My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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DE KALB, Ill.—I spent last Sunday in Boston working on the education television program, "Prospects of Mankind," which will be shown at later dates in various parts of the country. The program, which will have its second showing next Sunday, is produced by Station WGBH, the educational TV station in Boston in cooperation with Brandeis University.

The subject for the second show is disarmament, and those appearing on the panel are Mr. Jules Moch of France; Mr. Trevor Gardener, who was Assistant Secretary for Air and now serves on the President's Science Advisory Committee even though he has returned to industry and is engaged in making missiles; and Mr. Saville Davis, managing editor of the Christian Science Monitor. I think you will find this an informative and lively program.

I took my second class at Brandeis University on Monday morning with Professor Fuchs, who is certainly a most-stimulating person to be with, and the young people seem to be interested and to be doing a great deal of thinking. The hour-and-a-half discussion session flies past very quickly, and I think I learn much more than I could ever teach.

On Monday I caught a plane a little after one o'clock in Boston and met Miss Maureen Corr at the airport in Chicago where she had arrived 15 minutes before me. Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Smith from Northern Illinois University met us and we drove the 65 miles to this town.

De Kalb has rich farmland. We were told, when I remarked on the general look of prosperity, the well-kept farm buildings and the carefully tended fields, that this land sells for $500 an acre.

This is hog and corn land, but there is a good sprinkling of Black Angus cattle to be seen, and there must be some dairy farming. The barns are really magnificent and in most cases the houses really look spacious and comfortable. I was told that farming had become big business in this area, so that much machinery is used, and when I inquired if this machinery was pooled and used cooperatively I learned that this was a necessity for many.

Northern Illinois University is an all-purpose school. It gives a liberal arts course, but also trains teachers, has a big department for business administration and a number of other schools. Nearly all the students come from within 100 miles, except, of course, for the foreign students, of which there are two or three dozen who come from every area of the world. There is no racial or religious discrimination, either in the faculty or in the student body, and because there is a mixed population in this area the student body comes from various backgrounds.

My evening speech was made in the school's largest auditorium, which was filled almost entirely with students, but was also piped into various other rooms and over the local radio station, because there was not enough room for the townspeople at the school.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL