My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WALTHAM, Mass.—During my recent visit to San Francisco, Gov. Brown met with a number of other Governors and a representative of the Defense Department on the question of shelters. I was glad to find that some effort was really being made to look into this whole question by the government and to consider it a part of national defense. I personally do not think that the question of shelters should be left to become a subject of commercial competition between firms or of an individual's ability to pay. The whole situation is one that should be dealt with by national, state and local cooperation, and I hope there will be no more individual undertakings.

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Last Friday the United States, through Ambassador Stevenson, stated its position on admitting Communist China to the U.N. I was hopeful that the discussion of U.N. membership for Communist China would not come up until a study had been made of the entire situation, not only of Communist China but of Formosa and the government of Formosa. There seems to be no question that a great many nations doubt whether the China originally admitted to the U.N. is at present actually represented by the Formosan delegation. This involves such a number of complicated situations that it seems to me to require a real study over a period of months. To have it settled by heated and, of necessity, emotional debate would seem to me to bring in the long run unsatisfactory results.

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I would like to call your attention to the celebration undertaken this year by the Nansen Centennial Committee of the U.S. Committee for Refugees. Nansen's work has been discussed and commemorated all over this country. The character of this man, I think, is one that every child in our schools should study and know. For this purpose the committee has distributed teaching kits that include publications relating to the centennial which could be used in schools. Also available is a film on Nansen's life and work which was shown at the Viking Club in Washington, D.C. and at the American Scandinavian Foundation in New York City.

To acquaint people with the work accomplished by great and unselfish men is, I believe, an important part of keeping history alive and giving inspiration to each new generation. Hence I welcome occasions such as the Nansen Centennial to inspire the people of today to emulate a great man of the past.

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Tonight (Monday) at 9:00 p.m. in New York City there will be a dinner and a closed circuit TV of the Floyd Patterson-McNeeley world heavyweight championship fight. Floyd Patterson is a graduate of Wiltwyck School and he has continued to be an inspiration to all the boys who are pupils there. These boys come by assignment of the city's courts, and many of them are from Harlem. They need inspiration, and to have one of their own make good is a tremendous one.

Floyd Patterson made the suggestion of this closed circuit TV and dinner, and tickets may be obtained at the Four Seasons for $65 each, of which $50 is tax deductible as a contribution to Wiltwyck School. At this school many New York City boys are striving to learn how they can succeed in life despite the handicaps which life in New York has imposed on them. If you care for this spectator sport, tonight's event offers you an opportunity for an interesting evening.

If you have younger children whom you wish to entertain during the Christmas season, there is a second benefit for Wiltwyck School at which will be given the only New York screening of The Wizard of Oz, with Judy Garland. This is one of the great movies for children. Come on Thursday morning, December 28 at 9:30 to the RKO Theatre at Third Avenue and 58th Street. Tickets are $1.25 including tax, and I am sure all the children will have a good time.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL