My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK—Apparently there is little hope that the United Nations Council meeting, to which the big powers are invited to send their chiefs, will take place at the headquarters in New York. Geneva, Switzerland will certainly be the next best place, as it has the traditions of the old League meeting place, and the atmosphere has always remained international.

President Eisenhower has announced that he will attend this council meeting and has urged Mr. Khrushchev to be there also. In his note he said what we all believe to be true—namely, that our troops are in Lebanon only as the result of indirect aggression on the part of Syria, probably instigated, or at least we so believe, by the Soviet Union. We landed our troops at the request of Lebanon's government, and we feel that the rebels were a minority group sent by those who wished to destroy the Lebanese government because of its orientation toward and its cooperation with the Western powers. Both we and the British have asked for a Security Council meeting around August 12, and the President rejected the idea that the big powers meet without the small powers being present.

I would like to feel sure that we knew exactly what we want to obtain at this meeting. I am quite certain that the Soviets will come with firm objectives in mind. If we are not equally clear in our minds, they will be more successful than we will be—or at least, very little will be done.

It is reported that we will recognize the new regime in Iraq shortly. But two of our Marines were arrested by soldiers on Friday and, unless they are released, we will certainly delay recognition of the new government. Our policy has always been to recognize a government which seemed to be stable. But in the Arab countries in the Middle East at present, no government seems to be very stable, so I suppose we feel we must deal with someone, and the Assistant Secretary of State, Robert Murphy, must have recommended this action.

In another area of the world where we have had a wise traveler in Dr. Milton Eisenhower, we have obtained information on Latin America and three definite recommendations. Dr. Eisenhower urges the United States to consider "the imperative need for bankable loans, not grants, in every country visited." Secondly, he said we should consider "the response which I believe the United States should make to the appeal of the Latin American nations for more stable relationships between raw commodity prices and the prices of manufactured products." Lastly, he sees "the urgent and immediate need to bring about throughout the hemisphere a clear, accurate understanding of United States policies, purposes, programs and capabilities."

Dr. Eisenhower believes that Latin American countries are firm friends of the United States, and he is well liked in those countries. He could take this trip in the wake of the Vice President's disastrous so-called "goodwill tour," get by without incident and return with sensible recommendations for cooperation. He does not hesitate to say that cooperation is a two-way street, and that our South and Central American neighbors must do their share of cooperating.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL