My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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MILWAUKEE—On Friday of last week I flew from Idlewild Airport in New York at an early hour of the morning for Denver, Colo., where my son, Elliott, was to meet me, if the weather was good, and fly me to Colorado Springs in his own plane for a seminar going on for foreign students at Colorado College. Unfortunately, the weather at Meeker from where Elliott had to come, was bad and he could not fly to Denver, so he had to notify the college that I could not be there, which was a great disappointment to him and to me.

After my arrival in Denver the weather improved and I was flown in a one-engine plane to Meeker for which I was very grateful. It gave me an opportunity to be with Elliott and his wife, Minnewa, which pleased me, for I would not have been at the ranch till late evening had I been obliged to drive by car. So many people in the West fly their own small planes that one counts on it as one would not do in the East.

Elliott and Minnewa are remodelling their ranch, so the next day I had plenty to see. My daughter-in-law has very good taste and is very ingenious in arranging houses, so I think all that she is doing will be very attractive when finished. Just at present it is very chaotic.

We had a picnic lunch with Mr. and Mrs. Al White from Arkansas and Mr. and Mrs. Lewis from Wichita, Kansas. The view from the White's porch is up the White River Valley and is very lovely. This is the season when the trout are plentiful, so here and there, as you drive about you catch sight of young fishermen—some as young as six years old—casting their flies to catch the elusive trout. On my last morning in Meeker I had delicious trout for breakfast, caught by one of the boys on the ranch.

On Sunday the weather proved fairly good and Elliott took me over to Grand Junction where the Daily Sentinel, which has published my column ever since the earliest days, was sponsoring an afternoon meeting at which I was to speak and an evening dinner at which I spoke again.

Grand Junction considers itself the center of activity for the Western slope of Colorado, and Mr. Preston Walker, who is the publisher of the Daily Sentinel, has followed in the footsteps of his father who was the publisher before him. They have been in the newspaper business and in politics and interested in every new development in the state of Colorado as far back as anyone of the family can remember. They are strong believers in the United Nations and so my three o'clock speech was on the U.N.

The dinner in the evening was for leading citizens from neighboring towns, and when you speak of neighboring towns in Colorado it covers an extended territory. One neighbor drove 260 miles to attend the dinner.

Those in attendance at this affair were primarlly interested in the improvement of their own communities and much of their time is spent in working on local situations. Mr. Walker, however, wanted me, if possible, to show them how our home situation touched the world situation and how closely what we do at home affects the world situation and our leadership of the non-Communist world.

That was easy enough to do and after I finished we had a period of questions. I think I have seldom had more interesting questions, which showed considerable thought on the part of these people regarding world problems.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL