My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON—On Monday I left Midland, Texas, at seven o'clock in the morning, which meant getting up at 5:30, and took a plane back to Dallas. The airport was not far from Southern Methodist University, where our regional meeting for the American Association for the United Nations was being held.

At the morning session there of about 20 state presidents we discussed the problems of setting up a really good chapter in every state of the Union and a state board to represent the different localities of each state.

After the morning meeting there was a luncheon sponsored by the two student forums and the Dallas United Nations Association. There were a number of speeches, none of them very long, but I felt that our collegiate council representative, Joe Sills, did a good job of explaining his work. In every report he makes he emphasizes the importance of the aim that the various collegiate councils, wherever they are near enough to the AAUN chapters, should work with the adult groups.

Mr. Clark Eichelberger also spoke very well, and finally I spoke, but I fear I was rather too long, for there was no time left for questions from the floor. However, that was taken care of at the night session.

In Texas, and in Dallas particularly, where they have had so much difficulty in establishing a United Nations chapter, the participating groups have a magnificent program in progress for the current United Nations Week. There is something of interest going on for everyone throughout the week, until October 24, when United Nations Day is finally reached.

New Mexico and Oklahoma have new chairmen, both of whom are energetic gentlemen. State Senator Tibo Chavez of New Mexico has a real problem of getting started in his state. Lt. Col. Ralph Elliott, the chairman for Oklahoma who is stationed at Fort Sill, will have a somewhat easier time in his state. I was delighted to find an Army officer with real interest in the United Nations and its possibilities in preserving the peace.

Seventy-two organizations joined in sponsoring the meeting at Southern Methodist, which shows, I think, the change of heart as regards the United Nations, and that is encouraging.

There was a big meeting on Monday night in McFarlin Auditorium, which was open to the public and at which I spoke. On Tuesday we held conferences during the morning, and in the late afternoon Miss Baillargeon and I flew to Washington, D.C., our next stop in this busy United Nations Week program.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL