My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I am getting telegrams from different areas of the country which say something like this: "Our grateful thanks for your endorsement of Adlai E. Stevenson. He is not an active candidate himself, but he remains the candidate of millions of Americans." The wires come mostly from head of committees, but individuals have sent messages, too.

All I can say is that it looks to me as though Governor Stevenson is simply not a candidate from his point of view, since he does not seek the nomination, but that he is the Democratic candidate for President for millions of Americans. In this sense, he is our candidate for the convention of 1960.

I have just received a communication from one of the parents concerned over the closing of a school, P.S. 56 at Hull Avenue, in the Bronx. She says:

"The school is good physically and ably staffed. It is being closed because there are only 30 children to a classroom. As a result the children will be distributed throughout the area in schools which have at present only 38 children to a class, and these schools are at present on a full-time schedule."

What is happening to our standards of education when we think that a class of 30 children is uneconomical and too small?

This actually is the number of children a teacher should have in one class. And we should be delighted to have a school with only 30 children in its classes.

One consideration has been ignored by the authorities in closing this school, namely, that much apartment-house construction is in progress in the neighborhood, and when these new buildings are completed, there will be 800 additional families. School authorities should think ahead to the time when this school would be crowded as a result of enrollment of children who are now babies.

My correspondent, who has a sense of humor, ends her letter by saying: "The final irony is the fairly reliable rumor that the school in question will be replaced by a luxury apartment building."

I call this situation to the attention of school officials, in case they have not really given it their full consideration, and to mothers of the area who can easily foresee what the closing of the school will mean to them in the next few years.

Bayside, Long Island, has had an international Children's Art Show at Les Clochettes, which is a nursery and kindergarten school. Australia, Iran, Israel, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, Norway, the Philippines, West Germany and other countries all sent examples of their young children's art.

The show included water colors, drawings, puppets, woodwork—in fact, everything through which children express themselves. It was undertaken to create a greater understanding among the children and more friendliness with those of their age in other parts of the world.

It took place early in June, but the art subjects probably are still available for viewing by anyone who lives in the area. The idea is interesting to me, for very young children are the first ones we must work with to create a permanent attitude toward peace in the world.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL