My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—I will be surprised if the Post Office Department realizes the expected $547 million increase in revenue as a result of the higher postal rates that went into effect last Friday.

The ordinary person will, of course, take greater care and write fewer letters. Business firms and organizations, which really spend a great deal in mailing charges, may find it more difficult to cut down. But some of them certainly will economize on their mailing.

So just how profitable this change in the postal system will be remains to be seen.

Many people living outside of the South must have been saddened by the renomination of Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas because of the burden it places on the nation in its international struggle with the Soviet Union and because it encourages defiance of the law here at home.

The Republican New York Herald Tribune says the vote will put the Democratic party under a severe handicap in the 1958 Congressional election campaign and in the 1960 Presidential campaign.

I do not think this is necessarily so if a large number of Democrats, who strongly believe in the recognition of civil rights, insist that their party write a platform that clearly spells out the Democrats' position of equality for all American citizens.

To the timid souls who would sacrifice their principles to keep the party together, I would say that in doing so they are likely to wreck the party.

A large number of Democrats believe in obeying the law and in the right of the Supreme Court to interpret the meaning of the law and the Constitution. They believe, too, in the right of every citizen of the United States to be treated as an equal in every way.

Discrimination is not equality. And the old doctrine of equal but separate cannot hold any longer because the world has changed and we are engaged in a life and death struggle with the Soviet Union requiring that we win to our side the peoples in the uncommitted areas of the world. Many of them, being colored themselves, will turn away if we do not treat all of our own citizens on an equal basis.

A cargo of Japanese tea, which arrived late last week in New York, was said to have been "slightly radioactive" and is being examined carefully.

Despite the tests by the Coast Guard and customs agents, some people will have suspicions about this cargo, though it was expected that the radioactivity had been dissipated before the ship reached New York.

We import little tea from Japan, and this variety of green tea, considered one of that country's very best, comprises only one percent of the tea used in the U.S.

The Japanese have had an unhappy time with radioactivity and, therefore, are anxious that our nuclear tests in the Pacific be stopped. As a matter of fact, however, tea is not one of our important imports from Japan.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL