My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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MONTREAL—Premier Nikita Khrushchev seems to have returned to a calmer mood. In East Germany before going on to Moscow he only warned the next person to be elected President of the United States that he would make his life miserable. This was nothing very surprising, however, and I think would have been expected.

President Eisenhower received a warm welcome in Washington, even though he himself was in no cheerful mood. He did warn, however, that East-West tensions might deteriorate.

It is fortunate that the first new encounters of East and West will take place in the United Nations Security Council. We must use the U.N. to come to an agreement on internal inspection in the various countries. In that way we could do away with espionage and build the confidence that is the only way in which real peace can be achieved.

As I went in on Sunday to the meeting of the Reform Democratic organization at the Tavern on the Green in Central Park, New York, I saw many children going to their May Day frolics in the park. I am glad it is still possible for children to be carefree.

Now that the primary is over in Oregon and Senator John F. Kennedy has won the delegates in that state, he has unofficially lined up 317½ of the 761 votes needed for nomination at the Democratic national convention.

There are a number of little items that have come to my desk in the past few days which I want to bring to the attention of my readers.

Among them, for those who live in Missouri especially, is a rather unique project being undertaken by Bethlehem Boys' Town. This is to be, they tell me, a self-supporting boys' town, established near Fletcher, Mo.

Homeless and needy boys—16, 17 and 18 years old—are able to live there "not on charity but as volunteers, with dignity and self-respect, earning wages from their very first day by learning a trade or occupation to fit them for a useful, successful life as American citizens."

The organization advertises itself as "Bethlehem Village Printers," and the print shop is owned by the Golden Rule Missionaries, Inc. The boys are soliciting printing orders from nearby localities, as well as mail orders from more distant points. They also are asking for contributions for building and for equipping the shops, but they say that once they are established they intend to be self-supporting.

This is an interesting project and I hope it will be a successful one.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL