My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—As the deliverers' strike continues, somehow I become a little more accustomed to being without New York newspapers. But I wonder whether the union leadership, which apparently did not control its membership, has done a very good job of educating the members.

I am told that it was the left-wing group within the union that would not agree to what the leaders thought was satisfactory, and this group won out only by a small majority. Perhaps these members have not been fully enough informed as to the effects of a prolonged strike such as they have forced upon the newspapers and many other groups.

Stores have lost enormously in sales; the newspapers have lost enormously in advertising; the public in general has been greatly inconvenienced.

I have heard more grumbling about labor unions than I have heard for a very long time. This is bad public relations.

Members of the deliverers' union may have felt that a strike at this inconvenient time would bring about a quicker agreement, but that does not seem to have been the result. It has created a rift between people who should work together for their mutual benefit.

At this writing the Atlas satellite seems to be corresponding regularly with us from space.

I think it is a good idea to forewarn the world when we are to launch a new missile or satellite into space. This is a new problem which nations involved in space exploration have to face, for with each new discovery new dangers as well as knowledge surely will appear.

I returned Sunday from Hyde Park on roads remarkably free of traffic congestion. But once in New York, I don't think I ever saw the streets so crowded.

Everyone must have decided, as it began to get dark, to view the Christmas decorations. No matter where you went, you crawled through the sidestreets and, looking up and down the avenues, wondered which one would permit you the best chance to move with moderate speed.

But in spite of it all you enjoyed the colorful store windows and the new ways which people have found to decorate them. One such window, on 57th Street, struck me as being quite original. There were clouds inside of what looked like blankets of snow, and right in the center of one window was a little boy circling round and round on skates. In another, a charmingly dressed little girl was turning around so everyone could see her pretty dress.

I spent a pleasant Saturday at Hyde park, and before leaving for the city on Sunday I had the pleasure of welcoming the first contingent of my holiday guests when my niece, Mrs. Eleanor Elliott, and her four children arrived.

We were busy on Monday with preparations for a young people's party at the Cosmopolitan Club here in New York. I hope that all had a good time, as befits their age, but there seem to be so many parties that I don't know how they can enjoy flitting from one to another.

We all enjoyed this sort of thing when we were young, however, and it is only as we get older that we wonder where the young people get their energy!

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL