My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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TORONTO—A rather interesting thing has happened in Dutchess County, where a group of American citizens recently came together and decided that somewhere in New York State there should be an answer to the Little Rock situation.

This group enlisted sponsorship in the county for a show to be given on November 1 which would bring in all the volunteers, but professional, talent they could find in Dutchess County. They also welcome the help of outside talent, of course, and their program, which will range from symphony music to rock 'n roll, will be presented by a completely interracial group of artists. All the money raised will go to the NAACP to pay legal fees in connection with the battle being waged on integration in the schools. Entitled "Melody Fair," the program will take place at the Poughkeepsie High School at 8:00 p.m. on the evening of Saturday, November 1. Jackie Robinson will be the master of ceremonies, and I hope a large audience will attend.

It is impressive to find that someone in Dutchess County felt strongly enough about the Little Rock situation to want to show that an interracial group could come together in this state and enjoy working in behalf of a serious purpose like this one. I look forward with great pleasure to taking my guests to see this show.

In local politics, it was to be expected that Nelson Rockefeller would have breakfast with Vice President Nixon the other day and that the picture of these two genial gentlemen would appear in our New York papers. Mr. Rockefeller was not anxious for either Mr. Nixon or the President to come and help him in his campaign for Governor; but with Mr. Nixon in town, there had to be a show of unity. On the whole, in spite of what I am sure has been the professional advice on both sides, the campaign in this state, particularly on domestic issues, has been dull, if on a rather high personal plane. It has not engendered either heat or a great deal of interest, and I can just imagine how at this moment Mr. Nixon must feel. Going around the country cannot be cheering either to the President or the Vice President.

I have just received the American Artists group of Christmas cards which they have the kindness to send me every year. The noted artists who created this 24th annual collection of Christmas cards have proved that this occasion and the religious and secular Christmas activities have a great appeal for today's artists. I think it is a compliment to the taste of the American public that the publication of these cards has been so successful and that they are chosen as permanent gifts at Christmas time for those who want to send their friends a bit of real art for their homes.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL