My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—My life has been changed for me for the next few days because I very stupidly stood between two cars on a street on Sunday afternoon and only watched the oncoming cars from the left. I heard a car start up, but I did not realize it was the car on my right.

The next thing I knew something bumped into me and I lost my balance and fell down. I was up again in a minute and retrieved my umbrella and my handbag and went on to the appointment I was about to keep.

But I found that my right foot was decidedly painful and I could not put my weight on it, so I hobbled along and hoped it would improve. I made my little speech for cancer research at the benefit where I was going, and then, fortunately, my friends, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lash, took me home.

At home I found a group of little girls who had come in for an interview. After a few minutes I left them with their chaperones to have some cocoa and cookies and excused myself and went upstairs to ask Dr. David Gurewitsch to look at my foot and do something to it so I could keep my dinner appointment.

At this point I was not walking with great ease. He did what he could and I managed to dress and get to the dinner, which was given by the coat and suit industry for the benefit of Brandeis University. I made my speech sitting on a high pillow in a chair!

On Monday morning Dr. Gurewitsch took me up to the Medical Center for an X-ray. Nothing is broken, fortunately; I have only some torn ligaments. I now have two hand canes and a beautifully taped leg and am confined to my apartment for a few days—something that has not happened to me for a long while.

I had to ask my youngest son John to fill my place at a meeting in Providence on Monday, and I was certainly grateful to him that he was able to go. I am also grateful to the many people who have called and asked about me. But I am annoyed with myself for being so foolish as to let myself get knocked down, for I should be old enough to watch what is around me on every side.

That must have been quite an economic bombshell that Premier Nikita Khrushchev handed out to members of the Soviet bloc at the recent meeting in Moscow of Eastern European ministers.

Why he did this is not quite clear to me, unless he felt that it was necessary to give them a shot in the arm and make them try harder to raise their own production. Or perhaps he was trying to impress on them their dependence on the Soviet Union.

In any case, he is quite evidently looking forward to having more economic relations with other countries outside the Communist group and perhaps, too, is thinking of raising the quota of what he allows his own people in the way of cereals and domestic goods.

I am glad that the voting in Wisconsin's Presidential primary is now in the past. I still feel that these Presidential primaries are a great waste of the time and energy of the candidates. It seems to me they should wait until the general election to fight their real opposition, rather than fight each other.

In primaries they must find some things to attack each other on, and in desperation they often say things that would be far better left unsaid—things that they practically have to repudiate when they come to the real campaign and sometimes, too, have to run on the same ticket with an adversary in the primaries.

With the Republicans it's different. It's only a question of public relations people presenting their one and only candidate in a variety of ways.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL