My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I want to pass along some information that came to me the other day about a service which is available through the National Sculpture Society, here in New York City. This society has a number of large photographs of the best sculptures of American patriots which may be borrowed for exhibition throughout the country.

These photographs cover a long period of American history, beginning with the Revolution. There are a number of soldiers among them, but the collection also includes explorers and settlers who opened up our country, statesmen, lawyers, and even some foreigners, such as General Lafayette who helped us become a nation.

It seems to me a vital part of the education of our young people is a familiarity with famous figures in our history, whose names our youngsters should know, whose stories they should be familiar with, and whose devotion to our country they should emulate.

These photographs are being sent around the country and may be borrowed by museums, libraries, schools and other organizations to be used in connection with the study of American history. Of course, all of the statues and sculptures that may be found in different parts of America will not be found in this collection, but there is at least a representative quantity available.

The society also has made collections of pictures covering ecclesiastical subjects, and there are photographs for a general exhibition which covers garden and portrait and monumental sculpture by fellows and members of the National Sculpture Society. This last collection would be valuable to any school giving art courses where it would be difficult or impossible for the students to see the actual work or even replicas of the work of great sculptors.

I spent an interesting little while the other afternoon at the World Trade Fair at the Coliseum here. Not having time to see the whole of it, which in any case requires a special knowledge and interest of specific goods, I concentrated on seeing the international exhibits.

It seemed to me that Czechoslovakia has a most beautiful exhibit. The Czechs must have someone in charge of foreign exhibits who has a real artistic flair. For at the Brussels World's Fair last year the exhibits in the Czechoslovak building were among the finest there, and here her products are as well displayed as possible.

Israel has an interesting exhibit and her new diamond-cutting industry is shown to great advantage. I also liked the displays put on by the Japanese and the Benelux countries. And Holland's hams looked delicious—as I know from experience that they are—but I had not known before that the Dutch packaged turkeys in the same way and I shall certainly try one before long.

At the United Arab Republic exhibit they had the thick white rugs with criss-crossed geometric patterns in black that I had seen and bought in Morocco. They are the nicest rugs I know of and I wish they were available here to buy, for it takes a long while to buy them over there and have them shipped to this country.

A fair of this kind teaches people a good deal about the people of other nations—their skills, their arts and crafts—and I was very happy to have a little time to get in to see a bit of this one. I hope many New Yorkers and visitors to New York are taking advantage of this opportunity.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL