My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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PITTSBURGHSunday—I think Senator Theodore F. Green's retirement as head of the Foreign Relations Committee was a very wise move. He has been able to carry responsibility longer than most people, but it is rare that one does not feel handicaps before one reaches the nineties.

Senator Green is to be congratulated for having been able to accept heavy responsibilities for such a long time. He has dealt with these responsibilities ably and well. His great value now, of course, is his long experience and background, the knowledge he has of the past, and the fact that he can back the young people who want to go forward primarily into the future. One lesson that a great many young people can learn from Senator Green is self-imposed discipline. He has probably kept himself in good condition by the rigorous mental and physical routine he has imposed on himself. This kind of self-discipline will do a great deal to keep a man or a woman able to perform the tasks required of them.

Senator Green will remain on the committee, and I feel sure that Senator Fulbright will be strengthened by his presence there. We are fortunate to have a Senator with an international outlook such as Senator Fulbright's to take Senator Green's place. We can both congratulate him and congratulate the committee.

I went to Hyde Park on Friday morning for the annual ceremonies at my husband's grave which take place on his birthday. Three children came to represent the National Foundation—one polio child, and two who represented the new areas which the foundation will cover through research and care. I am very happy that the foundation is not only carrying on the responsibility of continuing the March of Dimes to help the victims of polio, but also has undertaken to do new research in fields to help the public—the children, in particular.

The President's wreath was brought as usual by the Commandant of West Point, with his aide and four cadets. General and Mrs. Davidson, his aide and the cadets, after a tour of the house and library, all came to lunch with my son John and his wife and myself. Wreaths were also laid by the Legion post and the Home Club in Hyde Park, and the prayers were said by the Rev. Gordon Kidd of St. James Episcopal Church.

In the evening I spoke at the high school, on the subject of education at home and abroad, before an audience of the PTA representatives of our various schools in this area.

My grandson, Elliott Roosevelt, Jr. and his wife came up on Wednesday evening and left Hyde Park Sunday morning for New England.

The quiet of the country gives one time to do some of the neglected work which the daily routine in the city never seems to permit one to achieve. But I was back in New York on Sunday afternoon, when I had the pleasure of receiving Mrs. Hansa Mehta of India at tea. She worked with me on the Human Rights Commission and has long been a force in educational work in India.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL