My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON—Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev always speaks as though he were prepared to do everything possible for better understanding between the East and West, and, from his point of view, the West shows less interest in having a peaceful world.

Now, in Geneva, Great Britain and the United States have offered a plan that seems to them a satisfactory guarantee for impartial international control of a ban on the tests of nuclear weapons. It sounds, as one reads it, like a very fair plan.

It remains to be seen whether Mr. Khrushchev really means what he says and if there can really be an advance in the thaw in international tensions which Mr. Khrushchev says he desires.

Under this plan, the Russians would be in half the key technical positions in the control posts in the territory of the two Western powers—the U.S. and Great Britain. Technicians from the U.S. and Britain would man half the positions in the control posts in the Soviet Union. The remaining technical jobs would be filled by international civil servants.

Under the Western plan a Russian would always be the head of a control post in the U.S. and in Britain and an American or a Briton would be the head of a control post in the Soviet Union.

This seems a very fair plan and one cannot help hoping that it will be accepted as a first step toward disarmament. The cessation of the testing of nuclear weapons is doubly important, because there is always the fear of what the fallout means to the human race.

During the entire month of February a campaign will be carried on by the New York Heart Association and the American Heart Association to raise money for a program that is fighting one of the most serious killers in our country.

In New York City alone during 1958 diseases of the heart caused deaths, which is an average of about 123 a day. And this is not a question of what happens to the old alone, for approximately three out of every seven deaths due to a heart ailment occur to those between the ages of 35 and 54. After that age one out of every two is a heart disease casualty.

Much of the money that will be raised will go into research because we need research to discover how to prevent so many people from dying before their time. A 10-year plan has been worked out and the New York Heart Association plans to allocate one million dollars to research for the 1959-60 year, while sister organizations on a regional state-wide basis will allocate an additional five million dollars in that period.

Nationally, the American Heart Association has budgeted more than three million dollars for research. The sad part is that requests for grants for research in this field always will exceed the funds available for allocation. Yet, research is the only way by which we will really know how best to prevent the loss of so many people who should have years of activity before them.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL