My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—One of my correspondents has drawn my attention to the interesting fact that we should celebrate this year the 100th anniversary of three distinguished Americans who have had a great influence on the world in which we live today.

The first of these three born in 1859 was John Dewey. He certainly has affected education in this country, and his influence has been very beneficial. Nevertheless, it seems to me that any educational policies should be reviewed frequently, since they must always be adjusted to the needs of a changing world. However, we have much to be grateful for as we celebrate this distinguished citizen's hundredth anniversary.

A second person who was born in 1859 was Florence Kelley. She founded the Consumers League, and I have an idea that more people received their education in the need for social services through her activities than through those of any other human being with the exception perhaps of Lillian Wald.

Finally, the third person born in 1859 who has left a mark on his time was Thomas Mott Osborne. He certainly aroused the conscience of this nation on the subject of prisons and prisoners. He was a great humanitarian who insisted on believing that if you trusted human beings you would nearly always find something good within them responding to your trust.

All three of these people we should remember with gratitude and celebrate their 100th anniversaries with a new dedication to the ideals by which they lived.

On last Friday night I had the pleasure of dining with two friends who were anxious to show me how they had settled in their new apartment. It was charming, and the view from their windows over the city is quite delightful.

I must say that I look with considerable envy at anyone who has finally moved his furniture, has hung all his pictures, and has placed every knickknack where he wants them to be, because all this still lies before me.

Earlier in the day last Friday I looked at the apartment into which I hope to move sometime next week, and I must say it looked as though no one would live there for a very long time, much less have floors and fixtures and furniture in order. But I suppose things always look their worst before they begin to look better, and I am assured that next week will bring about some great changes.

At 9:15 Friday night I reached the Taft High-School auditorium in the Bronx, where the Bronx chapter of the American Association for the United Nations was celebrating United Nations Day. A highlight of their program was to have various groups of peoples of foreign descent sing some of their own particular folk songs.

Mr. Clark Eichelberger and I spoke, and I answered some questions before finally adjourning at 10:30. The chapter gained many new members and I hope it will be a more active and stronger chapter in our metropolitan district from now on.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL