My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—I have been meaning for some time to draw the attention of my readers to the World Affairs Center for the United States, which is on the main floor of the Carnegie Endowment Building, First Avenue and 47th Street, New York City.

Anyone who wants information about any specific subject connected with any country anywhere in the world or with the United Nations or the efforts being made by different organizations for peace can get this information at the World Affairs Center without running from one place to another.

Fortunately, many of the organizations working for peace along different lines have their offices in this building. Among them are the American Association for the United Nations, the American Friends Service Committee, and the National Council of Women.

The World Affairs Center also operates a book shop in connection with its activities, has an auditorium on the first floor, and on the second floor there are rooms which the Carnegie Endowment has set up and which groups can rent for meetings.

At intervals the World Affairs Center itself gathers individuals for briefing and for visits to the U.N. Such meetings often have meant the awakening of interest in businessmen and government officials to visit the U.N. for the first time and become aware of its many activities.

The World Affairs Center also publishes a magazine, called INTERCOM. This magazine is of value to people all over the world but particularly valuable, I think, to those in our country who are interested in foreign affairs. Well-informed experts are the contributing writers.

The February issue of this magazine earned some very flattering notices. For instance, the Committee for International Economic Growth wrote: "It (INTERCOM, Feb. issue) is, by all odds, the most useful listing of materials and organizations concerned with foreign aid which has ever been compiled."

Organizations that differ widely in their interests commented in the following way. The National Association of Manufacturers said: "Congratulations on that excellent February 1960 issue. With its special treatment on foreign aid, I believe it is one of the best compendiums on the subject I have seen." The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. said: "Congratulations on another great publication. We are bringing it to the attention of our constituency."

This publication covers foreign aid in a very comprehensive way and will be of value to young and old who want really to understand the issues before us on this subject. The director of the World Affairs Center, Mr. Richard S. Winslow, has long experience in connection with our own government and the U.N., and no one could be better fitted to direct the activities for the benefit of the general public.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL