My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—There are certain nuclear weapons tests that can be carried on without danger of fallout, I am told. But in view of the recent United Nations atom panel's report, all other tests should be stopped.

It is important to the Soviet Union as it is to us that this be done; therefore, it might be well to comply with the Soviets' request on this question.

We evidently hate to do anything the Soviets ask us to do—and I don't wonder that it goes against the grain—but it would seem that wisdom points to the stopping of these tests and that it is in the self-interest of everyone to do so.

The United Nations Assembly has reconvened after adjourning for several days, giving the representatives of both the United States and the Soviet Union time for consultations on the Mideast situation, together with the Secretary General an opportunity to present his plan for procedure in that area of the world.

Points proposed by the U.S. and scheduled for consideration included a U.N. police force to protect any threatened countries in the Middle East; a U.N. guarantee of existing borders in the Middle East, and a U.N. commission to investigate and report complaints of indirect aggression.

It was evident that the latter point, at least, would be opposed by the Soviets, who at no time have resisted mention of indirect aggression and have concentrated on the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Lebanon and British troops from Jordan.

I think India acted wisely when she announced that any settlement must acknowledge Israel's permanent existence, and I think if we made the same announcement, it would aid an agreement between the Arab states and the U.N.

The whole story of the theft of gems worth $163,300 from the windowof Tiffany's on New York's Fifth Avenue is one of extraordinary coincidence or of cooperation by someone on the police force and someone inside of the building.

How were the burglars to know that a patrol normally in that neighborhood would be called off for a short period—only 20 minutes—and why would the crime be discovered 10 minutes after the new man came on patrol? And even at that hour of the morning, it would seem that the breaking of plate glass windows would attract somebody's attention.

One cannot help but be suspicious that there was connivance somewhere along the line.

I came back to New York Monday from a weekend in Hyde Park where I enjoyed a visit from Mr. and Mrs. Clark Eichelberger, Dr. and Mrs. Milan Kuna and Charles Pursell.

My uncle, David Gray, was also with us and, although 88, was the life of the party. I was sad to have to bring him into New York and see him start for other visits.

My cousin, Mrs. W. Forbes Morgan, and her children also left me in preparation for a year's visit in Europe, so my "summer family" is dwindling fast.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL