My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—Very slowly our government seems to be reaching the point of finding it possible to establish a system of protection leading to an agreement to give up nuclear explosions for a stated period.

I hope that this will mean that we will move forward, for whether we come to a summit conference or not, there should be no slowing down in our efforts to meet the Soviets' offer of anything which will lead toward consideration of disarmament.

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Judging by the way the first nine states have hastened to sign up for Federal help to extend benefits to the jobless, there must be wider areas having unemployment trouble than the Administration had hoped would prove to be the case.

Because the states vary in the period of time that they grant unemployment insurance, the Federal government will continue these payments for half again as long as each state allows them.

These Federal payments can only be made with the Governor's agreement because the Federal funds received by the state must be repaid. The Federal treasury will recover the money through an increase in the Federal unemployment tax on employers in states where the aid is distributed, unless the state treasury assumes the burden.

A state can, of course, sign up for aid to certain groups, and this has been done in some cases to assist unemployed Federal workers and unemployed Korean veterans because in these two cases the aid does not have to be repaid. In some cases, the states themselves will increase their aid for unemployment.

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The New Republic has reprinted an article by Margaret Halsey called "Beware the Tender Trap." It is an article on our Vice-President, Richard M. Nixon, but it points out an attitude of mind which has come about among certain people which is interesting and perhaps widely spread and should be drawn to our attention.

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There is an organization called Arrow, Inc., which is doing something for young American Indians. Last November it held a conference on American Indian youth problems—the first conference of this kind ever to be held—and two weeks ago a tri-state conference on Indian youth was held in North Dakota.

This organization has affiliated with the Young Adult Council of the United Nations National Social Welfare Assembly. It has much to do here at home, but its members feel that in taking an interest in the problems of the youth of the world they will broaden their interests and gain a wider understanding of the world in which they live.

So a young Navajo Indian will be sent to the World Assembly of Youth in New Delhi, India, this year to represent the American Indians for the first time in the U.N. Arrow, Inc., is sponsoring and financing this trip and it brought the young Indian to New York for briefings under the direction of the National Social Welfare Assembly.

Arrow, Inc. has as its president Lewis R. Bruce Jr. and as its Vice-President Will Rogers Jr. Its headquarters is in Washington, D.C. Perhaps among my readers there is someone who would like to help our young American Indians move forward into closer cooperation with the young people of the rest of the world.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL