Squires

Dr. Gregory Squires

squires@gwu.edu

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GWIPP Research: Gregory Squires

This page features research funded through GWIPP and performed by Gregory Squires.


Title:  Cybersegregation:  Is Neil a More Desirable Tenant than Tyrone or Jorge?

Funding:  National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (Through the University at Albany, State University of New York)

Researchers:  Samantha Friedman and Gregory D. Squires

Start Date:  September 2008

Status: Completed 

Category: Social Policy

Summary: Racial and ethnic minorities encounter unlawful discrimination approximately one out of every five times they inquire about renting a home.  Such practices deny the targeted victims access to decent schools, safe streets, good jobs and many other public and private amenities which has direct impacts on their health. We propose to use the audit methodology whereby equally qualified applicants, one with a distinctively black sounding name, one with a Hispanic name, and the other a white name, respond via e-mail to a random sample of ads placed by a major electronic listing service in two major metropolitan areas, Boston, MA and Dallas, TX, to see if the name affects services provided, a virtually untested domain of the housing market.

Product:  

Cybersegregation in Dallas and Boston: Is Neil a More Desirable Tenant Than Tyrone or Jorge?
http://paa2010.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=101314
Samantha Friedman/University at Albany--State University of New York (SUNY); Gregory Squires/George Washington University; Chris Galvan/University at Albany, State University of New York (SUNY). aper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Dallas, TX, April 17, 2010.


Title The Katrina Project
Funding Open Society Institute of the Soros Foundation
Start Date August 2006 Category Social Policy
Status Completed Link Click here for the Katrina Flyer
Summary

This project consisted of a series of public forums at which contributors to the book, "There is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster:  Race, Class, and Hurricane Katrina," edited by Chester Hartman and Gregory D. Squires, presented an overview of the research reported in that volume.  The basic finding of this research is that the human costs of Katrina and the particularly heavy costs paid by low-income and minority residents were not principally the result of natural forces but rather reflected a range of social and political forces. The first forum was a plenary session at an October 19-21, 2006 conference in New Orleans entitled "Race, Place, and the Environment After Katrina:  Looking Back to Look Forward." sponsored by several organizations including Clark Atlanta University, Lawyers for Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, and the Fannie Mae Foundation. The second forum, "Hurricane Katrina - Participatory Approaches to Rebuilding Communities, was held on Capitol Hill on May 7, 2007 and was hosted by Rep. Charlie Melancon (LA) and co-hosted by Sen. Mary Landrieu (LA), Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton (DC) and Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee (TX). 

Subsequent to the planning of these two forums the Open Society Institute invited us to organize a third forum, "Katrina Was Not a Natural Disaster:  What Went Wrong in the Gulf Coast?" held at their office in New York City on May 4, 2007.


Title: Does the Community Reinvestment Act Encourage Integration of Urban Communities? Mortgage Lending, Homeownership and Black Wealth Accumulation in Metropolitan America
Researcher(s): Samantha Friedman (Dept. of Sociology, GWU) & Gregory D. Squires (Dept. of Sociology, GWU)
Funding: The Ford Foundation
Start Date:
Status: Completed

Summary:
This paper, which has been revised and resubmitted to Social Problems, examines the extent to which the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) has helped racial minorities purchase homes in predominantly white neighborhoods from which they have traditionally been excluded. Using 2000 Home Mortgage Disclosure Act reports (HMDA) and 2000 decennial census data, we find that in metropolitan areas where a relatively high proportion of loans are made by institutions covered by the CRA, blacks and Latinos are more likely to purchase homes in predominantly white neighborhoods than in areas where relatively fewer loans are made by such lenders. This finding holds after controlling for a range of socioeconomic characteristics.

Products:

Working Paper 014 - Does the Community Reinvestment Act Help Minorities Access Traditionally Inaccessible Neighborhoods?, Samantha Friedman and Gregory D. Squires, July 2004.

Friedman, Samantha and Squires, Gregory, "Does the Community Reinvestment Act Help Minorities Access Traditionally Inaccessible Neighoborhoods?" Social Problems, May 2005, Vol. 52, Issue 2, pp. 209–231.


Title Organizing Access to Capital: Advocacy and the Democratization of Financial Institutions
Funding The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
Start Date October 2001 Category Social Policy
Status Completed Link  
Summary

This grant supported the production of an edited book, Organizing Access to Capital: Advocacy and the Democratization of Financial Institutions, published by Temple University Press and two public forums to examine the role of community organizing and related advocacy efforts to increase mortgage and small business lending in distressed urban communities. One forum, sponsored by Rep. Jan Schakowsky (Dem-IL) was held on Capitol Hill and the other was held in Chicago as part of the 30th Anniversary Celebration of the Woodstock Institute, a community reinvestment research organization.


Title Urban Sprawl: Causes, Consequences and Policy Responses
Funding The Annie E. Casey Foundation
Start Date   Category Land Policy
Status Completed Link  
Summary

This grant funded the production of an edited book, Urban Sprawl: Causes, Consequences and Policy Responses published by the Urban Institute Press.