My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

MUNCIE, Ind.—Someone came into my office at the American Association for the United Nations the other day to tell me about the International School of America. This is a school that travels—in other words, the students enrolled at this school are almost constantly on the go to all parts of the world and the students are given every opportunity to learn as they travel from place to place.

One particular feature of the curriculum that I liked is the importance that the school's organizers put on the United Nations and its technical assistance programs. Wherever the students go, those in charge of the school tours know what may be going on in any particular place in connection with the U.N.

For instance, right at the start there is a two-weeks visit in New York, where the students study the U.N. headquarters and procedure. Then, in Washington, the group looks into the American commission to UNESCO and learns about the appropriations that Congress makes to support the U.N.

Among other things the traveling students see is a fundamental education center set up by UNESCO in Thailand, and in the New Delhi area in India they observe the work of the Food and Agricultural Organization and the World Health Organization as these agencies relate to India's rural life. Also on the agenda is a visit to Geneva and the European headquarters of the U.N. in that city and, of course, all the other agency headquarters there, particularly WHO and the International Labor Organization.

This happens to be a year of celebration for the ILO, which is the oldest of all the specialized agencies, never having stopped its work which was begun under the League of Nations. Our representative to the ILO at the time of World War II moved its headquarters to Canada, so it was able to continue its work right through the war years.

This trip around the world of the International School of America ends its program in London, where it tries to summarize its impressions of the world, including all its studies of the U.N. This is a great opportunity for any young people who may be able to take advantage of it. A peripatetic school certainly is not usually thought of as a possibility, but this one seems to be an accomplishment in a very successful way.

Just before I began my present trip I was a guest at a dinner of the Mystery Writers Guiid, which presented me with a scroll in memory of my husband.

This dinner was called the Edgar Allen Poe Awards Dinner, and the awards consisted of scrolls, little ravens, and tiny sculptured heads of Edgar Allen Poe. The speaker of the evening was Emily Kimbrough, and she was delightful to hear. We also had the pleasure of listening to several selections, with guitar accompaniment, by Jacqueline Berman.

My husband loved mystery stories and always had a plot he wanted to see worked out.

I had the pleasure of sitting with Mr. and Mrs. Rex Stout and enjoyed the evening greatly.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL