My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WILLIAMSBURG, Va.—I have a letter from a man in Macon, Ga., who suggests that it might be a very good idea if something were worked out so that industrial workers could gain a knowledge of the world and the conditions of other industrial workers through a type of exchange that exists for ministers, teachers and students.

His suggestion is that workers in the same types of industries in other countries would trade places on a temporary basis with workers from the United States. Further, he goes on to say, if the prevailing wages are lower in the foreign country, then our government should make up the difference on a type of fellowship scheme so that the American families should not suffer.

The way I read this gentleman's letter I think he feels that the American worker should remain for a fairly long period in the foreign job—say, about a year—and live as the working people live in that country.

He says that many of our workers would like to avail themselves of such an opportunity and that this would be a way to create a better knowledge of international affairs among the rank and file of our citizens.

I am not sure that this would be greeted with the enthusiasm which he believes would be the case, but I would like to see it tried.

Mr. Milton C. Lightner, National Chairman of National Sunday School Week, has asked me to mention that 1959's week of observance would take place April 13 through 19.

This is an effort to remind all parents of the importance of the religious education of their children, and it is an invitation to all denominations to join in working together during this week to bring boy boys and girls into the churches for religious training.

I think it is important for all our children to learn something about their religions. The Bible is shared by Roman Catholic, Protestant and Jewish groups, and certainly we have all learned that this is a book that is important as history, as literature, and for spiritual understanding and guidance.

Children who do not enjoy the privilege of going to Sunday School miss a great deal of knowledge, which would be easy for them to acquire during a short period once a week.

The American Heritage Foundation, which has been doing such a fine and patriotic piece of work under its president, John C. Cornelius, has just sent me the notice of its objectives for 1959. I think we all will agree that it is an excellent program.

The foundation is going to work for a nationwide law day, designed to emphasize respect for law and order and to urge people to accept jury duty as a basic obligation of American citizenship.

It is going to coordinate "register, vote and contribute to your party" activities in more than 600 cities holding important elections this year, and it is looking ahead to work with other organizations during 1960 when Presidential election will come up. The foundation wants to make as many people as possible conscious of their responsibilities in government before 1960 thrusts us into the throes of a real campaign.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL