My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK. —A document called "Ways and Means Toward Peace—A Proposal" is being circulated in government circles by a group from Chapel Hill, N.C. And just at the present time when many of us are wondering if we are going to see a breakdown in all the efforts that have been carried on toward achieving peace, this piece of literature is worth studying.

Some of its suggestion would put us in the position of making more proposals, rather than to stand by to meet all the proposals made by the Soviet Union—and usually refusing to go along with them.

I think we and our allies are now in a position in which it would be well to act and act quickly. And this Chapel Hill document might very well suggest some ideas to our government officials which would lead to a quicker attainment of some of our goals.

I had the pleasure of having Governor Luther Hodges of North Carolina breakfast with me the other morning. He certainly made some interesting observations on the Soviet Union as a result of his trip with other Governors last summer.

I think many people in the United States would find most interesting reading in the little booklet of his letters, which has been published in North Carolina.

Things change so quickly in the Soviet Union, however, that some of the details as given may not be true today. I know that some of the things I saw there are no longer true. But the general understanding can be found in Governor Hodges' booklet, and it would be of much use to anyone wanting to know more about what the Soviets are doing.

While on the subject of Russia, I have had brought to my attention the fact that the President's special international program for cultural presentations is scheduled to send the American Ballet Theatre to the Soviet Union.

And, according to an article enclosed with the letter written to me, this would be a very great mistake. This theatre group has recently had some reverses that have required a program of reorganization and it would in no way represent what we have in our best ballet to send to Russia.

The Soviets are certainly not in need of any more ballet, since their own is probably at the highest level of what can be produced in any country.

Although cancer—a disease that concerns a major part of our population—is receiving some needed attention from our government, its major support for research and treatment comes from private groups.

Now, the American Cancer Society is going through preliminary reports of its annual appeal and it hopes to reach the 30 million mark in subscriptions that it attained last year.

The society will make its appeal on the basis of supporting research and carrying on at the same time a crusade for the education of our people all over the country with the aim of lowering cancer deaths through prompt recognition of the disease. This educational process requires numerous services that include providing transportation to a hospital or to a doctor, arranging for home nursing visits, lending sick-room equipment, and giving free dressings.

There is, of course, a hope through research of finding a solution for the cure of cancer, and the American Cancer Society is still asking for your contribution if you have not already sent it in.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL