My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SIOUX FALLS, S.D.—Our first day out on our current trip for the American Association for the United Nations took us to Indiana, a state where the United Nations has not been popular in all circles, and, therefore, we have had some difficulty in finding a state chairman and starting chapters.

But, as usual, it is the churches and the colleges and schools of communities that take the leadership in understanding the value of the United Nations and the necessity of our being active in international affairs.

Our start in Indiana has been made at Anderson College, which is situated in the city of Anderson, about 35 miles from Indianapolis. It is a religious college under the Church of God. I find it very difficult to remember all the differences of the numerous sects that we build up in the Protestant church, and sometimes I see very little that is really vitally important in these differences.

We were most grateful to have a young Chinese professor, Dr. Pichon Py Loh, take the initiative in forming an AAUN chapter in Anderson and in trying to bring together people from other parts of the state. In this way, perhaps, we will find someone who will act as temporary state chairman and increase the chapters to the point where they can elect their own state chairman.

We spoke to the group of already interested people at the end of their luncheon and then proceeded to the auditorium of the school, where about 1,600 people were gathered. This meeting was designed to bring to an end the model General Assembly which has been put on for the past 13 years and which was participated in by high schools from all over the state. A committee in Anderson College, where the model Assembly took place, has worked hard to make it a success, and this meeting was a climax of their work.

Someone who analyzed the audience said it was interesting to see how many high-school and college students were present, and how many members of the clergy of every denomination and schoolteachers and college professors as well as industrial workers and farmers were there. This is an industrial city, but the management, which runs the various industries, was conspicuous by its absence, and my observer commented that much work would have to be done to convince the business people of the community that they really have a stake in the U.N.

I sometimes wonder whether these business people, who are so busy producing in our nation, stop to think how much they need from other countries in order to keep up their production. I wonder if they are concerned about where they will sell their increased production unless they help to develop the desire for their products and the ability to buy them in the nations of the world which, up to now at least, have neither produced for our use nor bought our finished products to any great degree.

Our industrialists need to look a little further into the future. They will soon find out that the U.N. has real importance for them, for it is through the U.N. that production will be brought about and the ability to buy new goods can be achieved.

We left our very hospitable hosts after an early dinner and the following morning flew over the snowy countryside to Minneapolis and here, for our next 24-hour stop.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL