My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PROVIDENCE, R.I.—I arrived home Friday morning after a very easy flight, and in the evening I had the pleasure of dining with some friends, Dr. William T. Levy and his mother. Afterward I went to a performance of "A Thurber Carnival." Burgess Meredith certainly does a good job in his direction of these entertaining and delightful Thurber sketches. I loved "The Unicorn in the Garden," and "The Gentlemen Shoppers" seemed to be having such a good time. "File and Forget" struck a reminiscent note for me. Altogether, it was a good Thurber collection and provided an enjoyable evening.

Just before I left the hotel in Salt Lake City I was confronted with someone who insisted that I fill out a census blank immediately, though I told him I was from New York and would probably have to fill one out at home. Being away from New York, there were certain questions I could not possibly answer, and hence I am afraid my own census filing was not a very great success. But at least I will be counted as living in the U. S. at this period!

It was interesting to read that New York City's Fair Housing Practices law was upheld on Friday by State Supreme Court Justice Steuer. Suit had been brought on the ground that the Sharkey-Brown-Isaacs law was an unjustified interference with the complainant's right to conduct his business. The judge said: "The individual must yield to what legislative authority deems is for the common good." This law prohibits discrimination because of race, religion or national origin in non-government aided housing.

The decision just at this moment points up the failure of the Republican-led state legislature to approve a proposal made by their own Republican Governor for a state Fair Housing Practices law. I think there will be a sense of outrage that the state is held back in its development along these lines. We have led in the effort to improve our housing situation in the city, and the state, under Republican control, should certainly keep pace with the city which is under Democratic control.

It is reported in the newspapers that Vice President Nixon claims to have an open mind on a possible invitation to Mr. Rockefeller to be his running mate. Why should Rockefeller consider such an offer? Being Governor of New York is certainly a more interesting job than being Vice President. Few of our Vice Presidents are remembered for very long after they have served, unless by chance death of a President makes them the Chief Executive and they become well known in that capacity. In itself the Vice Presidency has never seemed a very interesting position. Certainly, for a young man who has bright future political prospects, it does not seem to hold many attractions.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL