Institute for Middle East Studies

Events Archive – Fall 2008


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December 1, 2008: IMES Book Launch
Israeli Culture Between the Two Intifadas: A Brief Romance
by: Yaron Peleg, Associate Professor of Hebrew, GW

Discussants:

  • Eran Kaplan, Lecturer in Judaic Studies and History, Princeton University
  • Shira Robinson, Assistant Professor of History and International Affairs, George Washington University

Reception to follow the discussion.

Over the past two decades, profound changes in Israel opened its society to powerful outside forces and the dominance of global capitalism. As a result, the centrality of Zionism as an organizing ideology waned, prompting expressions of anxiety in Israel about the coming of a post-Zionist age. The fears about the end of Zionism were quelled, however, by the Palestinian uprising in 2000, which spurred at least a partial return to more traditional perceptions of homeland. Looking at Israeli literature of the late twentieth century, Yaron Peleg shows how a young, urban class of Israelis felt alienated from the Zionist values of their forebears, and how they adopted a form of escapist romanticism as a defiant response that replaced traditional nationalism.

One of the first books in English to identify the end of the post-Zionist era through inspired readings of Hebrew literature and popular media, Israeli Culture between the Two Intifadas examines Israel's ambivalent relationship with Jewish nationalism at the end of the twentieth century.

Monday, December 1, 2008
3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Room 512B
1957 E Street NW


November 24, 2008: GW Diaspora Seminar Series:

From al Nakbah to Ghurbah : the Palestinian diaspora and the Peace Process

Guest speaker: Victoria Mason, Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, Lancaster University (UK)

Monday, November 24, 2008
12:30p.m. - 2:00p.m.
5th Floor Commons (Room 512B)
1957 E Street, NW

This event is co-sponsored by GW-CIBER and the Institute for Middle East Studies


November 20, 2008: Middle East Policy Forum

Jerusalem Women Speak: Hope for Peace

  • Leila Shelimar Mosenson
  • Taghreed El Khodary
  • Lucy Talgieh

This event will feature women from three different faiths who will talk about their hopes for peace in the region from their own religious and cultural perspectives.

Thursday, November 20, 2008
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW


November 11, 2008: IMES Special Event

On Theater and Politics: A lecture by Israeli playwright Motti Lerner

Veteran Israeli playwright, Motti Lerner, has written numerous successful plays that were inspired by history and contemporary politics, among them plays about Zionist pioneers, West Bank settlers and most recently about the Iranian nuclear threat. Lerner will speak about the challenges of art, ethics, and politics in our today.

Tuesday, November 11, 2008
6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Suite 512B
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW


November 11, 2008: IMES Brownbag Lecture Series

The Cultural War in Israel: 13 Years After the Assassination of Prime Minister Rabin

Yoram Peri is the Head of The Chaim Herzog Institute for Media, Politics and Society, and professor of Political Sociology and Communication in the Department of Communication at Tel Aviv University. A former political advisor to the late Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, and former Editor-in-chief of the Israeli daily, Davar, he has published extensively on Israeli society, media and politics. Among his publications are Brothers at War: The Assassination of Yitzhak Rabin and the Cultural War in Israel (in Hebrew) and Between Battles and Ballots: Israel Military in Politics. His latest book, Generals in the Cabinet Room: How the Military Shapes Israeli Policy, was published in May 2006 by the United States Institute of Peace.

Tuesday, November 11, 2008
1:00p.m. - 2:00p.m.
Suite 512 Conference Room
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW


November 10, 2008: IMES Book Launch

Governing Gaza: Bureaucracy, Authority, and the Work of Rule, 1917-1967
by: Ilana Feldman, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs, GW

Discussants:

  • Ted Swedenburg , Professor of Anthropology, University of Arkansas
  • Rochelle Davis, Assistant Professor of Arab Culture and Society, Georgetown University

Reception to follow the discussion.

Drawing on archival research in Gaza, Jerusalem, and London, as well as two years of ethnographic research with retired civil servants in Gaza, Feldman identifies two distinct, and in some ways contradictory, governing practices. She illuminates mechanisms of "reiterative authority" derived from the minutiae of daily bureaucratic practice: the repetitions of filing procedures, the accumulation of documents, and the habits of civil servants. Looking at the provision of services, she highlights the practice of "tactical government," a deliberately restricted mode of rule that makes limited claims about governmental capacity, shifts in response to crisis, and works without long-term planning. This practice made it possible for government to proceed without claiming legitimacy: by holding the question of legitimacy in abeyance. Feldman shows that Gaza's governments were able to manage in, though not to control, the difficult conditions in Gaza by deploying both the regularity of everyday bureaucracy and the exceptionality of tactical practice.

Monday, November 10, 2008
2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Room 512B
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW


October 30, 2008: Welling Professor Lecture

Middle East Challenges Facing the Next Administration

William Quandt, Edward R. Stettinius Professor of Politics, UVA and Welling Visiting Professor, GW

How will an Obama or McCain administration deal with the big challenges in the Middle East, from Iran to Iraq; Israel-Palestine; the "democracy agenda"; terrorism? GW Welling Visiting Professor and noted expert on the Middle East William Quandt will argue that the single biggest issue will be how best to deal with Iran.

Thursday, October 30
6:30pm - 7:45pm
Lindner Family Commons, Suite 602
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E St., NW


October 22 , 2008:IMES-IERES Special Event

King Hussein of Jordan: A Political Life

Nigel Ashton , Senior Lecturer in International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science

His book, King Hussein of Jordan, draws on unprecedented and remarkable access to the Royal Hashemite archives in Amman. It sheds new light on key issues, including King Hussein's role in the Arab-Israeli wars, the peace process, the Iran-Iraq war and the Gulf crisis.

Wendesday, October 22, 2008
12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW


October 21 , 2008: IMES Brownbag Lecture Series

Is Egypt on the Brink? Stability & Instability at the End of the Hosni Mubarak Era

Steven A. Cook, Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations & IMES Visiting Scholar

Steven Cook is Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of Ruling But Not Governing: The Military and Political Development in Egypt, Algeria, and Turkey and has written extensively on the politics of the Arab world, US-Middle East policy, civil-military relations in the Middle East, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and civil-military relations in the Middle East. He previously directed the CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force on U.S. policy toward reform in the Arab world, and served as a research fellow at both the Brookings Institution and the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Cook is currently writing a book on the future of U.S.-Egyptian relations.

Tuesday, October 21, 2008
1:00 p.m. -2:00 p.m.
Suite 512 Conference Room
1957 E Street NW


October 14, 2008: Middle East Policy Forum

The Future of World Energy Markets: The United States and the Middle East

  • Richard Sawaya , Executive Director of U.S. - Venezuela Business Council
  • Frank Verrastro , Director and Senior Fellow, Energy and National Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies
  • Jon Alterman , Director and Senior Fellow, Middle East Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Tuesday, October 14, 2008
7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, Suite 602
1957 E Street NW


October 3, 2008: Security Policy Forum

Disarming Libya: Background to an Agreement

The Honorable Robert G. Joseph, Former Undersecretary for Arms Control and International Security, US Department of State

Friday, October 3, 2008
4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

This event is co-sponsored by IMES


September 30, 2008: IMES-IGCPD Panel Discussion

Public Diplomacy and the War of Ideas: Agendas for the Next Administration

This event is co-sponsored by IMES and The Institute for Global Communications and Public Diplomacy (IGCPD) with support from the Walter Roberts Endowment

  • Hady Amr, Director, Brookings Doha Center and Fellow, Saban Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings, and co-author (with Peter Singer) of Engaging the Muslim World: A Communication Strategy to Win the War of Ideas (Brookings, April 2007).
  • Michael Doran, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Support to Public Diplomacy, U.S. Department of Defense.
  • Kristin Lord, Fellow, Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World at Brookings, and author of the forthcoming Voices of America: U.S. Public Diplomacy for the 21st Century.
  • Marc Lynch, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW; co-director of Institute for Global Communications and Public Diplomacy and author of Voices of the New Arab Public.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Elliott Room (Room 310)
The Cloyd Heck Marvin Center
800 21st Street NW


September 25, 2008: Middle East Policy Forum

John D. Negroponte, Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of State

Secretary Negroponte will speak on Iraq and the United States' ongoing involvement in the region. Negroponte will draw on his years of experiences as a career Foreign Service Officer, the Deputy Secretary of State, and a former United States Ambassador to Iraq, to provide a unique perspective on the situation in Iraq and U.S policies.

Thursday, September 25, 2008
6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Harry Harding Auditorium Room, 213
1957 E Street NW


September 23, 2008: Security Policy Forum

The Middle East: For the Next Administration

The Arab-Israeli Conflict:
Aaron Miller, Public Policy Scholar, Woodrow Wilson Center

Political and Social Forces:
Marina Ottaway, Director, Middle East Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Iran:
Ray Takeyh, Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations

Moderator:
Marc Lynch, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Tuesday, September 23, 2008
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW


September 22, 2008: Future of Democracy Series Special Event

A Time of Transition: U.S. Impact on Reform in a Changing Middle East

This event is co-sponsored by the Project on Middle East Democracy (POMED) and IMES, and is part of the Elliott School's "Future of Democracy" event series

  • Saad Eddin Ibrahim, Founder, Ibn Khaldun Center for Development Studies, Cairo
  • Marc Lynch, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW
  • Moderator: Andrew Albertson, Executive Director, Project on Middle East Democracy

As Washington officials debate the future of U.S. policy in the Middle East, one of the principal issues with which they must grapple is change. Dynamics of reform in particular are changing. Youth are increasingly disengaged from traditional political parties, gravitating instead towards independent new organizations mobilized around particular issues or grievances. Islamists' political calculations have changed after observing very divergent experiences and reactions in Turkey, Egypt, Algeria, and the West Bank & Gaza. Blogging and social networking websites like Facebook play an increasingly important role in political mobilization and protest. And while rising oil prices provide additional flexibility to oil producers, inflation threatens the standard of living in poorer states.

Governments, on the other hand, have refined their strategies of managed political reform. In some countries, emergency laws continue to stifle dissent; in others, such laws have been replaced with functionally similar "anti-terrorismz" laws. Elections are carefully controlled, either through sweeping changes in electoral systems or targeted election-day intervention in particular constituencies. Journalists, bloggers, and independent political voices are targets of arrest or intimidation.

How are dynamics of reform in the Middle East changing, and what are the main drivers of that change? How have the last seven years shaped Middle Easterners' attitudes to American involvement in the region, to the word "democracy," and to democratic reform itself? What opportunities and challenges do these changes create for Middle Easterners dedicated to political reform? Following a time of transition in America's own domestic politics, how should the U.S. approach the region? Can the next administration play a positive role in supporting democratic reform in the Middle East, and if so, how?

Monday, September 22, 2008
2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Elliott Room (Room 310)
The Cloyd Heck Marvin Center
800 21st Street NW


September 18, 2008: Middle East Policy Forum

From Friendship to Strategic Partnership: The U.S.-Kuwaiti Relationship

His Highness Shaikh Nasser Al-Mohammed Al-Ahmed Al-Jaber Al-Sabah of Kuwait, Prime Minister of the State of Kuwait

Thursday, September 18, 2008
3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW


September 16, 2008: IMES Brownbag Lecture Series

Islamic 'Life-Makers' and Faith-based Development

Mona Atia, Assistant Professor of Geography and International Affairs

Professor Atia's research lies at the intersection of civil society, geopolitics and financial networks in the contemporary Middle East. Using ethnographic methods, she explores how a transnational Islamic revival, growing Islamic banking and finance industry, and intensified security measures have shifted Islamic charitable practices away from direct handouts and towards faith-based development projects.

Her publications include "In Whose Interest? Financial Surveillance and the Circuits of Exception in the War on Terror" published in 2007 in Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 25(3), and a forthcoming chapter on "The Arab Republic of Egypt" in From Charity to Change: Trends in Arab Philanthropy, eds. Barbara Ibrahim and Dina Sherif, American University in Cairo Press. In 2008, her dissertation "Building a House in Heaven: Islamic Charity in Neoliberal Egypt" was awarded the University of Washington Distinguished Dissertation Award.

Tuesday, September 16, 2008
1:00 p.m. -2:00 p.m.
Suite 501/502 Conference Room
1957 E St., NW

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Upcoming Events

POMEPS Book Launch
"The Wages of Oil: Parliaments and Economic Development in Kuwait and the UAE"
With Dr. Michael Herb
Monday, December 1st, 2014
12:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons (Room 602), Elliott School of International Affairs
» RSVP here

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