My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—It must have been bad news, indeed, for everybody to read that jobs declined abnormally during the month of March. The weather, of course, was blamed, and perhaps rightly so, for March was a strange month in this regard.

Nevertheless, all is not right with our economy at the present time, and hiding the fact is not going to improve it. It is to be regretted that we do not face the fact that, in spite of a large number of employees, we are not allowing our economy to grow so as to meet the increased population and the young people coming into the labor market.

The Administration's financial policies do not seem to lead to full employment. The time has come, I believe, to take a good look at the ways in which we can accomplish the ends we have in mind—full employment and a growing economy. The end result would bring about some government saving in the field of social welfare and might make it possible for the government to think in terms of education, which is a vital consideration if we are to meet automation in a creative way.

Automation is a challenge. We cannot stop modern discoveries. It will mean we can produce more and more and free men from labor. Then we must see to it that men know how to use the hours that would be free from toil.

Education must meet this challenge, and it is to be hoped that our government is already planning ways in which adult education as well as our regular curricula can open wide new doors of interest and activity. This would mean that men could use their creative ability to a greater extent and, therefore, have greater enjoyment.

I spent Tuesday the 12th at Hyde Park and, as always, I was touched by the kind remembrances of some of my husband's associates and neighbors on this anniversary of his death.

On this 15th anniversary the sun shone, and Mr. Averell Harriman, Mr. Sam Rosenman and Mr. Isador Lubin announced at a press conference in the library that in the autumn some lectures would be held at Harvard on the period of my husband's administration. This would have pleased my husband, for he always had a great sense of his place in history and hoped that he was accomplishing things for the people that would have an effect on the future.

The other day I received a volume which I think will be of great value to people like myself who constantly remember only part of a quotation and cannot remember the whole of it. The book is called "The Great Quotations," and the selections were made by George Seldes.

Everyone may not agree with all of Mr. Seldes' choices, but it is almost a certainty that the reader looking through the book for pleasure will enjoy it and will be doubly thrilled when he finds something in particular that he has been searching for.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL