State Patronage

featuring

  • Toby Jones, Associate Professor of History, Rutgers University
  • Michael Herb, Associate Professor and Director of the Middle East Institute, Georgia State University
  • Mary Ann Tetreault, Una Chapman Cox Distinguished Professor of International Affairs and Political Science, Trinity University

Keynote Luncheon - "The Political Economy of the Modern Middle East: Using the Past to Think About the Future"

featuring Roger Owen, AJ Meyer Professor of Middle East History, Harvard University
*a light lunch will be served*

Panel III - Uprising Economics: The Material Roots of Unrest and the Range of State Responses

  • Omar Dahi, Assistant Professor of Economics, Hampshire College
  • Bassam Haddad, Assistant Professor and Director of the Middle East Studies Program, George Mason University
  • Arang Keshavarzian, Associate Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, New York University

» Download the Conference Agenda

This event is sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies, and the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant for the Middle East.
This event is also supported by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS).




MEPF and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies present
"The Kurdish Perspective: Iraq, Syria, Turkey, and Beyond"— A panel discussion with a delegation from the Kurdistan Regional Government, Iraq

  • H.E. Dr. Fuad Hussein, Chief of Staff to President Barzani
  • H.E. Falah Bakir, Minister, Head of the Department of Foreign Relations
  • H.E. Qubad Talabani, Minister, Head of the Department of Coordination and Follow-up

    Moderated by
    Ambassador Edward "Skip" Gnehm, Director, Middle East Policy Forum, George Washington University
    and
    Pal Arne Davidsen, Ambassador Stuart Fellow at IERES

On April 9, 2003, the statue of Iraqi president Saddam Hussein in Baghdad's Firdos Square was toppled. Ten years after Iraq's liberation not all is well in the country, although the Kurdistan Region has indeed been liberated from Saddam's rule and it is thriving more than ever. Senior members of the Kurdistan Regional Government will discuss the current political stalemate in Iraq, including natural resources disputes and security confrontations in the Disputed Internal Boundaries. They will also provide their perspective on other regional developments, not least the situation in Syria, as well as prospects for conflict resolution in Turkey.

Monday, April 8
11:00 AM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.



POMEPS Event Series
Muslim Nationalists and the New Turks — A Conversation with Jenny White

Dr. Jenny White is an associate professor and director of undergraduate studies in the anthropology department at Boston University. She is the former president of the Turkish Studies Association and of the American Anthropological Association Middle East Section, and sits on the board of the Institute of Turkish Studies. She is the author of Islamist Mobilization in Turkey: A Study in Vernacular Politics (2002, winner of the 2003 Douglass Prize for best book in Europeanist anthropology) and Money Makes Us Relatives: Women's Labor in Urban Turkey (second edition, London: Routledge, 2004). She also has written three historical novels set in 19th century Istanbul, The Sultan's Seal (2006), The Abyssinian Proof (2008), and The Winter Thief (2010).

Dr. White will be discussing her most recent book Muslim Nationalists and the New Turks.

Wednesday, April 3
6:30 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

*A book signing and reception will follow. Limited copies of the book will be available for GW students.*

This event is sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS).



MEPF Event Series
Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance — A Book Launch featuring Dr. Dina Khoury

Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance traces the political, social, and cultural processes of the normalization of war during the last two decades of Ba'thist rule. Beginning with the Iran-Iraq War and continuing through the First Gulf War and sanctions, Dr. Dina Khoury probes the far-reaching ramifications of constant war on the Iraqi people's politics, cultural imagination, and daily lives. She argues that war was a form of everyday bureaucratic governance, and examines the Iraqi government's policies of creating consent, managing resistance and religious diversity, and shaping public culture.

Dr. Dina Khoury is associate professor of history and international affairs at The George Washington University. Since 2005, she has been writing on the contemporary history of Iraq, particularly violence, sectarian politics, and war and memory. She is author of State and Provincial Society in the Ottoman Empire (Cambridge, 1997).

Click HERE for an interview with the author and book excerpts.

Monday, April 1
6:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

*A limited number of books will be available for GW students*

 

 

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.



MEPF Event Series
Maliki's Next Moves — A Panel Discussion

  • Dr. Adeed Dawisha, Professor of Political Science, Miami University of Ohio
  • Dr. Harith al-Qarawee, Former Political Advisor, Embassy of Iraq

    Moderated by
    Ambassador Edward "Skip" Gnehm, Director, Middle East Policy Forum, George Washington University

Iraq is scheduled to hold provincial assembly elections in April 2013 and national parliamentary elections one year later. In late December, following arrests of his major Sunni Arab rival's bodyguards, Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki raised the possibility of advancing the 2014 parliamentary election to April 2013 and running for a third term. The parliament then passed a two-term limitation on the prime minister and other senior positions.

Dr. Adeed Dawisha, an Iraqi scholar and professor of political science at Miami University of Ohio, and Dr. Harith al-Qarawee, author of Imagining the Nation: Nationalism, Sectarianism, and Socio-Political Conflict in Iraq and former political adviser on political and media affairs to the Iraqi Ambassador in Washington, will assess the current political environment in Baghdad and Maliki's strategic vision — or lack of one — for Iraq.

Thursday, March 28
6:30 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.



POMEPS Event Series
After the Sheikhs: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies — A Conversation with Christopher Davidson

Dr. Christopher Davidson is a reader in Middle East Politics in the School of Government and International Affairs at Durham University, a former visiting associate professor at Kyoto University, and a former assistant professor at Zayed University in the United Arab Emirates. He is the author of several books on the politics and international affairs of the Gulf states, including Abu Dhabi: Oil and Beyond, Dubai: The Vulnerability of Success, and The Persian Gulf and Pacific Asia: From Indifference to Interdependence.

Dr. Davidson will be discussing his most recent book After the Sheikhs: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies.

Wednesday, March 20
5:30 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

*A book signing and wine reception will follow. Limited copies of the book will be available for GW students.*

This event is sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS).



IMES Lecture Series and the Middle East Policy Forum
Piety and Pleasure: Youth Negotiations of Moral Authority in South Beirut
Featuring Dr. Lara Deeb

In this lecture, Dr. Deeb will discuss the ways in which young Shi'i Muslims who take their faith seriously negotiate ideas and practices related to leisure in South Beirut — specifically activities related to cafe-going and to dating. These negotiations take place in a context where there are multiple moral authorities and where particular forms of piety have come to be taken for granted.

Lara Deeb is Associate Professor and Chair of Anthropology at Scripps College. She is the author of An Enchanted Modern: Gender and Public Piety in Shi'i Lebanon (2006) and co-author with Mona Harb of Leisure Islam: Negotiating Geography and Morality in Shi'i South Beirut (forthcoming 2013), as well as articles on Muslim women's participation in the public sphere, morality and leisure, transnational feminism, and Hizbullah in Lebanon.

Tuesday, March 19
5:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.
This event is sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies, and the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant for the Middle East.



IMES Lecture Series
New Babylonians: A History of Jews in Modern Iraq
Featuring Dr. Orit Bashkin

Although Iraqi Jews saw themselves as Iraqi patriots, their community--which had existed in Iraq for more than 2,500 years--was displaced following the establishment of the state of Israel. New Babylonians chronicles the lives of these Jews, their urban Arab culture, and their hopes for a democratic nation-state. It studies their ideas about Judaism, Islam, secularism, modernity, and reform, focusing on Iraqi Jews who internalized narratives of Arab and Iraqi nationalisms and on those who turned to communism in the 1940s.

As the book reveals, the ultimate displacement of this community was not the result of a perpetual persecution on the part of their Iraqi compatriots, but rather the outcome of misguided state policies during the late 1940s and early 1950s. Sadly, from a dominant mood of coexistence, friendship, and partnership, the impossibility of Arab-Jewish coexistence became the prevailing narrative in the region--and the dominant narrative we have come to know today.

Dr. Orit Bashkin is Associate Professor of Modern Middle East History at the University of Chicago. She is the author of The Other Iraq: Pluralism and Culture in Hashemite Iraq (Stanford, 2008).

Tuesday, March 5
5:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

This event is sponsored by the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant for the Middle East, and the History Department.



The Middle East Policy Forum presents:
The 2013 Annual Kuwait Chair Lecture - "U.S. Military Intervention in Iraq: Cost and Consequences"
Featuring Ambassador Edward W. "Skip" Gnehm, Jr. - Kuwait Professor of Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Affairs, GWU s

The final convoy of U.S. combat forces withdrew from Iraq in December 2011, but the U.S. military intervention produced transformational effects that continue to reverberate in Iraq and throughout the region. On the 10 year anniversary of the U.S. intervention, Ambassador Gnehm will reflect on the costs and consequences of that action on the U.S., Iraq, specifically, and the Middle East, more broadly

Thursday, February 28
6:30 PM
Harry Harding Auditorium (room 213)
1957 E St., NW, 2nd floor

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.



IMES Lecture Series
Tragic Moderns: Towards a Non-Teleological Reading of Feminist Politics in Contemporary Morocco
Featuring Dr. Nadia Guessous

When Moroccan leftist feminists narrate their life stories and talk about formative influences in their lives, many recall the influence of a "traditional" and pious father figure who was just and egalitarian, and who inspired their commitment to and struggle for gender equality. If this positive invocation of an enabling tradition is noteworthy for how consistently it recurs in the life stories of a cross-section of Moroccan leftist feminists, it is equally notable for how dramatically it disappears and is displaced by a notion of tradition as obstacle to women's emancipation and progress.

In her new paper, Dr. Guessous juxtaposes invocations of the "traditional, pious but egalitarian" father figure with that of "the failed and disappointing leftist husband who claims to be modern but is in fact traditional" in order to complicate our understanding of the relationship between feminism and tradition and to think about the imperatives of modern progressive politics. She argues that the tragedy of Moroccan leftist feminist subjectivity lies in the fact that it is predicated on locating the possibility of women's progress and feminist politics in the repudiation of the very tradition that makes it possible in the first place; and that this constitutive disavowal comes in the way of a more generous ethos of intergenerational and intersubjective engagement.

Dr. Nadia Guessous is a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Research on Women and the Department of Women's and Gender Studies at Rutgers. She received her PhD in anthropology from Columbia University in 2011.  Her research interests include gender and feminism; the anthropology of politics; religion and secularism; modern subjectivity; affect and viscerality; postcolonial feminist theory; the Middle East, North Africa, and Islam.  She has published articles and book reviews in Confluences Mediterranee, The Journal of Middle East Women's Studies, and Jadaliyya; and has forthcoming articles in The Review of Middle East Studies and Arab Studies Journal. She is also the author of a study on women and political violence during the repressive years of lead in Morocco, which was commissioned by the Moroccan Truth Commission and published by the Consultative Council on Human Rights.

Monday, February 25
5:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

This event is sponsored by the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant for the Middle East, the Department of Religion, and the Women's Studies Program.



IMES Lecture Series
Arabs and Muslims in the Media after 9/11: Patriotic Arab Americans, Oppressed Muslim Women and Sympathetic Feelings
Featuring Dr. Evelyn Alsultany

After 9/11 there was an increase in sympathetic portrayals of Arabs and Muslims on U.S. television. If a TV drama represented an Arab or Muslim as a terrorist, then the storyline usually included a "positive" representation of an Arab or Muslim to offset the negative depiction. Given that the US government passed domestic and foreign policies that compromised the civil and human rights of Arabs and Muslims, and given that demonizing the enemy during times of war has been commonplace, why would such sympathetic portrayals appear at all?

This talk will review various forms of positive imagery of Arabs and Muslims in TV dramas and news reporting since 9/11 and explain why the production and circulation of "positive" representations of the "enemy" is essential to depicting the United States as a benevolent superpower, especially amidst declarations of war and propagation of racist policies.

Dr. Evelyn Alsultany is an Associate Professor in the Program in American Culture at the University of Michigan. She is the author of Arabs and Muslims in the Media: Race and Representation after 9/11 (New York University Press, 2012). She is co-editor (with Rabab Abdulhadi and Nadine Naber) of Arab and Arab American Feminisms: Gender, Violence, and Belonging (Syracuse University Press, 2011), winner of this year's Arab American National Museum's Evelyn Shakir Book Award. She is also co-editor (with Ella Shohat) of Between the Middle East and the Americas: The Cultural Politics of Diaspora (University of Michigan Press, forthcoming 2012). She is guest curator of the Arab American National Museum's online exhibit, Reclaiming Identity: Dismantling Arab Stereotypes (www.arabstereotypes.org).


Thursday, February 21
5:00 PM
Room 113
1957 E St., NW, first floor

This event is sponsored by the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant for the Middle East, and the Department of American Studies at George Washington University.



The Institute for Middle East Studies presents:
"The Light In Her Eyes"
A Special Documentary Film Screening

Tuesday, February 12
7:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

This event is supported by the Institute for Middle East Studies and the American Islamic Congress' Project Nur.



POMEPS Event Series
Elections and Politics in North Africa
A Panel Discussion

Ellen Lust, Associate Professor of Political Science, Yale University
Lindsay Benstead, Professor of Political Science, Portland State University
Matthew Buehler, PhD Candidate, University of Texas - Austin

Moderated by Dr. Marc Lynch, George Washington University

Three leading political scientists will discuss elections in Tunisia, Morocco, and Egypt.

Monday, February 11
12:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

This event is sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS).



MEPF Event Series
Libya: A State in Search of Itself
A Panel Discussion featuring

Dr. Mary-Jane Deeb, Chief of African and Middle Eastern Division, Library of Congress
Dr. Karim Mezran, Senior Fellow, Rafiq Hariri Center for the Middle East, Atlantic Council

Moderated by Ambassador Edward "Skip" Gnehm, Director, Middle East Policy Forum, George Washington University

Despite successful parliamentary elections in July 2012, Libya faces numerous obstacles to state development. Rife with internal divisions and regional tensions, Libya struggles to achieve national cohesion and advance the political process. Moreover, the country's fractious and divisive political environment inhibits institution building and complicates efforts to restore internal security. In light of Libya's institutional and security challenges, the panelists will discuss current developments and prospects for Libya's political future.

Thursday, January 24
6:30 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.



POMEPS Event Series
Elections in Israel
A Panel Discussion

Yoram Peri, Abraham S. and Jack Kay Chair in Israel Studies, University of Maryland
Ilan Peleg, Charles A. Dana Professor of Government & Law, Lafayette College
Gershon Shafir, Professor of Sociology, University of California, San Diego
Jonathan Rynhold, Schusterman Visiting Professor in Israel Studies, George Washington University

Moderated by Dr. Marc Lynch, George Washington University

Three leading political scientists will discuss the outcomes and implications of Israel's January 2013 parliamentary elections.

Thursday, January 24
12:00 PM
Lindner Commons
1957 E St., NW, 6th floor

This event is sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS).




 




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