My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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MEEKER, Colo.—We apparently will be seeing a flight of American investment capital from Cuba, and perhaps from other Central and South American countries where revolutions seem to be in the offing. For compensation offered by the Cuban government in payment for the taking over of American-owned sugar cane land, under the new agrarian reform program, certainly will not be considered satisfactory by American owners.

The difficulty, of course, is that most of the Latin-American countries need capital investment from the United States, but they also need agrarian reform very badly. Whether there is a way to accomplish both with fairness is a matter that might well be given careful study. It will affect the lives of people in many countries where the division of land will be helpful but where those who get the land may find it difficult to earn a living without some capital investment.

A farmer, after being given land, needs tools, cattle, seeds and sometimes funds for the maintenance of his family during the first year. The money to meet these needs must be found. The governments of most of these countries cannot meet these demands unless they get substantial loans or there are foreign investments in other areas of the country.

This is a problem which, it seems to me, has not been adequately considered, and it might be well for Cuban President Fidel Castro and others to give it some serious thought.

Technical experts seem to get along better with each other than our diplomats do these days, for the Soviet Union has agreed to a study by experts of new U.S. data on the problem of detecting nuclear explosions in outer space.

The Soviets still refuse to agree to a joint study of new U. S. data on detecting underground nuclear blasts, and this seems to be the main obstacle to reaching any decision on controls of a kind that the West would accept.

I was visited the other day in New York by two gentlemen representing a committee interested in organizing in that city, as a gesture of goodwill, a celebration in honor of a great Jewish-Spanish poet, Solomon Ibn Gabriol.

They felt it would draw together on a cultural level the Spanish-speaking people of New York and remind them of areas of cultural cooperation with the Jews in the past.

This is an idea that would have to be discussed and organized more carefully, but I am always interested to see groups wanting to draw together people of various backgrounds, languages and races.

It is so easy to find differences among us and apparently no difficult to find reasons for drawing closer together.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL