My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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DALLAS—After attending a very successful luncheon in New York City last Saturday, which was the opening of the membership drive of the Metropolitan Division of the American Association for the United Nations, I took a plane for Dallas and arrived here at 7:15 p.m., which was really 9:15 by my time.

I found an enthusiastic group at the airport waiting for me. My granddaughter, Chandler, and her husband, Henry Lindsley III, had come up from Midland to meet me. Henry's sister was with them and also an old friend of mine, Mr. Frank Harting, who has returned to Dallas from New York and opened his own antique shop here. They were all waiting to go to dinner.

I left my bags at the hotel, and we went to a wonderful restaurant run by a Polish refugee who had been at the Embassy in Washington during World War II. When he reminded me of meeting me in Washington years ago, he also told me his chef had cooked for us in Paris during one of the sessions of the General Assembly of the United Nations over there. He certainly cooked a most delicious dinner for us.

Afterward we went to Mr. Harting's antique shop. His trade mark is a most-appealing gold donkey, which he bought in Italy, with its panniers on both sides filled with flowers. The shop also was filled with fascinating things, many of which would attract any real antique collector. Although I am moving into a new apartment in New York I will have only one floor, though I eventually hope to have two, and the one floor will be crowded. So, I have to restrain any longing I have for antiques at the moment, though I certainly saw some things I would enjoy possessing. Sometime in the future, perhaps, I will be back in Dallas and then I can acquire some of these beautiful things.

On Sunday morning early we took off in Henry Lindsley's little single-engined plane for Midland. It takes him about two hours and five minutes to make the flight and it is all over flat country. You get a feeling of the vastness of Texas as you pick out a city here and there, and see the long stretches of country in between.

We arrived at Midland and I met my two great-grandchildren, whom I had never seen before—little Ruth, aged two and a half, and Hays, nearly 18 months. Both are charming and already distinct individuals.

Everytime I visit my granddaughter Chandler I marvel at her executive ability and the way in which she manages her house and the children. These are the two great things in her life and she gives them the best of her mind and heart.

They had a delightful party in the evening, simply and charmingly done, and I was glad to meet many of their friends. All these young people are working very successfully to achieve not only financial success but to make of their city and of themselves a community which grows in many ways—culturally and artistically as well as financially.

Of greater interest to Texas even than the steel strike, I think, was Speaker Sam Rayburn's opening of the campaign to nominate Senator Lyndon Johnson as Presidential candidate. President Truman spoke to a group of Democrats here on Saturday night and then preached a good political sermon at a suburban Methodist church on Sunday morning before starting off to see Senator Johnson.

While Mr. Truman did not comment himself, the newspapers noticed that there was a warm meeting between Senator Johnson, Speaker Rayburn and the former President, all of whom will have considerable say about the nominee at the next Democratic national convention.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL