My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ROYAL OAK, Mich.—Last Sunday was not exactly a day of peace and rest for me in New York City, and if the remainder of the week is to be as busy and as crowded I am in for a very busy time.

I began by doing a recording for the election campaign. Then I returned for a visit with my grandson, Curtis, who brought me an outline of some work he had been doing and asked me to go over it with him.

A short time later I attended a luncheon given by the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies and was astonished to find that I was being named by these hard-working and remarkable women as the "Woman of the Century." They had a number of noted "Women of the Year," but my age has promoted me to being "Woman of the Century." They presented me with a lovely silver tray in memory of the occasion.

My only regret was that because I had an engagement at four o'clock I was obliged to leave before Leonard Lyons made his appeal for work and funds. It always seems superfluous to me to make an appeal to these hard-working women, because they would do their work and give of their funds whether they were asked or not.

I would have liked to wait to hear Mr. Lyons because he is always amusing and witty, and he has so many trips behind him which I have not yet heard about that I might have gleaned some valuable information. But I had promised to be home to meet two ladies on another matter. And as so often happens, I discovered that the ladies could just as easily have made their request over the telephone. All they really wanted was for me to judge some essays in a contest, which they will have well screened so that the judges will have to read only six essays to decide on the winners.

Then I had a short visit with an old friend, and started off for the TV program, "Meet the Press."

I don't think I did very well on this program, for I am afraid on one or two questions my meaning was far from clear in my answers. So, I want to say quite definitely that when I said Mr. Keating (Rep. Kenneth B. Keating) was not much better than Mr. Hogan (District Attorney Frank S. Hogan) I was talking about their positions as regards foreign affairs.

I do consider Mr. Hogan far preferable for the U.S. Senate from our state. My only hesitancy about voting for him arises out of the fact that he was Mr. DeSapio's candidate and will, therefore, in spite of his desire to be completely independent, still owe Mr. DeSapio careful attention.

Since Mr. Keating will owe his Republican boss the same attention, I realize this is no reason for not voting for Mr. Hogan. Therefore, I shall vote for the Democratic party as a whole, since I believe that it is important to the nation for the party to win this year.

Every state that registers itself on the side of the Democratic party has helped to say to the world: "We do not agree as people with our Administration's policies. We are anxious to see them changed and we hope the Democrats will make new policies even without executive leadership. We would like our world and our national policies treated with more imagination and new answers found to the conditions which exist in the world and which affect our home conditions."

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL