My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Congress has under consideration an appropriation of $886,400 for a memorial in Washington to Theodore Roosevelt, and details of this proposed memorial are in a published report on the Theodore Roosevelt Centennial Celebration.

Fittingly enough, the memorial is an island in the Potomac River which would be made into a park to shelter the wildlife which Theodore Roosevelt loved so much. This park would be of great value to Washington's young people, as well as to their elders, and I hope that Congress will appropriate the money for it in this session so that the work on the memorial can be completed.

Theodore Roosevelt was my uncle. And although he was a Republican and not a Democrat, I think our citizens, both Republicans and Democrats, feel that he was one of our greatest and most colorful Presidents and that there should be a memorial to his memory in our capital.

You have been asked, or soon will be asked, for your annual contribution to the American Red Cross. By this time you must know, as a good citizen, the value of this organization. All of us, therefore, should be members and, if possible, make some contribution to its work as well as to lend it our financial assistance.

The government gives its blessing to the Red Cross, but financial support comes entirely from voluntary contributions from the public during the annual appeal for members and funds. Chapters often make their appeal in the autumn, but the drive may come at any time, particularly at this time of year.

You know, of course, that it is the Red Cross that furnishes help when disasters of any kind strike a community, and last year one-third of every Red Cross dollar was spent, as it will be this year, in assisting servicemen and veterans and their families on personal and family problems. Your blood donations are probably made through the Red Cross.

First aid and training in safety for those who use small boats in recreational activities are provided by the Red Cross in many communities. Many are taught how to swim. The classes in first aid, in nursing and in educational work, as well as the cooperation with Red Cross services in other countries, are the all-important things you support when you give to the Red Cross.

I took part on Monday in a convocation at Hunter College here in New York in honor of the college's president, George Shuster, who is retiring this year.

The citizens of New York City will regret his retirement, for he has made great contributions not only to education but to the civic life of the city. I felt flattered that I was able to pay my respects to him together with many other people who look upon Mr. Shuster as a respected and admired citizen of our city.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL