My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—A number of different groups working for the nomination of Adlai Stevenson keep me busy these days just thanking them for their efforts.

There was, for example, the Fourth of July declaration favoring a Stevenson-Kennedy ticket and supported by more than 400 educators in 99 schools, colleges and universities in the Chicago area. It said significantly:

"We have problems today similar to those our founding fathers had to face. Then, as now, the overriding issue of the time was war and peace...We urge on you, therefore, the nomination of Adlai E. Stevenson as President of the U.S. and the nomination of Sen. John F. Kennedy as his running mate. Given such a ticket, we will elect it."

Then I have a letter from a man who has published two interesting little booklets, one of which is a guide covering social and educational events free of charge to everyone in New York. It is called "New York Free for All" and should offer many new avenues for enjoyment to many New Yorkers.

This man ended his note to me with a postscript that said, "Continue your fight for Stevenson. He seems to be one of the few Democrats creative enough to pull America out of our present perilous world position."

Another correspondent, a gentleman from Lancaster, Pa., sent me a clipping which, he said, expressed his feelings completely. It read:

"Only one man can lead our party successfully to victory in November. Adlai E. Stevenson alone can unite us sufficiently and enthusiastically enough to defeat the Republican candidate. How depressing it is to think we ran our best and strongest man twice when no Democrat could win and now we toy with the idea of putting forth other candidates when Stevenson can win. As for being a two-time loser, Adlai Stevenson has not been that—America has been a two-time loser and seems about to become a three-time loser."

Turning to the pre-convention activities themselves, I was interested in the proposed rules change that would prevent delegations from changing their votes on the initial roll calls. This, of course, was an effort to prevent Senator Kennedy's bandwagon from really rolling.

I went on Tuesday night to the opening of a series of concerts in New York sponsored by the Lower Eastside Neighborhood Association and Local 802 of the American Federation of Musicians.

These concerts are held in the outdoor auditorium near the Grand Street entrance to Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive and have been made possible by a grant from the Music Performance Trust Fund of the recording industry.

The concerts opened on a beautiful night, and the evening was made more pleasurable by the singing of Miss Martina Arroya, a young soprano who has had remarkably fine training. I hope she will realize her ambitions next year of singing with the New York Symphony and perhaps the Metropolitan Opera.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL