My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I have received a suggestion from some supporters of Adlai Stevenson in California. They propose that the members of all the Stevenson-for-President groups throughout the country ask their local newspapers to publish—on a nonpartisan basis—the names and addresses of all delegates to both the Republican and the Democratic Presidential conventions in their area.

This would not only let the rank-and-file voters know who is representing them at both conventions, but would also enable them to express their own preferences and convictions to the delegates directly.

This is, I think, a novel idea. Of course, it presupposes that the delegates to the conventions are free to listen to the voters in their districts.

Last Friday the metropolitan newspapers quoted one of the state party leaders as saying that Mr. Kennedy will get 87 votes out of the New York delegation to the Democratic convention. How long the leaders who put this over at the Albany meeting will be able to hold those 87 votes for Kennedy, or whether they will be able to add any to them, I do not know. But perhaps this suggestion from the Stevenson supporters in California is not without merit.

It might start bringing the delegates into closer touch with the people they are supposed to be representing, in a way that has never before been possible. So, if you feel that this is desirable, why not ask your local newspapers about the possibility of publishing the lists?

I am very pleased with the success which the Hudson Valley's Philharmonic Orchestra has had, in the area of which Poughkeepsie is the center. Claude Monteux, who became the conductor a year ago, has practically worked miracles.

The three regular concerts of the 1959-60 season were sold out before the year began. They added a bonus concert, and before the year was over the orchestra was committed to several extra concerts, including chamber music performances, a pop concert, an opera, and school concerts—all of which foretold what was in store for the future.

This season the Philharmonic has quadrupled its concerts, and will perform three each in Newburgh and Kingston, and six in Poughkeepsie. Among its soloists will be such internationally known performers as Roberta Peters, Isaac Stern, Claudio Arrau, Erica Morini and Rudolph Firkusney.

The orchestra has met with a great deal of enthusiasm, and the free school concerts have covered 60 schools in 25 communities. Of course, all this has not been accomplished without really hard work, and it will take continuing thought and devoted effort to make all the various concert series display the "S.R.O." sign.

I tell you this about our Hudson Valley Philharmonic Society because it is the kind of thing that is being done in many places throughout the country, and perhaps hearing of our success will encourage other people in other areas. It does require enthusiasm and support of a regular financial nature to be put through successfully.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL