David Brunori
David Brunori


Director, SLFP

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SLFP Research: State and Local Fiscal Policy


Title: Understanding New Jersey's State and Local Tax System

Funding: NEA

Researcher(s): Mike Bell, David Brunori

Start Date: June 2009

Status: Current

Category: State and Local Fiscal Policy

Summary: This project is a study of the New Jersey state and local taxation system. The study will be made up of two segments. The first segment will describe what are generally thought to be the components of an ideal state and local tax structure, examining various models used to describe the ideal mix of taxes and non-tax revenue. The study will review an extensive body of literature to describe the optimal structure of particular taxes and present what is generally thought to be the best way to structure 1) individual income taxes, 2) corporate income taxes, 3) sales taxes, and 4) property taxes. New Jersey’s tax system will be compared with these widely accepted notions of sound tax policy. The second segment of the study will examine particular aspects of the New Jersey tax system, including relative reliance on different types of taxes and non-tax revenue, relative tax levels, the mix of business and household taxes, as well as how New Jersey compares with states in the surrounding area with respect to tax rates.


Title: State and Local Fiscal Systems Face the Future

Funding: National Association of Realtors

Researcher(s): Hal Wolman, David Brunori, Michael Bell, Pat Atkins, Joe Cordes, and Bing Yuan

Start Date: July 2005

Status: Completed

Category: State and Local Fiscal Policy

Summary: The project will examine recent trends in state and local revenues and expenditures and the current condition of state and local finances. In particular, it will assess the likely impact of foreseeable or potential future economic, social, political and technological changes on state and local revenues and expenditures.

Product:

Working Paper 025 - State and Local Fiscal Trends and Future Threats, David Brunori, Michael E. Bell, Hal Wolman, Patricia Atkins, Joseph J. Cordes, and Bing Yuan, 2005.


Title: Fiscal Disparities among Local Governments in Metropolitan Areas: Their Extent and Causes

Funding: US Department of Housing and Urban Development

Researcher(s): Hal Wolman, Pat Atkins, Michael Bell, Joe Cordes, and Leah Curran

Start Date: August 2004

Status: Completed

Category: State and Local Fiscal Policy

Summary: The project explores the extent to which fiscal disparities exist among local jurisdictions within different kinds of metropolitan areas and why these disparities exist. We are particularly interested in the extent of fiscal disparities among suburban jurisdictions as well as between suburban jurisdictions and central cities. We calculate disparities among local governments in a small, regionally representative set of metropolitan areas. We also explore the characteristics of metropolitan areas that are associated with greater fiscal disparities. Finally, we will discuss the policy implications of these findings

Product:

Working Paper 019 - Intrametropolitan Area Revenue Raising Disparities and Equities, Patricia Atkins, Leah Curran, Michael Bell, Harold Wolman, and Joseph Cordes, 2005.


Title: State and Local Infrastructure Financing

Funding: National Center for Real Estate Research, National Association of Realtors

Researchers: Hal Wolman, Michael Bell, David Brunori, Royce Hanson, Chanyong Choi, Lori Metcalf, and Bing Yuan

Start Date: August 2004

Status: Completed

Category: State and Local Fiscal Policy

Summary: The report consists of four parts: The first part presents data on aggregate state and local infrastructure spending for the nation and for the fifty states individually. We define infrastructure to include highways (including streets and bridges), mass transit, air transportation, water transportation, water supply and sewerage. We collect and report spending trends for each category of infrastructure, including total spending by category and capital spending by category for the most recent year available (2002). The second part examines recent trends in federal intergovernmental assistance to state and local governments for infrastructure purposes. The third part is a literature review in order to develop a general understanding of the various financing mechanism used by state and local governments to finance infrastructure spending. The concluding part is an extensive literature review of the mechanisms available to state and local governments to undertake prioritization of infrastructure needs.

Product:

Working Paper 028 - State and Local Infrastructure Financing, Mike Bell, David Brunori, Royce Hanson, Chanyong Choi, Lori Metcalf, and Bing Yuan, November 2005