My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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by Eleanor Roosevelt

NEW YORK—I read with regret the other day of the death of Myron C. Taylor. He has been prominent in the economic life of the country, but at the same time he has served in a highly efficient way as ambassador to the Vatican during the war and on other public missions.

My husband had the highest regard for Mr. Taylor. He was one of the few people who typified for me a courtly gentleman of very high standards in business and in private life, and as a man of this type passes from the stage I think he leaves a real vacuum.

We shall be the poorer for the lack of his unobtrusive but nevertheless powerful influence on the lives of those around him. He lived a long life and it was of value to his country, his city and his friends. This is something to be grateful for and there will be many to mourn his loss.

Not long ago I saw a movie on African life which I hope will be widely shown in this country. It is a simple story of an African trying to escape famine in his village and to earn a little money for his family and perhaps be reunited with them in Johannesburg—if he can find work in that South African city.

His knowledge of conditions and restrictions are slight, and he finds himself in all kinds of difficulties. He never does succeed, but the story is developed with understanding and sympathy for the African facing the problems of this area at the present time. It is well worth seeing and understanding these problems.

On Saturday I went to Washington, D.C., and had the pleasure of introducing Mr. Tom Mboya of Kenya, who is traveling in this country, to an Americans for Democratic Action dinner audience.

I had the pleasure also of lunching with Senator Hubert Humphrey on my arrival in Washington on Saturday noon, and in the afternoon I had tea with the Ambassador from Pakistan, Mr. Mohammed Ali.

On Sunday, after seeing some friends at breakfast, I came back to New York to catch up on the details that are always awaiting one after one has been gone for a week on a speaking tour.

A new organization has just been brought to my attention. It is called Retarded Infants Services, Inc., and it supplies help for parents whose babies are so severely mentally retarded that they require care away from home.

The organization provides information for doctors, nurses and other professional workers in the field. It visits parents and helps them to adjust to the birth of such a baby and even gives financial assistance where it is needed.

At present its objective is to organize a nonprofit nursery with special facilities for these babies.

Some financial assistance has been gained from a number of sources and the latest group to help is the National Association of Women Artists. This group will have an exhibition on the evening of May 13 at the National Academy, where award-winning artists will paint celebrated radio and TV personalties. A percentage of the sale of works of art will go to Retarded Infants Services, Inc.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL