My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON. —I began a busy day last Friday by meeting a group Brandeis University students with which I have been associated in a lecture course at the university this winter. We had an early lunch after they had visited the United Nations buildings, and they planned to sit in on a meeting of the Economic and Social Council in the afternoon.

I left the group after lunch and went back to my office at the American Association for the United Nations to meet some students from the Republic of Guinea. They looked so relieved when they found I could speak French and we had a pleasant time together.

These students had been in this country for several weeks, traveling in the South, Middle West and New England. They had been staying in American homes and felt they had learned a great deal about American life. As so often happens, the differences between their own circumstances and what they found here made it difficult for them to see how they could apply their experiences in this country to their own way of life.

I had time for only a little office work before leaving to make a recording, and from there I went to the annual meeting in New York of the Friendly Visitors to the Women's House of Detention.

I was impressed by the report of the president, Mrs. Janet Levin, a charming young woman. If anything can be done to improve the dreary House of Detention, Mrs. Levin and her co-workers are doing it.

These women have the concept that the inmates need more than a little money when they leave the House of Detention. In the past, a departing inmate was given a dress or a suit and 25 cents, so they often went back to their old way of earning a living because it was the only thing open to them.

But with a friend to help them find a job, to help them live until they find that job and even to help them return to their families, the whole picture changes. This help is being offered by the Friendly Visitors, and if there are women coming out of the House of Detention to make a success of their lives, it is due in large part to this organization which Correction Commissioner Anna M. Kross brought into being.

I got home in time to receive Frau Rosa Jochmann, a lady from Vienna, Austria, who is in this country under State Department auspices. She is a Socialist member of Parliament. She said her visit to this country had been most interesting.

At a little after 5 p.m. Lady Stella Reading; her niece, Miss Veronica Glegg, and Prof. and Mrs. Lawrence Fuchs of Brandeis University all started with Miss Maureen Corr and myself for Hyde Park. The whole Brandeis class was with me at the Memorial Library there on Saturday, and we had a picnic on my lawn.

On Sunday I went to Boston for my television program, and I was there Monday as well, but I will tell you about that later.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL