My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK. —The situation in South Korea has apparently improved, but I doubt whether the resignation of President Syngman Rhee and new elections will solve the basic problems if there is no progress made in solving the other difficulties in that country.

When President Eisenhower promised the American people he would bring peace in Korea, I believe many people thought that he meant he would press for a complete understanding in that area between North and South Korea and for the solution of economic troubles. These troubles have never really been cleared up in South Korea.

As one looks at the situation there today, it is evident that President Eisenhower will leave an unfinished job to his successor. Perhaps the United Nations and the United States itself should pay more attention to the final solution of difficulties in that part of the world.

General Charles de Gaulle was received with evident enthusiasm by the people of New York City, and the French colony gave him an especially warm welcome.

As a limousine bearing the general moved toward the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel from the Mayor's luncheon for him, I was on my way to a meeting on Park Avenue. All the cars along my route were being detoured, so I got out and walked four blocks.

It was easy to see the interest of everyone in catching a glimpse of the general whenever there was an opportunity.

I could not help being sorry on Tuesday evening of this week for those who commute regularly by car between New Jersey and New York City via the Lincoln Tunnel.

I haven't the remotest idea what happened, but the approaches to the tunnel, the tunnel itself and the highway several miles beyond were so jammed with traffic that our car, going to Metuchen, N.J., progressed at a snail's pace.

To cover that part of our route to Metuchen took, I believe, nearly an hour. I was very late, but Harry Hirshfield was presiding at the United Jewish Appeal dinner in Metuchen, so I felt sure all would be well. I felt that even if left to carry the whole speech-making assignment alone, Mr. Hirshfield would have made the dinner a complete success.

I did arrive in time for the program, however, and I enjoyed the evening and our rapid return trip which enabled Mr. Hirshfield to make his midnight appointment on television without difficulty.

I have just received a communication from the National Epilepsy League, Inc., which, I think, marks a real step forward in the league's service to epileptics. It says: "In view of the long-term nature of epilepsy, it is apparent to us from the results of inquiries we have conducted that the cumulative costs of medications imposes a real financial burden upon a significant portion of the nation's estimated 1,500,000 epileptics."

And so the league will now fill its members' prescriptions at cost. This will really lighten the burden of many sufferers from this disease which can be controlled by medication and care.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL