My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—When I was in Grand Junction, Colo., last week I was very much interested to learn from Mr. Preston Walker, publisher of the Daily Sentinel, that each year the Independent Order of Odd Fellows sponsors a pilgrimage to the United Nations. Mesa County, in which Grand Junction is located, sponsors one of the students on the pilgrimage.

Most of the young people who make this annual trip are high-school juniors who earn their way by taking part in a contest on "Why I Would Like to See the United Nations in Action."

My husband was a member of the Odd Fellows, and I was interested to learn that the sovereign lodge of the IOOF sponsors the trip, arranges for buses, and takes care of many other details. The Grand Junction lodge and the Rebekah Lodges sponsor the students in the Colorado area, raising money for the trip expenses by holding dinners and other entertainments. This year a boy named Donnie Cooper will go from Grand Junction, Clifford Hofwolt from Palisades, Ann Luthera Barcus from Fruita, and Carmen Kennedy from Clifton.

The students will visit the U.N., go to Hyde Park to visit my husband's memorial, and stop at many other historic spots on their way to New York and back.

I think I should tell you that if by chance you are motoring in Colorado in the area of Grand Junction you should spend a night in one of the super-comfortable motel rooms at the Hotel La Porte. I have seldom seen better-arranged accommodations. All the rooms are air-conditioned and each unit has a television set. The place is a stone's throw from "The Caravan," which claims to have the best food in town, and certainly it was very good. And there is a delightful swimming pool for the hotel's guests. So, if your vacation takes you in or near Grand Junction, I am acting as a guide to good accommodations.

Early Monday morning (in fact, we were up at 6:30) we left in my son's plane for Denver. As usual the weather was carefully checked. In that part of the world you can see the thunder clouds building up and you look for a spot to go around them or under them, which makes flying quite interesting.

Elliott stayed with us through lunch at Mr. and Mrs. Harry Combs' place, and while there I learned that my friend, Nila Magidoff, had been in Denver to lecture, had done very well, and had also stayed with Mr. and Mrs. Combs. They enjoyed her enormously and wanted to know the latest news about her.

Many of my readers will shortly be reading a book, "Russian Duet," by Mrs. Mark Ethridge about a trip to Russia that she took last summer with Nila Magidoff. And I am sure the book will give a most interesting account of that trip, both from the view of an American and a good reporter like Mrs. Ethridge and from the point of view of a Russian visiting her native land after a number of years of living as an American citizen.

We spent the remainder of Monday afternoon at the home of my grandson, Bill Roosevelt, and visited his engaging little son and stepdaughter, both charming children. Somehow I find it difficult to realize that Elliott is a grandfather, even though I am quite accustomed to thinking of myself as a great-grandmother!

Elliott left cheerfully, telling us that in order to get to Meeker he might have to fly through Wyoming, but he telephoned before we left after supper for my evening plane to tell us that he had arrived safely and in time for dinner at the ranch with Minnewa.

My granddaughter, Mrs. Bill Roosevelt, and my niece, Amy Roosevelt, saw me off at the plane and I reached Kansas City, Mo., at midnight, where Miss Corr had already reached her hotel.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL