My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—It is encouraging to read that the United States really is trying to find compromises through the negotiations now going on in Geneva so that a treaty can be arrived at on nuclear testing.

I have never understood why the U.S. has kept insisting that we would not ban underground nuclear explosions, because they are extremely difficult to detect. I think what we should do is to redouble our efforts to find new ways of detecting and not stop trying to get any tests banned.

One of the things we now suggest, apparently, is that everybody should redouble their efforts to study methods for detecting underground explosions. This seems to me very sensible.

I have a request to speak again of the hope that some people have that before long the Congress will proclaim one day in the year a "National Teachers' Day."

It is not proposed that this should be a national holiday, but just a day on which we should recall in every way we can how much we owe to the teachers of the country.

It might also help—if we had a day of this kind—to overcome some of the difficulties we have in bringing home to the citizens of every community the need for backing whatever plans are made that will enable communities to improve their school facilities and to pay higher salaries to their teachers.

With better pay teachers could afford just to be teachers. They would not have to hold a couple of other jobs in order to be able to live. In the big cities this would make a big difference, for many teachers now have no time to stay after school and perhaps help the few students who need such help. They must hold other jobs in order to support their families.

A National Teachers' Day would make us think about the importance of the teacher to our children. It also might make a great difference in the delinquency problem of our country.

No one can look at the proposal for the development of a World Trade Center at the lower tip of Manhattan Island (New York City) without being interested in the thought of an exhibition center where there would be shown goods from all over the world.

As one minor by-product, think what an education this would provide for our young people!

The originator of the idea is the Downtown Lower Manhattan Association, and one of the heads of this group is David Rockefeller. Everything in which these young Rockefellers have a hand seems to have a real touch of imagination. And I am sure that the hotel proposed for this project will not only be a delightful hotel for tourists, but would be an ideal location for various functions sponsored by the businessmen of that section of the city.

Now the Tri-State Port of New York Authority has been asked to work to make detailed studies in an effort to find out how the center can be built and operated. I think the citizens of New York City are going to watch this development with great interest.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL