My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—In a recent column headed "The President's Adventure," Walter Lippman says something that it is important for us to bear in mind. As we move first to the President's European visit, writes Mr. Lippman, then to Mr. Khrushchev's visit to us, and then to the President's return visit to the Soviet Union, we must not expect of necessity to come to definitive results. I think we may have many visits before we come to firm agreements, and I am glad that Mr. Lippman has pointed this out.

It would be nice for West Berlin if the problem of that city could be settled, but perhaps it isn't going to be. Perhaps we are going to talk for a long time. Mr. Adenauer is not ready to pay the high price for any real West Berlin settlement, and probably we are not, either. And so we go on with makeshifts—how long, nobody knows.

This is also true of any number of other situations. Patience is not one of the American people's virtues, but the development of patience may be one of the things that will make us grow strong in the next few years. Patience and persistence and unwillingness to give up or to make certain compromises merely to come to some conclusions may be very important. A polite, firm attitude may be frustrating to all of us, but it may be the way we will win in the long run.

We should not pass over without mention the Queen's action in making Kwame Nkrumah a member of her Privy Council. We must say a word of appreciation for the long and pateint lifetime work which was what the Prime Minister of Ghana really celebrated when he went from Accra to Balmoral Castle. Here was a man, the hereditary chief of the Nzima tribe, who had lived in a mud village of the Gold Coast, had been in a British jail, but now was the Prime Minister of the new country of Ghana. It was a really great occasion, not only for him but for the colored peoples of Africa, and we congratulate both the Prime Minister and the Queen.

The U. S. Committee for the U. N. has put out a cook book which they hope will sell profitably, but which they hope will also acquaint people with the foods of foreign lands. I find some of the recipes very intrguing and I hope we can try a number of them.

I have always had a lively interest in foreign foods, and it was amusing the other day to read the newspaper account of a gourmet club organized to learn more about eating customs around the world. The Jamaica breakfast looked entrancing in the accompanying photograph, but I could not help remembering the breakfast I had in an admiral's garden in Hawaii where I was given a whole pineapple filled with fruits of various kinds. This was a delicious way to start the morning: having come off the plane after spending the night flying in from the West Coast, I was certainly delighted with this feast of fruit and hoped to repeat it back home. But I have never since found the opportunity to collect quite so many fruits and give anybody a whole pineapple in which to eat them!

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL