My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—The Appropriations Committee of the Senate has voted twice the amount that the House had approved in emergency funds for loans to underdeveloped countries.

President Eisenhower had asked for $225,000,000 which was the amount Congress had cut from the funds budget of last year in passing the Mutual Security Appropriation Act. The money is designed to help out the Development Loan Fund over the last two and a half months of the present fiscal year.

There undoubtedly will be some compromise arrived at between the House and the Senate, and I would feel anxious to see this money appropriated. But we must try to see that those receiving it make every effort to use it with care and intelligence.

The Development Loan Fund, which was established in 1957 to make term loans at low interest rates to underdeveloped countries, is a vital necessity. But almost as vital is the choice of people who are going to work out the programs for which the loans are made and help the countries to carry their prospects out in a practical manner.

Unless people are trained in the countries to continue whatever work is undertaken after the guiding hand of the representatives of the fund is removed, there is little chance to achieving a program of much practical value.

It was refreshing to me to find in New York City a school that has a really vital United Nations program. The school is George Washington High School, and it, in itself, is a little U.N., for it has students from 52 countries that are represented in the U.N. and a number of other students from other countries that are not yet in the world organization.

This junior U.N. club is made up of a group of students that is only a small part of the school's 5,000 enrollment, but it has given stimulus to the members to find that they can get recognition not only as Americans but as representatives of the countries from which they came.

The members of the club meet every two weeks, under the guidance of club president Daniel Melnick and the social studies teacher, to discuss current problems, especially those involving the United Nations. In this respect they are able to get firsthand from other students information on subjects such as background material on Hungary or on Korea.

The group participates in the annual AAUN contest, in U.N. debates and youth forums, and attends the high-school press conferences at the U.N. where the members meet and talk with many of the official U.N. delegates.

Participation in this junior U.N. organization has brought them an interest in many of the U.N. agencies, and they have conducted four fund-raising campaigns and have collected in small coins over $700 for different agencies of the U.N. They also watch special movies, put on folks dances and songfests, and even sometimes put on a play depicting the work done by various U.N. agencies in different parts of the world.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL