My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CHICAGO—Last Thursday afternoon I went over to speak at the Brooklyn College of Pharmacy, which is part of Long Island University. This school is entirely supported by student tuition fees, yet those fees are kept remarkably low. I confess that I knew little about the education given to the men and women who make up our doctors' prescriptions in our drugstores, and I was very much interested in the research institute and the laboratories where studies are being made and experiments carried out which deal with therapy for the control of diseases. I was surprised, in fact, to see the extent of the education given the young people who graduate from colleges of pharmacy. Although their special interests lie along clearly defined lines and their studies have to be intensive in a particular area, it was interesting that they should still wish carry on a course, in which I spoke, dealing with general interests in various other fields.

In the evening we had the pleasure after dinner of getting David Lilienthal to tell us a little about the work he and his associates are carrying out in Iran. This development of the Persian rivers may lead to a return to the agricultural plenty which once existed in the great Persian plain. Here they once grew the best sugar in the world, and, with irrigation, the soil has been found to be favorable for a return to this kind of cultivation. Iran now imports great quantities of sugar, but there may be a complete change in its economy if she can not only supply her own needs but those of some of her neighbors.

It is fascinating to hear about really practical efforts to restore the fertility of land and rebuild the economy of a nation, and I am quite sure that Mr. Lilienthal awakened in all of us a new interest in this great country so rich in history and in literature.

If you have a family consisting of two small boys—one perhaps two or three years older than the other—you will enjoy a picture book and its captions called "My Little Brother Gets Away With Murder," by Alan and Harry Pesin. The authors are father and older son. The little brother is that lovely, golden-haired angel, around two or three, who behaves like a devil and never looks like one. If anywhere you have had a combination of this kind, you will chuckle from beginning to end, and I promise you ten minutes of real amusement.

I received another little book the other day which will take you just a minute to look at, but you may enjoy reading it and showing the pictures to your children or grandchildren. It is a book of rhymes dedicated to "boys and girls everywhere," and one of the nicest rhymes is about "children everywhere." The title is "Green Book," the verses are by Jean Merin, and it is illustrated by Kathleen Spagnolo.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL